4

votes

Track and field sprinting vs. Tabata-based HIT

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 04, 2010 at 6:59 PM

Are there any competitive track and field sprinters (or former sprinters) out there that incorporate HIT based training into their workouts. Based on the short recovery times recommended by Tabata, it seems it could actually inhibit speed development rather than make you faster out of the blocks and down to the first 50-60 meters. Sprinting for 20 seconds is roughly an elite time in the 200m. Running that again in 10 seconds must wreak havoc on your CNS and ability to maintain sprinting form.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:32 PM

'ppreciate your input

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:32 PM

Usain Bolt is such a freak there is no point even analyzing him. He took his crew out to Mickey D's after winning gold in Beijing ...

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:31 PM

Thanks, I am going to dig and see what cats like Asafa Powell, Tyson Gay or Allyson Felix do regarding HIT.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:30 PM

Results speak for themselves. Thanks.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:30 PM

Thanks doc. I will look into that.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 04, 2010
at 10:33 PM

I'll check it out - thanks Patrik

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on June 04, 2010
at 09:20 PM

Great question. Have you seen Keith Norris' blog? He would be a great resource to ask about that. http://theorytopractice.wordpress.com/

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4 Answers

2
207d50cbebb119a4b000a91e988ac2ac

on June 04, 2010
at 08:48 PM

Faster out of the blocks? No. But I believe that it does have a very positive affect on being able to maintain top end speed longer (sprint endurance), which is beneficial in a longer sprint such as the 200m. I use tabata sprints as a part of my speed training programs with positive results. There is definitely a deleterious effect on form over the course of a tabata sprint workout, but that effect decreases as greater endurance is developed.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:32 PM

'ppreciate your input

2
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on June 04, 2010
at 08:34 PM

I'm not a sprinter, but it seems that you answered your own question--too much tabata training can interfere with speed and form in sprinting. Optimal training techniques are specific to the requirements of your sport of choice. Tabatas increase your ability to repeatedly apply power over time, which is also known as "speed endurance." Speed endurance training differs from pure sprint training in that the repetition phase is longer, but the recovery phase is shorter (ie., incomplete recovery) ( http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/speedendurance.html ). Tabatas are great training for soccer, hockey, basketball, football, and life in general, but not for the 100m.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:30 PM

Thanks doc. I will look into that.

1
D5ae33b2c8e31a783fb96f3a27e1dae8

(10)

on June 07, 2010
at 12:57 AM

In my fourth year on the HS track team, the new sprinters' coach had three types of workouts: aerobic, anaerobic, and technique. We commonly (i.e. once or twice a week) did HIT running, similar to Tabata's, but not quite at that level. As long as this type of training is balanced with other forms of training, such as form and power, it can have dramatic effects on performance. Let's just say in our first meet (against two other schools) we tripled the amount of victories in my high school career.

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:30 PM

Results speak for themselves. Thanks.

1
624739a8bc118c0f5f03a25c2d68cfaa

on June 05, 2010
at 03:47 AM

For me I feel like it allows you to push through a higher lactic acid threshold. Thus, when you are just about spent but have another 20m, you have the ability to keep the turnover quick and push your muscles to a point that you normally would fail. I find with Tabatas I can really tell quickly if I'm getting better based on my recovery time and turnover. Tabatas can be helpful when interval training or what we in the world of track and country refer to as "repeats" are not an option. Unfortunately because tabatas do not replicate the "out of the box" feeling or position you cannot pick up speed fast enough to get that "high".

My track/cross country coach used to say the fastest way to get in shape was to run hill repeats. It gets your body used to performing in the "uncomfortable". The key is with tabata that you get to the uncomfortable at about the 4th-5th interval, so you need to maintain where you normally would say "stop, I can't go anymore". At that point, it is where you can really gain that competitive portion and the visualization aspect of pushing past the other runner or "quick feet" comes into play and gets you beyond the average persons lactic acid threshold.

Just one person's opinion :) BTW, I was sprinter in HS (100m/200m/relay), cross-country...5K tomorrow (without training) hahaha. Oh and most importantly paleozone crossfitter for my most important event, figure shows. Yea I'm confused?!?!?!

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:32 PM

Usain Bolt is such a freak there is no point even analyzing him. He took his crew out to Mickey D's after winning gold in Beijing ...

002d63c0ab8bfe4a20b6eb14944f0e22

on June 09, 2010
at 04:31 PM

Thanks, I am going to dig and see what cats like Asafa Powell, Tyson Gay or Allyson Felix do regarding HIT.

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