4

votes

Specific exercise regimen?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 04, 2010 at 4:58 PM

Besides the diet, what do you do to stay fit? Does anyone have a formal regime, like crossfit, or just informal stuff like walking more?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Yeesh, crossfit, Starting Strength, and martial arts all in one week?

A329ac44674ac574d29d05e70e9a1f2f

(60)

on April 15, 2011
at 08:45 AM

According to the aptly titled book "Born to Run", in fact we may just have evolved to run significant distances. There you go - more paleo than you thought!

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on May 07, 2010
at 05:18 PM

I like the "canonical" part, as well as the non-dogmatic sensibility of this.

0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on May 05, 2010
at 02:17 AM

¥es. Training is my cruel mistress.

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18 Answers

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4
199e1758b73a72416fba6c10a55f93f3

(203)

on May 05, 2010
at 06:01 PM

From what I gather on the internet some strength training, a lot of walking / cycling and occasional sprinting is the canonical "paleo" excercise regimen.

So I do something like that.

Half an hour of weight training a week,

One or two (ok, one, usually) tabata sprints (look them up - they take all of five minutes but really wear you out)

And a long walk or two.

I'm not big, strong and muscular, of course, but healthy enough and can run a short distance or lift an occasional heavy object when the need arises.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on May 07, 2010
at 05:18 PM

I like the "canonical" part, as well as the non-dogmatic sensibility of this.

2
E049da9fe1bf596ec3c894d51ad7ae41

(195)

on May 08, 2010
at 02:28 AM

I do the Big Five workout in Doug McGuff's book, "Body by Science." This is an intense, ~10-15 minute, full-body workout once per week. Simple and medicinal. I've had FANTASTIC gains in strength and endurance with it over the last couple of months. Sometimes I also do a little jogging on other days of the week, but this is optional, and I just do it because it feels good.

2
485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

on May 04, 2010
at 09:02 PM

I find training boring and unpleasant, and I feel no particular need to be strong, just healthy, which is taken care of by my diet. Walking has helped me lose weight and I continue to do so. I also enjoy mountain biking, hiking, and tennis. I like to be outdoors and have fun. When I get down to the weight where I look like a man again I'll also get back into swimming.

1
58886b69e16fd8b6cafd83c521bbf6b9

on May 08, 2010
at 06:29 PM

I do crossfit WOD's usually three times per week, and then the Starting Strength program of 5x5 heavy lifting on the major lifts - squat, press, and deadlift. Parkour and gymnastics are some of the workouts that I throw in for variety. I also make an effort to walk to the grocery store/gym/library whenever possible, and not rely on the car.

1
6b61d8a45ce6a9741cff86b59b21f825

(40)

on May 06, 2010
at 11:28 PM

CrossFit, Krav Maga and general goofing around with my body. keeps me feeling good.

1
4c9ce32229b4c1be9cccf01e141cdb66

on May 04, 2010
at 09:44 PM

Monkey bar gym is awesome despite their vegan diet recommendations. They post workouts every day and help you improve monthly. I do their workouts 2-3 times per week. http://monkeybargym.com/full-body-workouts.html

I try to incorporate some more balance/strength work from Ido Portal's stuff 2 times per week. http://idoportal.blogspot.com/

Every other day I do (2-3 times per month "hot") yoga! Which I think is a must for everyone! If there is one activity which has helped me in every other physical endeavor I have ever attempted it is yoga.

1
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on May 04, 2010
at 08:38 PM

Fred Hahn's Slow Burn technique is my exercise of choice. Slow Burn is basically a cross between weight lifting and Tai Chi - very (very) slow movements using free weights. The idea is, when you are strength training, you want to avoid letting momentum or gravity do any of the work for you, and moving extremely slowly and deliberately forces your muscles to do all the work.

I've been at it for a couple of months now (twice a week) and am seeing great results. I'll have to sell tickets to the gun show before long. ;)

http://www.seriousstrength.com

http://www.amazon.com/Slow-Burn-Fitness-Revolution-Exercise/dp/0767913868/ref=pd_sim_b_4

1
703331bec3d551d21d2178f60c9963c1

on May 04, 2010
at 06:23 PM

I play sports and do a varied strength/power/conditioning program. I play competitive tennis as well as recreational skiing, basketball, golf, hiking, windsurfing in the summer.

For structured fitness, I have a basic template that I use about 4 times a week.

  1. Warm Up/Mobility/Skill - Hip/shoulder flexibility, light rowing, kettlebell juggling, handstands, snatch practice, overhead squats, basically whatever is non taxing and high skill
  2. Strength/Power Lift - Usually anywhere from 3-7 sets of 2-5 reps of a big lift like back squat, deadlift, power clean, push press, press, push jerk, clean and jerk, good morning, RDL, track sprint work. I might do 2 of these in one workout when I feel fresh.
  3. Assistance Lift - Something less CNS taxing like pullups, dips, muscle ups, glute ham raises, barbell rollouts, hanging leg raises, handstand pushups
  4. High Intensity Conditioning - this will be low skill movements done in intervals or a short timed circuit like kettlebell swings/cleans/snatches, row sprint intervals, weighted keg or odd object carries, bodyweight circuits like a 'mini Cindy' in crossfit. Typically less than 10 minutes total but at very high intensity.
  5. Recovery - Stretching, foam rolling, contrast shower, good meal

I like this because it doesn't lock me into a certain repetitive program and it gives me a lot of flexibility when it comes to which days I train and which days I don't. Also I think it avoids overtraining and stalling since I'm rotating exercises a lot. And it's just plain fun to do lots of different stuff!

