12

votes

Anyone ever try an all fat diet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 18, 2011 at 2:10 AM

I've been thinking about my Type 1 diabetes and wondering what I could ever due to get off insulin or if I was ever caught in a situation where I couldn't get access to it or healthcare like say your average and ordinary Zombie Apocalypse. I know that carbs and protein elevate Blood Glucose levels but I'm not sure what fat does to it necessarily. I'm wondering how long I could go without insulin? If going on 100% fat diet could sustain me. I'm thinking if I could only eat coconut oil or lard. Something that would be easy to find in a broken down grocery store or something. Of course you could also find insulin but hey, just wondering.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 20, 2011
at 06:36 PM

It's gonna be Zombies or Cybernetic Super Ninja's from Antares 3.

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on November 20, 2011
at 05:22 PM

+1 for Zombie reference!

8c509aac21bdb54b3ca91de2da994b9b

(248)

on November 20, 2011
at 02:20 PM

I think you would find this blog post interesting - about controlling sugar and a high fat diet. Read thru to the end - give it a chance. Just wanted to share since there may be nuggest of useful information in there for you.... http://www.holdthetoast.com/content/so-what-happened-me

3b002cfb591bae7438140adc0df5f771

on November 20, 2011
at 02:16 PM

It is also not right to suggest that protein and fat will 'bring blood sugar back up to good levels with a bite or fatty meat/fish as it does with anything else that would cause the next spike/crash.' If a T1 (or T2 on insulin) has hypoglycaemia, (low blood glucose) they need fast acting carbohydrates.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on November 18, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Lots of evidence out there to prove that eating too much protein in one meal - it will convert to glucose - not ideal if diabetic.

D3f3b91d1dd9ce60865654faeb2ec809

on November 18, 2011
at 04:46 PM

I experimented with an ~90% fat, 8% protein, 2% carb diet for about a week. Worst steatorrhoea I've ever experienced.

D3f3b91d1dd9ce60865654faeb2ec809

on November 18, 2011
at 04:45 PM

I experimented with a ~90% fat, 8% protein, 2% carb diet for about a week. Worst steatorrhoea I've ever experienced.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 18, 2011
at 03:23 PM

Kwasniewski's Optimal diet and a standard Ketogenic diet (the type epileptics use), both come pretty close. Keto diet is 80% fat/10% protein/10% CHO by calories. Optimal works out to roughly 80/15/5. Below 10% protein and you will lose lean body mass, which is not helpful for future glucose clearance. I suppose you could try 90/10/0, but I would recommend ramping up slowly on the fat to avois steatorrhea (ie, the liquid (oily) farts mentioned above. And the Jaminet's may have a point that a certain (smallish) amount of carbs is both useful and necessary. Even for diabetics.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 18, 2011
at 06:29 AM

All fat would be zero carbs and zero protein. The body can go on without carbs. However it can not go on without at least some protein.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 06:25 AM

@Caveman not that I can recall.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 18, 2011
at 06:06 AM

Proteins are made from simpler substances called amino acids. There are 20 amino acids in the protein that we eat every day. The body takes these amino acids and links them together in very long strings. This is how the body makes all of the different proteins it needs to function properly. Nine of the amino acids are called essential because bodies cannot make them. These essential amino acids must come from the foods we eat.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 05:20 AM

Kick @SS. I'll read it in the AM.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 05:17 AM

@ Amerindian Agreed. Does he have any science to explain why?

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 04:42 AM

But the most important fact for the purposes of this discussion is that he is not a diabetic, type I or otherwise. My original point is that protein does in fact have an effect on blood glucose/insulin levels in non-diabetics.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 04:42 AM

@Caveman yeah I won't defend the scientific validity of any experiment with a sample size of 1. But during his attempts to test some commonly, or perhaps not so common beliefs he had the best results with lemon juice, 3 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice before meals reduced the effect of food on blood glucose levels. I don't imagine that eliminated effect on blood glucose levels just that they wouldn't be as high I guess. I like his process of self experimentation using accurate means of measurement, so I give a little more weight.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 04:25 AM

@ animalcule Do you think that would work (eating pancreas?)

