1

votes

How often did a caveman actually eat?

Answered on April 25, 2015
Created April 19, 2013 at 2:38 PM

I was just thinking of this earlier and was wondering what people's thoughts were....Like did they really eat maybe once a day or less? (I doubt they were having 3 meals a day, were they?) and If so, would it be a bad idea to follow suit? I mean, they were well nourished....would it just be difficult to eat such a large amount at once? what are your thoughts? :)

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:34 PM

right ?

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:34 PM

they just had sex in them

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:44 PM

I switched from supplemental Tuarine to foods naturally high in it (meat,fish,shellfish), while at the same time limiting foods that are abnormally high in Glutamic acid (flours) which may or may not convert into glutamate in the body, which may or may not deplete serum taurine levels over time. In addition to that I'm continuing with my vigorous workouts in order to try to maximize muscle gains so that my body can provide all the amino acids I need regardless of diet.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:18 PM

off topic, but how did the taurine experiment go? I've been supplementing with creatine and ZMA -- absolutely zero benefit that I can tell.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:11 PM

This+ +

  • C2fefd191418f9a7bd691077ab9b527a

    asked by

    (287)
  • Views
    11.2K
  • Last Activity
    1180D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

10 Answers

12
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 19, 2013
at 02:57 PM

First, we don't know whether they were well nourished. Grok fantasies aside, we really don't know whether and which paleolithic groups were nourished/ body composition/ etc. We have assumptions -- some backed by science -- but we do not know.

Second, You are asking the wrong question. Yes it is good to take look through an evolutionary lens. But you should not seek reenactment. You should seek optimal health.

The better question is, "How often should I eat for optimal health?"

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:18 PM

off topic, but how did the taurine experiment go? I've been supplementing with creatine and ZMA -- absolutely zero benefit that I can tell.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:11 PM

This+ +

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:44 PM

I switched from supplemental Tuarine to foods naturally high in it (meat,fish,shellfish), while at the same time limiting foods that are abnormally high in Glutamic acid (flours) which may or may not convert into glutamate in the body, which may or may not deplete serum taurine levels over time. In addition to that I'm continuing with my vigorous workouts in order to try to maximize muscle gains so that my body can provide all the amino acids I need regardless of diet.

3
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on April 20, 2013
at 02:23 AM

I can't imagine any other situation except that meals were sporadic, probably lots of small snacks from gathered items and an occasional big meal, a few times a week, from game. Also probably long periods of hunger, especially in winter.

I do think that it makes sense to follow suit in terms of occasionally fasting and not being bound to scheduled meals. We definitely didn't evolve eating three square meals a day at fixed times. There is lots of evidence that the body does some repair and maintenance when it is not busy digesting food which is surely an evolutionary adaptation to periods of hunger. We also evolved to eat occasional outsized meals and absorb the nutrients and restore our energy stores so that should be part of your diet too.

2
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on April 19, 2013
at 03:15 PM

Would be worth doing some reading about the Hadza: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadza_people

The Hadza are a population of hunter-gatherers living in a savannah-woodland environment in Northern Tanzania; their traditional foraging lifestyle has been documented extensively in previous work. While no living population is a perfect model of our species??? past, the Hadza lifestyle is similar in critical ways to those of our Pleistocene ancestors. Hunter-Gatherer Energetics and Human Obesity. http://bit.ly/13vITKK

The Paleolithic Period spanned two geologic epochs known as the Pliocene and the Pleistocene.

1
2f1cf1541f6d46aa933ebdcdf84bec2a

on April 24, 2013
at 06:58 PM

I really like this question as echoes some questions I've mulled over in my mind a few times. Intermittent fasting (IF) is known to extend lifespan and improve various biomarkers of general health in experimental animals and although the jury is still out on its relevence to human longevity I'm confident enough to practice IF myself (Eat Stop Eat type regimen (Brad Pilon)). The question to me is, when practised in humans are we looking at a therapeutic/preventative intervention to improve health or rather allowing our bodies to function in a manner more akin to their design specifications?

I'm inclined to think the latter (or perhaps a combination) as Grok would have been unlikely to have a continous supply of food though I guess it could have been stored - in a cave maybe :-). Other animals, however, graze but still benefit from an imposed IF protocol. Conventional wisdom would suggest that the mechanism, if it extends to humans, would be conserved from invertebrates to higher mammals but the disparity in (likely) natural feeding patterns leaves for scope a variety of mechanisms.

I wonder if this has implications for the diseases of civilisation and optimal diet in general? Perhaps IF isn't supplementary to health but more fundamental. This raises questions relating to diet composition particularly in those unable or unwilling to fast. For instance, as IF encourages ketonaemia, does limiting carbohydrate intake confer some of the benefits even with more regular meal frequency. Conversely, as a moderate level of ketonaemia suppresses appetite, making fasting easier, did Grok naturally gravitate towards a fat rather carbohydrate rich diet whenever possible?

All speculation, I know, but I just wanted to share my thoughts as see what others think.

1
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on April 20, 2013
at 10:58 PM

Also remember that what we call paleo is not actually what they ate in the past. Food has changed and evolved quite a bit over time.

Here is a video worth watching titled "Debunking the paleo diet" by Christina Warinner at TEDxOU:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMOjVYgYaG8

1
04a4f204bc2e589fa30fd31b92944549

(975)

on April 20, 2013
at 01:31 AM

I think this is actually a really good question and I'm glad you posted it. I see cavemen as wandering around most of the time looking for game, and on their way probably grabbing mushrooms/shoots/leaves/other plant matter that they noticed in passing. That is my theory. I bet they made a big fire every night and cooked the meat. So basically lots of small snacks and one 'actual' meal at the close of the day. Whether this works for you personally, I can't answer that.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 19, 2013
at 05:52 PM

Again, I remember reading about one tribe from the Amazonian rainforest that wasn't Yanomami. I also remember that some anthropologists taught them to grow coffee so they can survive. And if you buy that particular brand of coffee, the proceeds would go to help that tribe.

Anyway, that anthropologist wrote a book about them. She listed their meals and eating habits. For breakfast they had leftovers - they ate very little. For lunch they had something they found in the forest, but not much. For dinner they had the kill of the day. It was their biggest meal.

That's all I remember - sorry I could not help more.

0
9a46ccf8664b8df355e96e79bfc6c5f9

on April 25, 2015
at 06:35 AM

As offten he will see the edible thing.

0
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on April 20, 2013
at 08:17 PM

They didn't actually lives in caves.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:34 PM

they just had sex in them

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on April 20, 2013
at 09:34 PM

right ?

0
37cc142fbb183f2758ef723a192e7a9d

(1353)

on April 20, 2013
at 08:05 PM

Depends what he managed to find/kill. I feel like it probably varied wildly from nothing to too much on a weekly basis but that's just me.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!