1
8347d512bca9b034d53da40dab8cd21c

on May 04, 2010
at 05:10 PM

I was an endurance runner before I started Paleo in January, and despite the fact that Grok didn't run half-marathons himself, I'm still doing that. :)

Most weeks, my exercise consists of:

  • CrossFit training four times a week (usually once a day on four different days)
  • running/walking/biking on the days I can't make training
  • yes, the occasional rest day in there to heal
  • work, which is me standing for 8+ hours lifting, moving, feeding people dessert.

I space out races to give myself something to train for (on top of good physical fitness). I've got a few coming up in the next months through September, at which point I'd either travel out of town to do other races, or just do more CrossFit training indoors until the Spring (and nicer weather).

A329ac44674ac574d29d05e70e9a1f2f

(60)

on April 15, 2011
at 08:45 AM

According to the aptly titled book "Born to Run", in fact we may just have evolved to run significant distances. There you go - more paleo than you thought!

0
535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 15, 2011
at 12:21 AM

10-20 minutes of conditioning work, some core work, power lifting 5X5 one exercise. I do this every other day rotating different exercises for variety. The idea is to get in and out of the gym as quickly as possible. 40 years of experience has taught me most people over-train. Do half as much but double your effort, and have more rest days.

0
699d8d5bb5d186c23c79aef4f7bf1145

on May 06, 2010
at 08:19 PM

I build my training around the idea that, no matter what, I go heavy at least twice a week and hard at least once a week. Any more than that is ok depending on how I feel. As soon as I begin to feel sick, weak, or injured I take a deloading week.

Going heavy: squat, deadlift, snatch, clean & jerk, press, weighted dips, and weighted pullups.

Going hard: crossfit metcon wods (fran, cindy, helen, fight gone bad, etc...), sprints (50, 100, 200, or 400m), rowing, running hills or stairs.

In addition to this, I work on bodyweight strength stuff (ring dips and pull ups, handstand push ups, l-sits) as a warm up and cool down at each training session.

Training for me is never boring or unpleasant, which is why I hate the idea of "working out". I look forward to each training session and find the pursuit of my strength and conditioning goals rewarding and on some days even spiritual. After all, it was through training that I discovered the whole paleo concept.

0
5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on May 06, 2010
at 08:23 AM

I've built myself a little gym at home and I've been slowly adding weight plates and bits as I can afford them. I hit it hard 3 or 4 times a week for an hour or so and enjoy it immensely. I've lost about 20kg of fat and added about 10kg of muscle and still improving.

0
B4313b18cc03036a6147543d7b0872d6

(566)

on May 04, 2010
at 11:20 PM

I was pretty much a couch potato before I started paleo. I've added walking (both fast and slow) six out of seven days, fast quarter miles, moderate miles, and a 3.5 once a week. I do body weight exercises (squat, good mornings, push ups), band work (rows mostly), and weighted ball work 3-4 days a week.

It's made a huge difference in how I feel and, though my weight loss is stalled right now, the increased muscle mass has greatly improved body composition.

I've a way to go, but every bit counts.

0
782828e745d3ab159ad8f70abbc4094d

(130)

on May 04, 2010
at 10:17 PM

I play netball once a week, hike once a week, walk a lot (no car). Strength training involves kettlebells and bodyweight whenever I feel like it (FitDeck cards help me keep that varied, as does 365 Workouts iPhone app). I also have a dog at home and work in a dog-friendly office, so there's fun things like catch, chase, tug of war and walkies to break up the day.

0
0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on May 04, 2010
at 07:58 PM

Crossfit M, W, F.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu 2 x per week.

Nature trail walk 1x per month.

Starting Strength training M & F.

I do feel overtrained at times. Especially if I am eating low carb.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Yeesh, crossfit, Starting Strength, and martial arts all in one week?

0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on May 05, 2010
at 02:17 AM

¥es. Training is my cruel mistress.

0
326ddac1e74e7e2d4dc7d0f4d0aacad0

(80)

on May 04, 2010
at 06:51 PM

Most weeks my training consists of:

  • CF (5x/week @ 1-4 WOD/day)
  • CFE (intermittent - usually on days of travel and dependent on hotel equipment)
  • Competitive racquetball
  • Recovery (active rest like working in the yard, stretching, contrast showers, myofascial release).

Recovery is the real key in maintaining this regimen.

0
Ed33691404d94afdc45aea0af89b7185

on May 04, 2010
at 05:59 PM

I have recently started CrossFit and did compete in the BC Sectionals. I've been training 5 days a week but now that summer is arriving here in the mountains I'll be hiking, road biking, mountain biking, kayaking, and playing beach volleyball. Something tells me that if I am able to keep up the CrossFit along with theses other activities, I'll need some seriously yoga/stretching time.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 04, 2010
at 05:22 PM

Martial arts, 3 times a week.

I do as much NEPA (Non-Exercise Physical Activity) as possible, including standing up and walking around my little cubicle as code is compiling.

Additionally, I've been trying to get my own morning exercise routine, focusing on martial arts related skill-work, such as flexibility, balance, etc. I just have this issue with waking up early :(

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