2

votes

Sprints.. and WHY is it more than just a sore body

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 07, 2011 at 12:31 PM

I have run off and on my whole life, typically being able to do most 5 k races with no problem. I usually love to work out, lifting and keeping more muscle, but after running some sprints I felt like I had been shot, everything was major sore, back and shins, even my feet. Any one with history of doing sprints, and help me understand what its doing to the body

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on October 21, 2011
at 10:00 PM

This .

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on July 07, 2011
at 08:53 PM

Physical Therapists that specialize in running injuries have the ability to do so as do elite running stores, and sports medicine clinics. Video, treadmills, pressure pads, as well as someone watching you run, are used assess your gait, where the most impact is, etc. I went from being a neutral runner to a pronator. Changing my shoe helped quite a bit and CF improved my posture so altogether good results.

8be12378a6d810513f69643e21218998

(153)

on July 07, 2011
at 06:56 PM

How do you get your gait checked?

16cd12d7208203f231632d38249e39b9

(110)

on July 07, 2011
at 06:42 PM

Futureboy - Oh, I think there are a million reasons to sprint. Energy level, sleep, attitude, all of which you mentioned. And there's so much more that I love. But study after study of centenarians shows fairly clearly that the "secret" to longevity is quality food, a playful & social life, and staying active as much as possible throughout the day. For the most part, being active means walking, casual sports, etc. Sprinting is great, but I've not seen a link to increased lifespan.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:28 PM

It depends what my goal was

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:27 PM

agreed. This is the best logic. I want a sprinter's body and attitude, not a moody 5k runner.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:26 PM

and which one looks happier also

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:26 PM

would you rather have the body of a 5K runner, or a sprinter?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:27 PM

Dude, great answer! But I think there must be some sort of longevity benefit from sprinting. When I'm being consistent with my sprint interval schedule I feel more alert, happier and stronger during the course of subsequent days. Not only that, but I SLEEP so much better too!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:03 PM

The hill also makes your form better, you have to keep your feet under you.

B61f6513a155cd874b42efdad55312f6

(231)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:33 PM

http://tobecomealegend.blogspot.com/2009/08/5-benefits-of-hill-sprints.html 1-burn more calories 2-increased resistance, increases strength gains 3-safer than flat sprinting, since you don't move as fast/out of control Their last two points are just opinions. More bang for your buck in hill sprints.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:19 PM

what does the hill do?

B61f6513a155cd874b42efdad55312f6

(231)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:05 PM

or do them on a hill.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 07, 2011
at 12:36 PM

no history of sprinting here, sorry. But i would posit that it is merely a new way of using a lot of heretofor under-recruited muscles, perhaps at the same time, that is a real shock to your system, resulting of course in soreness.

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13 Answers

9
16cd12d7208203f231632d38249e39b9

on July 07, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Big thing here is form. If you're going straight from heel-to-toe jogging to heel-to-toe sprinting, you'll be in pain all over, especially if your shoulders and hips aren't aligned.

There's a soreness curve to learning every new movement. However, if you're in real pain, you're doing something wrong. The goal of exercise is to make you more likely to survive tomorrow, not less likely because you're demolished from the day before. Do not listen to anyone who says you should be exhausted or in pain a day or even two days after. Again, slight soreness is one thing. Pain is another.

Here's what I tell my friends and clients to do for sprinting.

If you're a distance runner, sprint two days per week, distance run one day per week. If you're NOT a distance runner, sprint two days per week, and cross train (rowing, jump rope, swimming) 1 - 2 days per week.

IF SPRINTING ON A DREADMILL:

Set the incline to 3 or higher, but not so high you feel like you're climbing a hill. Some people say an incline of 1 is fine. They're wrong. Use the speed "interval" setting to switch between a comfortable "jogging" speed and sprints. If you don't see a speed interval setting... well, that sucks. The low speed should be just fast enough that you have to pay attention to your walking. If you're reading a book, you're doing it wrong. Whenever you're warmed up, crank up the speed for a 30-second sprint. If you're new to sprinting, underestimate yourself for the first couple of sprints, and make sure that your hips are over the point of contact on the belt, and that you are landing either mid foot or front foot. Listen to the sound you're making. If you can hear a "thud" as your foot falls, you're landing too hard. Work on stepping light. You won't hurt anything that way. Gradually increase speed after you've gotten form down, but continue to sprint for 30 seconds at a time. Aim for about 8 sprints. "Recovery" between sprints is pretty a personal thing, but I strongly suggest that you try another sprint the instant you start wondering whether or not it is time to try another sprint. Learn your body.

