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Reducing PUFA "Absorption" with Calorie Restriction/Fasting and Other Strategies

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 30, 2010 at 2:08 AM

After consuming a high O6 diet my entire life, I'm trying to run through my body's stored PUFA. So my question is, if you are aware that you will be eating food deep fried in O6 vegetable oils (social pressure!), would caloric restriction/fasting minimise the damage by preventing the body from adding the O6 to its fat stores?

If so, what would be the most effective way of implementing this strategy? What about eating to satisfaction but staying very low carbohydrate to keep insulin low? Alli notwithstanding, does anyone have any other strategies for reducing O6 "absorption"?

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 09, 2011
at 07:02 PM

I'm a small teenage girl too and my friends used to do this, convinced I had an ED. I ignored them. It might be uncomfortable but I think learning to ignore peer pressure regarding food is really important. I think it's usually more about them than about you- when they're eating crap and you aren't, they feel guilty. Once I realised that it's not my job to make them feel better about their eating habits, it was much easier to ignore the ED accusations. (if I am way off-base here, I apologise. But I think this is a common thing among teen girls.)

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on January 02, 2011
at 11:43 PM

The absolutely crazy thing is this constant pressuring about my eating habits has at times led to behave in a way consistent with an eating disorder, which in turn has led me start questioning my own sanity. For example, if there is cake in the house, I'll secretly cut out a few slices, wrap them in paper towel and hide them at the bottom of the bin, so that it looks believeable when I tell people that I've eaten it. I feel confused and ashamed as this sort of secretive behaviour just isn't me at all, and it only adds to the guilt my family already makes me feel about my food choices.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on January 02, 2011
at 11:32 PM

Thanks for the suggestions everyone. On reflection I can see that I'm approaching this the wrong way. Instead of focusing on scientific strategies to minimise nutritional damage, I should be thinking about psychological/social strategies to minimise the pressure in the first place. I suppose I was initially attracted to the concept of damage limitation since I don't like to make waves, and I understand nutritional science far better than I do this sort of social strategising.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on December 30, 2010
at 05:00 PM

You do not have to eat junk food. It is a choice. I am also a fairly lean teenage girl and my friends were convinced I had an eating disorder till I showed them some of my meals. Stand true to your beliefs and do not eat anything you don't want to.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on December 30, 2010
at 04:00 AM

Simply consume large quantities of meat in front of them. Great for you and they will think you do poorly until they learn better, win-win

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on December 30, 2010
at 02:47 AM

Before a backlog of oh-so-helpful "just don't eat the crap food" answers build up, let me add some background. I'm a petite teenage girl, so regardless of how I attempt to explain them, any restrictions in my diet perceived to be eccentric must of course mean that I have an eating disorder. It doesn't help that two of my female cousins (both the same age) actually have developed eating disorders, which were concealed under self-imposed dietary restrictions (veganism). Due to this I find myself periodically pressured to publicly consume junk food at family events, as a bizarre health ritual.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on December 30, 2010
at 02:35 AM

Be a big boy and don't eat the shit food. Stand the pressure, it's not that big a deal.

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6 Answers

1
58b95ab28f1b859ff1bf898749bb4aea

on June 09, 2011
at 06:15 PM

Stay away from all vegetable oils. Cook everything in either coconut oil or butter. Take a tablespoon or two of coconut oil straight up - it supports your thyroid and also saturated fat protects against PUFAs.

Opt for root vegetables over above ground veggies when possible. Exceptions are tomatoes and peppers, which are actually fruit, as well as cucumbers, zucchini, summer squash and other gourds (pumpkin, squashes, etc.) Make sure you eat them with lots of butter.

Try to get raw milk because it's got a better balance of omega 3:6. Same with grass-fed beef/lamb/bison. Same with free-range eggs. Reduce consumption of chicken, and if you do eat it, try to eat free-range chicken. (Grain-fed animals are higher in PUFA)

Make lots of bone broth (the kind our grandparents/great-grandparents would make from leftover bones). You can get beef soup bones at the supermarket or use leftover chicken/fish bones. Simmer overnight in a pot of water with a little vinegar.

Also see if you can get some gelatin (powdered collagen) - you can find it at greatlakesgelatin.com. It's a super-healing, anti-inflammatory protein. If you get the hydrolized one, you can add it to cold liquids (eg. OJ, milk, etc.) as well as hot. If you get the regular, you can even make your own marshmallows, jello, and gummy worms with it.

Stay away from farmed fish - they feed them soy and other crap. Go for the wild-caught fish, preferably warm water fish, which are lower in PUFA.

Stay away from pork as much as possible, they are mostly grain fed and high-PUFA.

Here is some more info: http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/unsaturatedfats.shtml

Good luck...

1
072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on December 30, 2010
at 03:36 AM

I've personally battled an eating disorder for about 5 years. Worrying about what others think of your eating preferences and then eating food you don't want to eat just to satisfy others is a disorder of sorts. I still consider what others will think (part of my battle) but ultimately find satisfaction in eating plenty of other foods I find appetizing and acceptable. Bring in beef and guacamole to eat and see if anyone thinks you have an eating disorder.

Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on January 02, 2011
at 11:43 PM

The absolutely crazy thing is this constant pressuring about my eating habits has at times led to behave in a way consistent with an eating disorder, which in turn has led me start questioning my own sanity. For example, if there is cake in the house, I'll secretly cut out a few slices, wrap them in paper towel and hide them at the bottom of the bin, so that it looks believeable when I tell people that I've eaten it. I feel confused and ashamed as this sort of secretive behaviour just isn't me at all, and it only adds to the guilt my family already makes me feel about my food choices.

0
50cd66911103fb0074eaaf9d8cea1d80

on March 22, 2012
at 03:02 PM

Take Mixed tocopherols vitamin E.. Antidote with the poison

0
C16d506f10d910db0736bfd0d0e3809a

on January 01, 2011
at 08:51 PM

I take my own food to family gatherings. Homemade jerky, pate' wrapped in bacon, beets, and homemade sauerkraut were several of the things I took to various Christmas gatherings. Some of the other food there included avocados, salad, nuts, etc., but if those aren't on the menu at your gatherings, bring them too. I like to split an avocado in half and just eat it with a spoon; SAD people are really jealous as they count their calories and still feel hungry.

If you can take enough to share, definitely do that. When their mouths are full of delicious rich good fats and healthy fermented food, it doesn't leave a lot of time for them to make up problems you and I don't have!

0
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on December 30, 2010
at 07:22 AM

You shouldn't eat vegetable oil, but if I had to I guess, then eating it without carbs or dairy (which also triggers insulin release) would be better. That said, what is cooked in vegetable oil frequently does have carbs.

0
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on December 30, 2010
at 02:24 AM

I don't believe it would minimize the damage. It would still be inflammatory and induce oxidative stress. The bad effects would just happen sooner rather than later (coming out of fat cells). Either skip the fried foods, or accept the consequences.

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