8

votes

Do our bodies (specifically insulin) get used to fasting?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 07, 2011 at 4:20 PM

If someone is insulin resistant and uses fasting to help rebuild sensitivity (let's say a 1-meal-a-day approach), would their insulin levels really quickly become sensitive again, or would it adapt to these long fasting periods (and remain a bit insensitive)? Also--I feel like one could become more and more insulin insensitive (with increasingly bad dietary habits) but can it become TOO sensitive (VLC plus lots of fasting)? And would leptin react in similar ways?

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:57 AM

but on vlc the ir repairs itself if you just binge out for a few days, if you are healthy metabolically

164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853

(495)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:01 AM

Don't feed 'em after midnight!!!

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 24, 2011
at 01:31 AM

Gremlin signaling. Gotta watch those gremlins! Cute typo ;)

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:29 AM

Oops Grehlin, love the autocorrect

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:28 AM

Grehlin is definitely trained to meal timing.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:26 AM

Yes! There are multiple studies showing that gremlin signaling is entrained to meal timing

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on November 26, 2011
at 01:46 AM

Henry, it could be that both are right - one way doesn't necessarily fit all.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on November 26, 2011
at 01:45 AM

There's also claimed hormonal response to consistently eating at a certain time of day, although I have no references to back that up.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 26, 2011
at 01:39 AM

Right, VLC makes you insulin resistant because it's trying to protect your brain, which needs glucose. So if in response to insulin, and skeletal muscles or fat cells shunted glucose for storage, your brain and red blood cells wouldn't have enough. Perfectly normal to be somewhat insulin resistant on VLC.

7d5d98a0453db2ae67358a3169888aca

(263)

on October 28, 2011
at 11:30 PM

Blood type? How and why.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 27, 2011
at 10:39 AM

VLC by nature will make your more insulin resitant

279700a1070c65fc144eceaa642dcbc7

(144)

on July 07, 2011
at 07:46 PM

Could you be more clear? Insulin levels don't become resistant or sensitive - tissue does. And what would being too insulin sensitive look like?

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on July 07, 2011
at 07:18 PM

I'm very interested in some responses. This question could have also been titled Martin Berkhan vs. Art Devany. Berkhan recommends the 16/8 daily fast while Devany is big on randomization. They both make good points.

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5 Answers

1
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on December 24, 2011
at 01:36 AM

While your body is 'adapting' to fasting its tissues are becoming more sensitive to insulin. I honestly do not know if there are any clinical studies that can correlate adaption to fasting and sensitivity to insulin, or even if that is possible. Some things that are certain which pertain to your questions are this:

'Adaption' to fasting. Your insulin levels go down and glucagon levels go up and blood sugar stabilizes. Once much of the glucose in your blood stream and glucose in your liver is used up your body ups enzymes to release and burn triglycerides as free fatty acids. Also, your liver starts making ketone bodies primarily for fuel for your brain.

I think I see that one of your questions is whether or not a human will become more insulin resistant (insensitive) if fasting, and the answer is no, in fact, it works the other way around.

There is no such thing as being 'too sensitive' to insulin. In a depleted state, insulin sensitivity is a good thing, moving glucose into muscles, the liver and FFA into fat. As a person looses body fat, their body becomes better at nutrient partitioning.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 10, 2011
at 01:13 AM

I won't speak to insulin resistance, because I'm not sure about my past and present status other than I've never been officially diagnosed as a diabetic.

I'm sure I was leptin resistant when I joined this lifestyle last April but by the number of waist inches lost I think I'm cooking on all burners now.

To answer your question, my body tries very hard to adapt to whatever I do:

  • Eat junk food constantly? Always hungry for junk food
  • Eat ancestrally? Junk food not appealing (okay, that took about 6 months) and fruit is a heavenly dessert
  • Eat once per day? No hunger until the time I usually eat
  • Eat at 9 am and in the afternoon? By the 3rd morning, I'm hungry at 9
  • Too busy to eat? Since I don't normally eat much after 4, not hungry that evening or before 9 the next day

The only serious disagreement between me and my gut is that it refuses to tolerate my wheat habit any longer. Other items appear to be negotiable.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 24, 2011
at 01:31 AM

Gremlin signaling. Gotta watch those gremlins! Cute typo ;)

164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853

(495)

on December 24, 2011
at 02:01 AM

Don't feed 'em after midnight!!!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:26 AM

Yes! There are multiple studies showing that gremlin signaling is entrained to meal timing

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:29 AM

Oops Grehlin, love the autocorrect

0
5640e925e1139f1d9b2460a1e1c51d26

on November 14, 2012
at 10:54 PM

I just started fasting and a friend told me to look into insulin sensity too. Found this video on YouTube today http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKJXBTeBrgU&feature=colike

looks like fasting helps with insulin?

0
5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on October 27, 2011
at 05:02 AM

There's definitely some physiological adaptation to the routine in which you eat, but I doubt fasting would have a negative effect on insulin or leptin sensitivity.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on November 26, 2011
at 01:45 AM

There's also claimed hormonal response to consistently eating at a certain time of day, although I have no references to back that up.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:28 AM

Grehlin is definitely trained to meal timing.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 27, 2011
at 04:42 AM

You have to combine fasting with the right balance of foods for your body/blood type and also eat the right amount of carbs & exercise. OTOH Martin Berkhan the Leangains guy says insulin is well regulated. I hear people say all the time they can't fast because it "causes blood sugar swings" but this isn't my experience. As long as I eat paleo and use good sense with carbs I don't get a blood sugar response to food. The day after my meal I can be hungry a little depending on calorie/carb load but I find it goes away after a few hours. I do the Warrior Diet meal cycle of daily undereating/overeating.

Jack Kruse the leptin doctor says fasting is bad if you have leptin resistance but I disagree.

So in general no, I think fasting improves insulin because it helps lower it. You can't be "too insulin sensitive." Low calorie dieting doesn't make sense with fasting because you would constantly be hungry. Read the Warrior Diet and Eat Stop Eat by Brad Pilon. It's all about getting control of your blood sugar and hunger.

7d5d98a0453db2ae67358a3169888aca

(263)

on October 28, 2011
at 11:30 PM

Blood type? How and why.

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