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Where does the asymptote lie for diminishing returns on exercise duration under various levels of intensity?

Commented on April 28, 2014
Created April 28, 2014 at 4:08 PM

Where does the asymptote lie for diminishing returns on exercise duration under various levels of intensity?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 28, 2014
at 06:03 PM

Thanks CD, I like how you said that the presence of lactate could suggest we've crossed the low-activity threshold.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 28, 2014
at 05:20 PM

from previous questions. The result is longevity.

Also, I would not assume a bell curve.

3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on April 28, 2014
at 05:17 PM

If results are a function of time (where effort and performance are constants) I'd be surprised if the graph didn't look like a bell curve. In which case I assume what you're probably talking about is the horizontal asymptote at y = 0 where, if crossed, we start getting negative returns. Although, what I think you mean is, "when does the derivative turn negative" (the top of the bell).

Either way what needs to be defined is "results" before we can even begin tackling the question. A good question to start on, however.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 28, 2014
at 05:16 PM

I would propose that the presence of lactate suggests that we have crossed a threshold of low-level activity. Should the body be able to quickly expunge that lactate, then there would be no lingering effects. Heart Rate is correlated to blood lactate, but is more linear than lactate is -- thus it'd be an indirect measure of muscle energy expenditure.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 28, 2014
at 05:00 PM

Why do you say that residual lactate acid would be a better direct measure than heart rate zones?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 28, 2014
at 04:12 PM

hahaha!

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1 Answers

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3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on April 28, 2014
at 04:28 PM

As you know, I am big on utilizing heart rate zones. I think the are extremely effective, and essentially free measures. Certainly residual lactate acid would be a better direct measure, but certainly more difficult to measure.

While I have no hard data, I would assume that there does not reach a limit (assuming reasonable rest and recovery ~8-10 hours day) going from zone 1 to zone 2 would provide a negative effect on longevity. However zone 3 would have an upper limit, and it becomes exponentially worse the longer and higher you move up the heart range. However, I do not believe that we could answer that with certainty -- The problem with the science out there is that (1) It is never a placebo controlled study (how would you even do that?) (2) It is usually observational (3) We lack appropriate tatical measures to guage long term effects.

[soap box] Chronic cardio is not jogging. Chronic cardio is prolonged exertion of Zone 4 and Zone 5 without recovery. Marathon training, for most, is not disasterous for health. Marathon training, for elite athletes, is. [/soap box]

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on April 28, 2014
at 05:00 PM

Why do you say that residual lactate acid would be a better direct measure than heart rate zones?

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