5

votes

Fasting workout and reduced hunger afterwards

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 03, 2012 at 10:58 AM

I do not know if you feel the same. When I usually workout in the morning before having breakfast in a fasting state.

Even though I wake up with hunger, after the workout, my hunger is reduced, or at least I perceive it as reduced?

Do you feel the same? Is there a physiological explanation to this?

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 04, 2012
at 07:29 PM

Yes there's a whole lot of physiological stuff going on, but how we interpret that is psychology, by definition. For a lot of people, calling it hunger any time they feel a need to eat is simply unhelpful at best. Even removing all the other factors and looking at actual nutrition, the brain wants you to consume endlessly. Eating isn't always the optimal or even appropriate response.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 04, 2012
at 05:53 PM

I mean, it certainly isn't bad, but it's not very significant. GH isn't really anabolic despite its name, it's mostly responsible for fat liberation which again really isn't that important at physiological doses and it has a delayed effect anyway. If you start injecting GH, then it becomes pretty fat mobilizing. If you combine it with AAS, then it becomes anabolic. Normal physiologic doses, not a big deal. Certainly not as important as the possible negative effects of fasted training.

235259a645be3cac56196e0489dbc8f4

on January 04, 2012
at 08:13 AM

I feel the same way but I have learned that the reduced hunger is only temporary and once I force myself to start eating...I become ravenous and it's hard to stop. I usually get anywhere from 1,000-1,500 calories in this post workout window.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:15 AM

but what about the effects of ghrelin on GH? isn't that a good thing to have more GH?

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:08 AM

Fasted training doesn't work better than non-fasted training. At best it works as well as non-fasted training, but at this point the bulk of the research seems to indicate it's not the case. I know you're thinking of leangains and Martin Berkhan, but the majority of shredded people got that way on a normal eating pattern, and the fact that Martin is a qualified coach who will get results doesn't mean that fasted training is any better.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:07 AM

I wasn't the downvote, but your first point seems to imply it's all psychological. But it's physiological, there's this weird effect where fasting decreases hunger. Same as exercise. But when you eat again, that effect goes away. And it goes away strong (you get very hungry). It's not fake.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on January 04, 2012
at 02:39 AM

dude, its from the endorphin flood, its normal, enjoy it :) !!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Ooh I apologize, there may be no change in total plasma ghrelin but the acylated (active) form does get suppressed.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:08 PM

or this http://www.eje-online.org/content/147/1/65.short

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:05 PM

This study showed exercise had no effect on ghrelin https://www.thieme-connect.com/ejournals/abstract/hmr/doi/10.1055/s-2004-814342

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 03, 2012
at 06:18 PM

Dehydration or an empty stomach.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 03, 2012
at 06:17 PM

Hmmm, the helpful no-comment or alternative answer downvoters strike again. What's so sacrilegious about questioning our learned interpretation of body signals and hormone levels as hunger?

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:12 PM

This. And it only works in the short term. Catecholamines are also worth mentioning. AMPk is one of the things that ensures you get hungry eventually.

2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:40 PM

I experience the same thing. I have also noticed that waking up hungry sometimes is more a sign of dehydration. I know wake up and chug a pint of water, that definetly helps. I also have a cup of coffee too.

9de28a80b0dea81e50495aa5bf28184b

(180)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Ok, but I think that this process may work up to a point, because I sometimes feel ravenous hungry, specially after long workouts or at the evening. Maybe due to hormone cicles

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5 Answers

best answer

1
A942dbc90fe12f7f90744a68f9f223e2

(249)

on January 03, 2012
at 12:27 PM

Exercise decreases ghrelin (which stimulates appetite) levels and increases peptide YY (which suppresses appetite) levels. Google is your friend;-)

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:12 PM

This. And it only works in the short term. Catecholamines are also worth mentioning. AMPk is one of the things that ensures you get hungry eventually.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:08 PM

or this http://www.eje-online.org/content/147/1/65.short

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Ooh I apologize, there may be no change in total plasma ghrelin but the acylated (active) form does get suppressed.

9de28a80b0dea81e50495aa5bf28184b

(180)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Ok, but I think that this process may work up to a point, because I sometimes feel ravenous hungry, specially after long workouts or at the evening. Maybe due to hormone cicles

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:05 PM

This study showed exercise had no effect on ghrelin https://www.thieme-connect.com/ejournals/abstract/hmr/doi/10.1055/s-2004-814342

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 03, 2012
at 10:38 PM

I agree at least partially with Jeff. When I exercise (I can't call what I do working out) I'm never hungry afterward and I think it's because I'm in high-powered fat-burning mode.

I have learned to eat after a couple of hours, though, even if I'm still not feeling very hungry because if I don't I'm too hungry the next day. To keep things nice and level I make sure I eat a nourishing meal at about my regular time. I'm glad for it later and there's no extra hunger the next day.

0
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 04, 2012
at 02:40 AM

dude, its from the endorphin flood, its normal, enjoy it :) !!

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 03, 2012
at 10:20 PM

I've found the same thing. I believe the answer is due at least in part to the hormones released during exercise (cortisol, epinephrine) cause your body to start burning fat and your liver to increase blood sugar.

edit: This is interesting, ghrelin is a potent stimulator of growth hormone. maybe this is why fasted training works so well.

Ghrelin has been shown to exert a very potent and specific GH-releasing activity both in vivo and in vitro.... In fact, from the limited available data it seems that it is, at least in humans, the most potent GH releaser ever described. As expected, it appears that Ghrelin and GHRH exhibited a synergistic effect in terms of GH secretion.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11408755

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 04, 2012
at 05:53 PM

I mean, it certainly isn't bad, but it's not very significant. GH isn't really anabolic despite its name, it's mostly responsible for fat liberation which again really isn't that important at physiological doses and it has a delayed effect anyway. If you start injecting GH, then it becomes pretty fat mobilizing. If you combine it with AAS, then it becomes anabolic. Normal physiologic doses, not a big deal. Certainly not as important as the possible negative effects of fasted training.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:08 AM

Fasted training doesn't work better than non-fasted training. At best it works as well as non-fasted training, but at this point the bulk of the research seems to indicate it's not the case. I know you're thinking of leangains and Martin Berkhan, but the majority of shredded people got that way on a normal eating pattern, and the fact that Martin is a qualified coach who will get results doesn't mean that fasted training is any better.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:15 AM

but what about the effects of ghrelin on GH? isn't that a good thing to have more GH?

-1
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 03, 2012
at 11:21 AM

It's common, and essentially it's because you're not hungry. We've just gotten used to being very lazy and superficial in our relationship to food and energy.

If the logs are still smouldering then a good puff of wind can get the flames burning again. Breakfast is just lighter fluid.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 03, 2012
at 06:17 PM

Hmmm, the helpful no-comment or alternative answer downvoters strike again. What's so sacrilegious about questioning our learned interpretation of body signals and hormone levels as hunger?

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on January 04, 2012
at 03:07 AM

I wasn't the downvote, but your first point seems to imply it's all psychological. But it's physiological, there's this weird effect where fasting decreases hunger. Same as exercise. But when you eat again, that effect goes away. And it goes away strong (you get very hungry). It's not fake.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 04, 2012
at 07:29 PM

Yes there's a whole lot of physiological stuff going on, but how we interpret that is psychology, by definition. For a lot of people, calling it hunger any time they feel a need to eat is simply unhelpful at best. Even removing all the other factors and looking at actual nutrition, the brain wants you to consume endlessly. Eating isn't always the optimal or even appropriate response.

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