IF SPRINTING IN THE REAL WORLD

Walk briskly for a while. When you're ready to sprint STOP MOVING. With feet should width apart, lean forward from your ankles. When your foot comes out to keep you from falling, just keep going. Land either midfoot or on the front. Again, start slowly, and concentrate on the sound of your feet hitting the ground. If you hear thudding, you're probably running incorrectly. Check that hips are over the point of contact with the ground.

Whatever you do, keep your head up high and have fun. There's no real longevity benefit from sprinting. It's more about having a good time.

16cd12d7208203f231632d38249e39b9

(110)

on July 07, 2011
at 06:42 PM

Futureboy - Oh, I think there are a million reasons to sprint. Energy level, sleep, attitude, all of which you mentioned. And there's so much more that I love. But study after study of centenarians shows fairly clearly that the "secret" to longevity is quality food, a playful & social life, and staying active as much as possible throughout the day. For the most part, being active means walking, casual sports, etc. Sprinting is great, but I've not seen a link to increased lifespan.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:27 PM

Dude, great answer! But I think there must be some sort of longevity benefit from sprinting. When I'm being consistent with my sprint interval schedule I feel more alert, happier and stronger during the course of subsequent days. Not only that, but I SLEEP so much better too!

7
65125edd5aafad39b3d5b3a8b4a36bb7

on July 07, 2011
at 04:23 PM

Sprinting is extremely taxing on the central-nervous system, owing to the fact that the CNS is required to synchronize and optimize output of all of the involved tissues to generate maximum force.

When undergoing normal tissue repair during sleep or rest, the CNS will probably get first dibs since it is the most important system in your body. It's likely that other tissues with lower priority do not receive as much attention. It could take far longer for your CNS to recover from maximum effort sessions than a normal workout.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on October 21, 2011
at 10:00 PM

This .

4
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 07, 2011
at 12:35 PM

I've heard about a lot of people getting messed up from sprints because they have poor form and push themselves to their muscular limits and end up doing damage to muscle or bones.

Sprints are good if you do them with good form. Probably one of those things where you want to start off in small doses and gradually bump it up.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:19 PM

what does the hill do?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:26 PM

would you rather have the body of a 5K runner, or a sprinter?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:26 PM

and which one looks happier also

B61f6513a155cd874b42efdad55312f6

(231)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:33 PM

http://tobecomealegend.blogspot.com/2009/08/5-benefits-of-hill-sprints.html 1-burn more calories 2-increased resistance, increases strength gains 3-safer than flat sprinting, since you don't move as fast/out of control Their last two points are just opinions. More bang for your buck in hill sprints.

B61f6513a155cd874b42efdad55312f6

(231)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:05 PM

or do them on a hill.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on July 07, 2011
at 03:03 PM

The hill also makes your form better, you have to keep your feet under you.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:28 PM

It depends what my goal was

3
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:03 PM

I use to be a daily distance runner too and I dropped that when I went primal. I've just started picking up on sprints but I'm doing it slowly and working up. Starting with (4) only to start with and each week I'll add one or two more. I had already anticipated soreness because i have noticed my muscles are kind of weak, even my back feels in and out sometimes.

I have also noticed body soreness all over (even neck shoulders), I think because I'm going all out and I'm also physically not in shape for sprints. As Mindi said it is a different movement, I do tend to feel myself tighter and less relaxed than a long run.

Maybe back it down a bit and work back up to your desired # of sprints over a few weeks? The soreness should go away once your muscles get use to the movement, just like any new exercise. Also an indicator that you are using every muscle!!!

Sprint onward and upward (a hill that is)!!!!

3
Aeec781cc234fcae119d4a71532058f5

(2047)

on July 07, 2011
at 12:42 PM

I'm far from an exercise expert, but here's my 2 cents: When I sprint, my body moves very differently from how it moves when I jog. My arms swing with a lot more purpose, my feet strike the ground differently, and I have a longer stride which would use muscles differently. Just like any other new exercise, you have to build up to it.

