0

votes

Am I taking unnecessary supplements for weight lifting?

Answered on May 06, 2014
Created May 06, 2014 at 12:53 AM

Olympic lifting 4x/week at 630am (moderate; still learning, its not like 100+ lb weights). My goal is to lean out, and I've been taking up a few supplements to aid the fat loss. I'm just unsure if it's unnecessary?

The thing is; I'm also trying out the Bulletproof intermittent fast. The goal is ketosis, and the mealplan is to "fast" for 18 hours by only consuming fats (coffee with butter and MCT oil).

So, at 530am I mix coffee with BCAAs, Glutamine, and collagen. Post workout, I have another blend of glutamine and BCAAs. I'm told to also consume some more glutamine at night, but I haven't tried that yet. Is this too much or just right for muscle recovery and muscle strength?

Stats:

Female, 26 y/o, 5'5", 168 lbs, 48% body fat,

E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a

(3)

on May 06, 2014
at 04:05 AM

Do you have a recipe for making red cabbage sauerkraut?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on May 06, 2014
at 01:21 AM

48% bodyfat -- no way...

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (0)
  • Views
    1.7K
  • Last Activity
    1538D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

0
E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a

(3)

on May 06, 2014
at 04:51 AM

The evidence that Glutamine and BCAA build muscle is poor. Numerous studies show no difference between placebo and those substances.

There is better evidence that these substance prevent you from *losing* muscle during a diet, or alternately when you have high cortisol levels (as you would if you are under constant stress). Normally high cortisol forces you to eat muscle. Even then, you can find studies arguing both ways. I don't think these substances will hurt you, but you may also be throwing money away.

As I understand you, you will eat your meals that include carbs and protein during a six hour window, and the other 18 hours of the day you only get calories from fat. I don't see a problem with that, and it's interesting because during that 18 hour window you should be able to get deep into ketosis. Wish I had the luxury of trying that out.

What you don't say is how many calories you are allowing yourself on this diet, in total. Is your goal here to lose fat, or to gain muscle? It would be difficult to do both at the same time. More likely the low carb diet will see you lose enormous amounts of water weight and glycogen during the first month, followed by a plateau, and then if you *slightly* restrict calories then you should start losing fat maybe 1/2 to 1 pound per week, and you will lose a little muscle but not nearly the level of fat loss. I'm skinny, and maybe others here can give you realistic weight loss targets.

Low carb diets are diuretics. They cause you to shed sodium and also fluid from the body. With me (probably because I am skinny and just did not have surplus fluid retention), that absolutely annihilated me. I lost energy rapidly and entered into some kind of fatiguing / wasting condition that I am only now beginning to come out of by supplementing sodium (I am still figuring out doses and other electrolytes to include). Watch for that and if you experience significant energy loss then you may need to start testing your electrolytes with a CHEM8 blood panel and managing your electrolyte levels carefully.

My general impression is that ketogenic diets are tricky, and you need to manage a lot of elements correctly. They are being advertised as a kind of free and easy weight loss, with the added benefits of ketones, but the reality is more nuanced. You need to manage electrolytes, make sure to take enough resistant starch to prevent atrophy of gut lining and gut bacteria, and watch your LDL particle counts. (The latter is because of the high lipids, which can cause havoc on LDL for some people, especially those with familial hypercholesterolemia.)

After losing six months of my life to the side effects of this diet, I would say it is the kind of diet that requires a doctor's supervision. The problem is no doctor seems to know squat about low carb diets or how to manage them. So you are really on your own. Hopefully it goes well for you.

0
5b9a25a1a676397a25579dfad59e1d7b

(2318)

on May 06, 2014
at 01:23 AM

I'm generally a believer that you can get most of what your body needs through pure whole food sources, rather than some chemically engineered supplement filled with additives. There are exceptions though of course, and I'm no weight lifter. I would recommend rather than supplementing with powder you try to consume it in its natural state. Glutamine is found in many different foods with the highest levels found in grass-fed beef, bison, chicken, & free range eggs. Raw dairy products from grass-fed cows and goats are also very high in L-glutamine.

Red Cabbage is considered the most dense vegetable form of L-glutamine. An amazing way of bringing in the high quality nutrition from red cabbage is through juicing or shredding & fermenting it. Red cabbage sauerkraut made with apple cider vinegar may be one of the most bioavailable ways to consume L-glutamine; this is due to the deep fermentation processes that create an abundance of enzymes and good bacteria that allow amino acids and other nutrients to be better absorbed and utilized within the body.

E24390f6d880f9144cdf7ab13220a84a

(3)

on May 06, 2014
at 04:05 AM

Do you have a recipe for making red cabbage sauerkraut?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!