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 04:04 AM

@Amerindian wouldn't the lemon juice raise glucose levels then? Tim Ferris has some flaws in his logic in 4 hour body.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 04:03 AM

Nancy your new so I won't downvote you, but this it the most uninformed thing I've ever ready. A type 1 diabetic cannot use protein to lower blood sugar. You can more than surely raise your blood sugar with protein. I'm not solid on the science but I think that the body will convert the amino acids in the protein to glucose if there is a glucose scarcity. This happens very slowly so if you are not Type 1 diabetic, your body will have ample time to respond by releasing insulin. For a type 1 diabetic anything can raise blood sugar, stress, magnesium deficiency, lack of sleep, Xfit WOD etc.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 03:54 AM

Tim Ferris noted in his book *The Four Body* that during his experiment with a real-time blood glucose monitor implant that any big meal spiked levels. Even if it was protein. He did say that lemon juice before meals helped to mitigate the effects though.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on November 18, 2011
at 03:36 AM

I think diarrhea is just as bad for hemorrhoids as constipation for some reason.

6229cd9a7ca9882590259fae022e2647

(3209)

on November 18, 2011
at 03:06 AM

On the other hand if you've had problems with constipation and therefore hemmeroids(sp?), that may be a good way to let everything heal up.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on November 18, 2011
at 02:36 AM

Once I was probably at about 80% fat for some reason. Liquid farts, dude. You don't want to try this. Killing pigs and eating their pancreas would be more fun.

D3f3b91d1dd9ce60865654faeb2ec809

on November 18, 2011
at 02:17 AM

Are you crazy, friend?

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7 Answers

best answer

5
34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 05:16 AM

So I did a little searching and found a write-up by "Ed" from The Survivalist Blog about the book Diabetes 911. It comes down having at least a 30 day supply and waiting for the Calvary. Beyond 90 days to 6 months the outlook is pretty bleak. There are herbal remedies but they can be difficult to supply adequate dosages and can have very serious side effects including death.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 05:20 AM

Kick @SS. I'll read it in the AM.

3
6670b38baf0aae7f4d8ac2463ddc37c0

(3946)

on November 18, 2011
at 03:50 AM

This seems like a funny/silly question, but I think you are smart to consider your options should something like the zombie-apocalypse actually occur. I just read this book link text about a similar situation. All of the pharmacies ran out of insulin (along with all other meds) and the diabetics eventually died off. The book, along with a concurrent massive power outage here on the West Coast, made me go out and buy outrageous amounts of emergency food and other zombie attack related supplies. You are smart to consider your alternatives to emergency food rations. I wouldn't know where to begin, aside from "go for the fat and protein" so I hope you get some serious advice.

2
D3ba748096c1abedcb777c204f76803b

on November 18, 2011
at 03:05 AM

Protein will NOT elevate blood glucose levels much if at all. Carbohydrates and sugars will. Fat also helps stabilize blood glucose levels. I have noticed a few Paleo people eat way too many carbohydrates and still have problems with their blood sugar levels. Cut the carbs and get rid of the blood sugar spikes. I eat a low carb version of Paleo because I deserve to be healthy. Cut the carbs and enjoy a healthier life. The American Diabetes Association says we deserve to eat what we want. Well, I deserve a better quality of health more than fulfilling some selfish desire for foods that cause my blood sugar to spike and crash. Why put myself in the position of dangerous health problems or death just to eat something that hurts me. I deserve better. If I have blood sugar problems then I need to eat according to help overcome that problem. Also, if you do eat something that causes blood sugar problems...STOP IT! and when blood sugar problems arise...use protein, not insulin, not carbs or sugars. It takes just about the same amount of time to bring blood sugar back up to good levels with a bite or fatty meat/fish as it does with anything else that would cause the next spike/crash. Meats will not do that. Get a carb counter booklet too and find out which vegetables are safest to eat. And enjoy a bite or two of fruit after having your fatty meats and then the vegetables. You will be healthier for it.