I have less pain if I work up to the sprint...start jogging for a few steps and gradually increase speed til I'm sprinting. I also do at least a 5 minute walk to warm up.

I hate running, but I love walking with sprint intervals thrown in. Good luck!

2
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on July 07, 2011
at 01:53 PM

When I was swimming we would have group runs with sprints, before tapering down for races, and if I missed a couple of runs and jumped back in, the results were pretty similar to what you're describing which was basically overdoing it. What coach had me do, and what I've started doing now, is a little bit of speed play aka Fartlek. Instead of a 20 second sprint I use the unstructured faster paced running so I can maintain during my higher intensity training. For me, it's been a great way to build that base back up with less painful results. Stretch before and after, but you already know this :) and maintaining good levels of vitamins c/b1/potassium/calcium will also help with recovery. Oh! And have you had your gait checked lately? Mine actually changed and I've had to go to a more structured shoe. Weird but the change helped immensely. Good luck!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on July 07, 2011
at 08:53 PM

Physical Therapists that specialize in running injuries have the ability to do so as do elite running stores, and sports medicine clinics. Video, treadmills, pressure pads, as well as someone watching you run, are used assess your gait, where the most impact is, etc. I went from being a neutral runner to a pronator. Changing my shoe helped quite a bit and CF improved my posture so altogether good results.

8be12378a6d810513f69643e21218998

(153)

on July 07, 2011
at 06:56 PM

How do you get your gait checked?

2
34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:30 PM

Sprinting uses a lot more muscles than just running or jogging. There is an intensity that taxes the entire body when you sprint. Just look at the difference in body composition between a distance runner and a sprinter, it's night and day. It's going to hurt and you're going to be exhausted afterward.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 07, 2011
at 04:27 PM

agreed. This is the best logic. I want a sprinter's body and attitude, not a moody 5k runner.

2
A088f10fe82d3e84f6a8fb8b2be9cc77

(60)

on July 07, 2011
at 01:05 PM

go barefoot slowly it helps

1
Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:43 PM

Sprinting is different than jogging because "force = mass x acceleration".

By moving your body (mass) at a much faster rate (acceleration) there are exponentially greater forces impacting your body.

When your foot hits the ground (ground reaction force) and equal amount of energy is sent back up through your body. In an ideal situation, much of that energy is taken in and used to drive subsequent movements, effectively distributing the energy back through the body without accruing damage.

Back, knee, and other orthopedic pain resulting from sprinting means that there are imbalances and these "weak points" are absorbing a disproportionate amount of force.

By learning proper sprinting technique, strength training, and with a targeted program of corrective exercise you can make your body more efficient at absorbing and reapplying force and thereby making sprinting safer and more effective.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 08, 2011
at 02:48 AM

I hate running but sprinting held promise and it was enjoyable. Until I experienced back and knee pain. At that point I discovered trail running. I'm telling ya, it is a blast but the workout encompasses so much. There is a technical aspect of making sure you avoid rocks, bushes and the like which keeps me mentally alert. The technical aspect has me using more parts of my body and in different ways while I have to concentrate on my balance. There is jumping involved too. I found that this is more intense but I don't get sore like with sprinting. In a way it is similar to movnat. There is a lot of core engagement too.

Plus its just super fun and never boring.

1
Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

on July 07, 2011
at 03:11 PM

Like everything else workout related, ease into it and focus on your form or you'll stress your body too much.

Sprinting is a much more full body workout than distance running, which is why everyone should do it occasionally.

1
4e813fcf7266312684862b945c1c3281

(462)

on July 07, 2011
at 02:16 PM

You will get sore from any new exercise, or when you increase duration or intensity of an existing exercise. It's perfectly normal until your body starts to adapt to taht level of workload.

0
4e6eb64e86d5373f8fb12ea8058b0e3a

on October 21, 2011
at 10:47 AM

gyday ..

mate try "run throughs".....not full on sprinting...just about 50-70% of fastest pace...

do 10-15-20 pushups and from the finish position of last pushup 'take off' very fast over 5m then back it off to 50-70%......

if you can..do it uphill......over 100-200mtrs....just focus on rythm and synergy...not all out speed...be 'fluid and poised'..not a flashing psycho of arms and legs.....

and you will lose body fat..increase heart health..lung capacity....build muscles...

peace.

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