1

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Consumed fat vs. Stored fat for mild loss fat (Meal timing)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 05, 2012 at 11:49 AM

I'm familiar with the physiological processes that occur in the use of fat for energy (beta-oxidation and so on). That said, I don't control my diet based on time (I learned to know when I'm hungry instead of starving).

I have a diet rich in polyunsaturated fats and animal protein. It is not a diet I have for achieving a specific goal, it is just the stuff I like to eat (It came all together, eventually). However, I would like to alter it a little bit to promote some fat loss without interrupting protein synthesis (I recently started working out again). Due to my relatively low body fat %, I wonder how long I would have to wait after eating for my body to start breaking stored fat at a greater rate and how long it would stay at that before it starts dropping my metabolism drastically.

Body Stats:

  • Age: 21
  • Height: 6 feet
  • Weight: 185
  • BF %: 11.5

Estimation for diet:

  • Meals (4x): 60-70% fat, 20-30% protein, 0-10% carbs, 600 cals
  • Snacks (3x): 40% fat, 60% protein, 200 cals
  • Post-workout: 30% fat, 30% protein, 30% glucose (lactose free milk), 200 cals

I've been gaining weight with little reduction to my BF % (Based on my calculations, I'm confident the % loss was a product of muscle mass increase and not body fat loss). I have quite some subcutaneous fat around the waist that is asking to go away. It is just sitting there, and it seems that my body is leaving it alone. I wonder if integrating my snacks to my meals and giving greater intervals between meals will get my body to a point where it will rely on my "waist battery" for short periods of time right before getting another meal, gradually getting rid of it (Even if it sacrifices protein synthesis for that period). In fact, I don't mind if I just move it from subcutaneous to visceral (If that is even possible).

Thanks for your attention

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on November 19, 2012
at 01:41 PM

So if you're waiting 3 hours to eat your post-workout meal, you're actually producing more insulin than you would have been 3 hours earlier, and fat burning (not to mention recovery) will be compromised.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on November 19, 2012
at 01:36 PM

@crightfunnylol- One of the many benefits of consuming food postworkout is that insulin sensitivity is through the roof, so even eating a protein/carb heavy meal, the nutrients will get into the (muscle) cells with very little work from your pancreas.

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on November 05, 2012
at 10:33 PM

fasted from the night before, and if you want to maximize weight loss, insulin after a workout might not be the best thing since you also burn fat for a couple of hours after too, you can wait for your PW meal like 2 or 3 hours(with the glucose)

Adc2b32360bf7acc6ad71561ebbc7f11

(5)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:36 PM

Mainly pork in the form of cold cuts and tuna, followed by cattle and occasionally chicken. I eventually bite on pistachios and Brazil nuts (part of snacks and while meat is cooking if I'm cooking). No significant fat from fruits; a few cantaloupe watermelon pieces when I feel like having something sweet. I workout more as a hobby, and HIIT would somewhat work against it (I've considered it already).

Adc2b32360bf7acc6ad71561ebbc7f11

(5)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:29 PM

Fasted for how long? And after working out, why not at least restore some of the glycogen reserves in the liver with a little glucose?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 05, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Have you looked at the leangains approach? He is keen on helping people get to and maintain a low body fat %. HIIT may also help. People often say that it is harder to lose weight the lighter on gets... What do you mean by diet rich in PUFAs and animal protein? Chicken and duck, nuts, avocadoes...?

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1 Answers

-1
2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on November 05, 2012
at 01:18 PM

train fasted, and wait a couple of hours bafter your workout to eat(and be consistent)

Adc2b32360bf7acc6ad71561ebbc7f11

(5)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:29 PM

Fasted for how long? And after working out, why not at least restore some of the glycogen reserves in the liver with a little glucose?

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on November 05, 2012
at 10:33 PM

fasted from the night before, and if you want to maximize weight loss, insulin after a workout might not be the best thing since you also burn fat for a couple of hours after too, you can wait for your PW meal like 2 or 3 hours(with the glucose)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on November 19, 2012
at 01:36 PM

@crightfunnylol- One of the many benefits of consuming food postworkout is that insulin sensitivity is through the roof, so even eating a protein/carb heavy meal, the nutrients will get into the (muscle) cells with very little work from your pancreas.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on November 19, 2012
at 01:41 PM

So if you're waiting 3 hours to eat your post-workout meal, you're actually producing more insulin than you would have been 3 hours earlier, and fat burning (not to mention recovery) will be compromised.

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