286a4ff7c362241c5c4b020df4972212

(1288)

on November 18, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Lots of evidence out there to prove that eating too much protein in one meal - it will convert to glucose - not ideal if diabetic.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 03:54 AM

Tim Ferris noted in his book *The Four Body* that during his experiment with a real-time blood glucose monitor implant that any big meal spiked levels. Even if it was protein. He did say that lemon juice before meals helped to mitigate the effects though.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 04:42 AM

But the most important fact for the purposes of this discussion is that he is not a diabetic, type I or otherwise. My original point is that protein does in fact have an effect on blood glucose/insulin levels in non-diabetics.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 04:03 AM

Nancy your new so I won't downvote you, but this it the most uninformed thing I've ever ready. A type 1 diabetic cannot use protein to lower blood sugar. You can more than surely raise your blood sugar with protein. I'm not solid on the science but I think that the body will convert the amino acids in the protein to glucose if there is a glucose scarcity. This happens very slowly so if you are not Type 1 diabetic, your body will have ample time to respond by releasing insulin. For a type 1 diabetic anything can raise blood sugar, stress, magnesium deficiency, lack of sleep, Xfit WOD etc.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 05:17 AM

@ Amerindian Agreed. Does he have any science to explain why?

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 04:42 AM

@Caveman yeah I won't defend the scientific validity of any experiment with a sample size of 1. But during his attempts to test some commonly, or perhaps not so common beliefs he had the best results with lemon juice, 3 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice before meals reduced the effect of food on blood glucose levels. I don't imagine that eliminated effect on blood glucose levels just that they wouldn't be as high I guess. I like his process of self experimentation using accurate means of measurement, so I give a little more weight.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on November 18, 2011
at 06:25 AM

@Caveman not that I can recall.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on November 18, 2011
at 04:04 AM

@Amerindian wouldn't the lemon juice raise glucose levels then? Tim Ferris has some flaws in his logic in 4 hour body.

3b002cfb591bae7438140adc0df5f771

on November 20, 2011
at 02:16 PM

It is also not right to suggest that protein and fat will 'bring blood sugar back up to good levels with a bite or fatty meat/fish as it does with anything else that would cause the next spike/crash.' If a T1 (or T2 on insulin) has hypoglycaemia, (low blood glucose) they need fast acting carbohydrates.

0
3b002cfb591bae7438140adc0df5f771

on November 20, 2011
at 01:56 PM

The Allen Diet might work for a while, it included very few carbs, some protein and about 70% fat. It was also very low calorie. Many of his patients survived a while, from a few months to a few years. They became malnourished and very thin. You can read Allen's manual, complete with diet sheets online . http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924104225283#page/n0/mode/2up

In a real 'appocalypse scenario; the Jewish ghetto during WW2 in Shanghai, Eva Saxyl and her husband found a better solution. They worked out how to successfully produce insulin from the pancreases of water buffalo http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read/2002/01/01/3495/evas-insulin/

0
B6114a1980b1481fb18206064f3f4a4f

(3924)

on November 18, 2011
at 05:45 PM

I don't think a human can live on an all fat diet. You can go without carbs but not without protein. Your body would struggle to keep you brain and vital organs alive by eventually cannibalizing your skeletal muscles (or other body parts it doesn't consider as important) to fulfill your vital organs' need for protein. Would this self-cannibalization trigger a need for insulin? I'm not sure. I guess the question is would this give you more time to find the needed insulin (or to get help in an survival situation) than other options such as not eating at all or only eating fat and protein.

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on November 18, 2011
at 05:18 PM

I've heard some of the raw milk advocates claim that there is insulin plus something to get it where it needs to be in the body in raw milk. Apocalypse cow?

-2
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 18, 2011
at 04:54 AM

Always eat some protein.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 18, 2011
at 06:06 AM

Proteins are made from simpler substances called amino acids. There are 20 amino acids in the protein that we eat every day. The body takes these amino acids and links them together in very long strings. This is how the body makes all of the different proteins it needs to function properly. Nine of the amino acids are called essential because bodies cannot make them. These essential amino acids must come from the foods we eat.

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