1

votes

Sleep or Exercise?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 24, 2012 at 3:33 AM

I've done a search and don't see a question about this specific debate I have with myself sometimes

I usually wake up around 5:30 in the morning to go to the gym. I like this schedule and I go to bed around 9-9:30 in order to get a good sleep beforehand. However, some days (like today) I can't get in bed by 9:30. So, the question is, if I can't get to bed in time to get a full 8 hours sleep, should I just skip the gym the next morning? Which is more important in these times I have to stay up late, gym or sleep?

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on April 24, 2012
at 01:21 PM

I went with sleep last night, which was probably a good idea. I usually wake up before my 5:30 alarm when I'm planning on going to the gym, but this morning I slept right through to 7:30. Thanks for the input.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on April 24, 2012
at 06:22 AM

I would agree with sleep. Hopefully, your calories-in will automatically adjust down (i.e., less hungry due to less activity), but if that doesn't happen, I think it might be worth it to be thoughtful about eating less. Probably doesn't make a difference if this is not happening frequently, but if it's once or twice a week, I think the calories could add up.

Medium avatar

(10663)

on April 24, 2012
at 05:44 AM

@Sunny haha yeah about that... I have finals coming up. But I really am making an effort to get as much sleep as possible!

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on April 24, 2012
at 04:22 AM

Recovery is the hardest part of training. I am ALWAYS thinking of drilling and improving my specific skill set, it is too easy to forget about rest.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 24, 2012
at 04:08 AM

@April, I remember you having a similar question not too long ago. Hopefully you're getting better sleep and making it a priority as well:)

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 24, 2012
at 04:05 AM

@April, I remember you having a similar question not too long ago. Hopefully you're getting better sleep as well:)

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on April 24, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Great to see a trainer who understand's the importance of recovery in an athletic context. See people train at my box multiple times a day, no sleep and continue to wonder why they are spinning their wheels. +1

Medium avatar

(10663)

on April 24, 2012
at 03:53 AM

This pretty much says it all.

  • 4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

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3 Answers

best answer

14
A1a7413b99e03bc77f02d95c4170ea43

on April 24, 2012
at 03:40 AM

I'm going to go with sleep here. Training only works if you recover properly. Exercise is a stress on your body. Sleep is necessary. Without it, there's no recovery, AND you're adding another stressor to the equation. I'm a CF trainer, and I am always recommending this to my athletes. Get your sleep and nutrition dialed in first, and then exercise.

My two cents.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 24, 2012
at 04:05 AM

@April, I remember you having a similar question not too long ago. Hopefully you're getting better sleep as well:)

Medium avatar

(10663)

on April 24, 2012
at 03:53 AM

This pretty much says it all.

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on April 24, 2012
at 04:22 AM

Recovery is the hardest part of training. I am ALWAYS thinking of drilling and improving my specific skill set, it is too easy to forget about rest.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on April 24, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Great to see a trainer who understand's the importance of recovery in an athletic context. See people train at my box multiple times a day, no sleep and continue to wonder why they are spinning their wheels. +1

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on April 24, 2012
at 06:22 AM

I would agree with sleep. Hopefully, your calories-in will automatically adjust down (i.e., less hungry due to less activity), but if that doesn't happen, I think it might be worth it to be thoughtful about eating less. Probably doesn't make a difference if this is not happening frequently, but if it's once or twice a week, I think the calories could add up.

Medium avatar

(10663)

on April 24, 2012
at 05:44 AM

@Sunny haha yeah about that... I have finals coming up. But I really am making an effort to get as much sleep as possible!

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on April 24, 2012
at 04:08 AM

@April, I remember you having a similar question not too long ago. Hopefully you're getting better sleep and making it a priority as well:)

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on April 24, 2012
at 01:21 PM

I went with sleep last night, which was probably a good idea. I usually wake up before my 5:30 alarm when I'm planning on going to the gym, but this morning I slept right through to 7:30. Thanks for the input.

1
631b29d5ab1146e264e91d08103bb72c

on April 24, 2012
at 12:53 PM

There are two competing interest here; (1) the most inportant factor to overall health is sleep and (2) The most important part in overall fitness is consistency in routine.

So the OP's question is should I deviate from my routine in effort to get more sleep. The answer, as is always is with any thing health and fitness related, is, "it depends."

First, getting up at 5:30 is hard and if you start regularly skipping sessions it is just going to get harder. So maintaining that routine is critical. Part of maintaining that routine is getting to bed on time and if you can't get to bed on time regularly you need to question the whole routine. But assuming you are asking about the rare exeption of when you can't get to bed on time break it down into two catagories:

1) Minor deviation in sleep pattern. Example: It is a random wednesday night and you can't get to sleep until 11pm. Your nutrition has good and you feel great. In this case you are going to get up at 5:30. Sure sleep is important but maintaining that routine is going to trump that lost sleep.

2) Major but temporty deviation in sleep patter. Example: Something came up at work and you've been putting in late nights, eating paleo-ish fast food, and are generally stressed out. In the last 2 weeks you've had several days of getting to bed late. In this case, get some sleep.

In summary, go by how you feel and how often your sleep is getting disrupted. Try to maintain the routine unless maintaining the routine comes at the expense of your recovery. I know that's obvious but it is really no more complicated then that.

-1
F6a57a8bb60b5171366f06d9ddbc3880

on April 24, 2012
at 11:32 AM

I agree that the sleep is more important but if you're like me you'll wake up at the normal time anyway - so I'd go do the exercise anyway :-) I'd feel energised for the day too.

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