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Are excess toxins just passed through an animal's body if its fat cells are completely saturated?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 25, 2011 at 12:12 AM

As many of us know, toxins are stored in fat cells if they are not eliminated by the body. What if you eat a small animal, like a commercially raised chicken from a factory farm, does there even come a point where its fat cells are so saturated with toxins that any toxins it ingests just pass through the body?

Even if toxins continuously accumulate, are they less likely to be stored if there's already a substantial amount of toxins already inside its body?

C029fb3c7c1f1ed4a004390bef728e2d

(236)

on August 25, 2011
at 04:25 PM

I believe making the distinction that insulin's primary role is to remove inflammatory agents from the blood is imperative to get to that next level of leanness. The question becomes, how does one drain very toxic elements being stored in fat cells? The fat cells won't release it easily...

C029fb3c7c1f1ed4a004390bef728e2d

(236)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:58 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin_resistance Look at third sentence. Glycogen is what the liver turns glucose into, but insulin does not open the liver for receipt of excess glucose; it opens the fat and muscles to receive it. Insulin is secreted in response to inflammatory agents, shuttling into muscle or fat cells. Clearly, this is a system designed to remove inflammatory agents from the blood.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 25, 2011
at 12:21 PM

One of insulin's roles is to clear glucose from the blood. But glucose is not stored in fat (that I know of). It is stored (as glycogen) in liver and muscle tissue. It can be converted to fat (palmitic acid) and then stored in fat - but palmitic acid is not toxic - although high levels od adipose tissue are inflammatory. Still not buying the fat stores toxins hypothesis. Do you have any papers to show me the errors of my ways?

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2 Answers

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A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 25, 2011
at 12:40 AM

Is this true? Are toxins stored in fat cells? Or is this a myth perpetuated by detox/cleanse diet promoters?

I haven't seen any science that backs this idea up, but it seems to permeate the internet/holistic health/US pop culture. Someone at work asked me today what I thought about detox/cleanse stuff and I said that I thought there was no basis for it. Is that accurate?

1
C029fb3c7c1f1ed4a004390bef728e2d

on August 25, 2011
at 05:05 AM

Yes, fat cells are multi purpose containers and one function of them is to store elements in the blood that are inflammatory. This is why many things are insulinogenic, as insulin is excreted in response to a detected toxin.

This is fundamentally why insulin rises with excess glucose, as the body treats excess glucose as toxic. The function of glucose storage is itself an indication that the purpose of fat cells is to store toxins.

C029fb3c7c1f1ed4a004390bef728e2d

(236)

on August 25, 2011
at 04:25 PM

I believe making the distinction that insulin's primary role is to remove inflammatory agents from the blood is imperative to get to that next level of leanness. The question becomes, how does one drain very toxic elements being stored in fat cells? The fat cells won't release it easily...

C029fb3c7c1f1ed4a004390bef728e2d

(236)

on August 25, 2011
at 03:58 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin_resistance Look at third sentence. Glycogen is what the liver turns glucose into, but insulin does not open the liver for receipt of excess glucose; it opens the fat and muscles to receive it. Insulin is secreted in response to inflammatory agents, shuttling into muscle or fat cells. Clearly, this is a system designed to remove inflammatory agents from the blood.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on August 25, 2011
at 12:21 PM

One of insulin's roles is to clear glucose from the blood. But glucose is not stored in fat (that I know of). It is stored (as glycogen) in liver and muscle tissue. It can be converted to fat (palmitic acid) and then stored in fat - but palmitic acid is not toxic - although high levels od adipose tissue are inflammatory. Still not buying the fat stores toxins hypothesis. Do you have any papers to show me the errors of my ways?

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