17

votes

Leptin, Insulin, Corstiol, Low Carb High Fat and Workouts

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 03, 2011 at 5:44 PM

I eat a high fat, low non-fibrous carb, moderate protein diet since reading the Rosedale Diet and Primal Body Primal Mind. I have been doing this for some time - years.

I also exercise daily, upon waking, fasted. Sometimes I do high intensity intervals, some days weights, but something every day for sure. I also walk a lot.

I keep seeing here that folks are recommending starch post workout to attenuate the cortisol response. I am at odds with this recommendation. It seems that for longevity purposes, spiking insulin (and leptin?) in order to lower cortisol is just fighting fire with fire (dousing the post workout cortisol with a insulin spike).

So, my question: Is intense exercise really optimal for longevity? If not, what kind of exercise is best so one can continue high fat low carb without the cortisol issues?

EDIT - I'm interested in discussing whether the act of exercising in such a way that "necessitates" carb refeeds is optimal.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 05, 2011
at 10:05 AM

Well I only do eight sprints... The time simulates walking back to the starting line and then resprinting... I could see cutting my break to 2 minutes... I keep my heart rate at a slower rate during the rest... Basically a brisk walk/sprint/walk / sprint... I would say try it both ways and see which one you are workng harder at...

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 04, 2011
at 02:18 PM

Thanks - it's similar to the sprints I do now, but I do them Tabata style with a lot less rest (20 seconds on 10 off). I think the longer rest between sets is critical.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 04, 2011
at 02:50 AM

Optimum for me is increasing my longevity rather than relentlessly tearing myself down. For some this may be readily apparent, but it's a bit fuzzy for me right now. I want to be as strong and fast as I can be now and as a kick-butt ol' granny. I am tinkering with Olympic lifts. I guess I was also wondering if once you start working out in a way that requires you to take in starches (or other sugars) post workout, are you then exercising at a pace that accelerated aging. Thanks.

A7ac68389a10bc99f33885e7ed0dbfe0

(165)

on June 03, 2011
at 11:56 PM

Freaking awesome... about time!!! Thank you Quilt!!!!!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 03, 2011
at 11:02 PM

The remainder of the quilt still is not editted......so this weekend.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 03, 2011
at 11:01 PM

First leptin post just got put up.......

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 03, 2011
at 10:44 PM

meredith, this whole thing rests entirely on your definition of "optimal". I lift heavy things with old timey compound exercise: squats, deadlifts, benches, presses, etc. Those are optimal for making me stronger. Building muscle, too, but mainly for gaining more strength: the ability to move even larger weight next time. Building strong muscles is great for keeping me young and not fragile and able to move around and function well. Thats optimal to me. My guess is that your definition is somewhat different. No?

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on June 03, 2011
at 09:08 PM

Awesome, well done, doc. Thanks for all you do

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:40 PM

yes.....www.jackkruse.com tonight I will be adding more content to the Quilt. To give people some idea of what fabricates the quilt of longevity. Then each blog will add another piece to each levee. The numbering of each levee is also in order of importance as of today. But they can and will go up and down as science dictates. Leptin is levee two.....that is how important it is.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:26 PM

Is the blog up yet, Quilt?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:06 PM

I do indeed! Can't wait for more content - it's really great. The work you are doing makes a huge positive imapct.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:02 PM

you need to read my blog. this is where I will be going. Its a phenomenal question that needs to be answered with biochemistry and not an opinion. Plus 100 if I could give it to you.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 03, 2011
at 06:38 PM

But I appreciate all comments as I am trying to rethink my workout habits.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 03, 2011
at 06:37 PM

Hmmm... That's not really what I was trying to get at. I am wondering if the "need" for carbs after certain types of workouts indicates that there is something not quite optimal about that type of exercise.

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4 Answers

4
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on June 03, 2011
at 08:42 PM

I think many people are very confused about cortisol. I'm probably among them, but here is what I've learned.

As far as I can tell, cortisol is released in response to stress, not in response to low blood sugar. Yes, one of the things it then does is stimulate gluconeogenesis, but that doesn't imply that cortisol is released whenever you are running out of glucose. In normal circumstances glucagon takes care of that.

So I don't really see the point in eating starch to try to somehow mitigate cortisol. If cortisol is released, it is released, and it's going to do what it does. How does eating starch on top of that help? If cortisol hasn't been released, then glucagon will take care of your blood sugar.

If you have cortisol issues, you need to avoid going for too long between meals, make sure your sleep is restful, and limit caffeine and alcohol.

As far as intense exercise goes, personally, I can do it just fine as long as my calorie and protein intake are adequate. But my hunch is that a small amount of starch before or after the workout won't actually hurt you, because it is going to get used so quickly.

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 04, 2011
at 06:51 AM

If you workout intense enough you can avoid the cortisol. warmup plus eight fourty second sprints with 2-3 minutes in between will finish in about 30 min. That is more than quick enough to avoid cortisol. This 3 times a week plus a leasurly run on another day is what I do.

The recomendation to eat carbs post workout is something that coaches teach their athletes so that they can recover faster. Two varities. Whey protien with a simple carb or a glass of chocolate milk... (Now this advice is the advice of coaches that may or may not be paleo) I mention this to give context. The brief insulin spike allowing the protien to be absorbed into the muscles.

However another effect of the simple carbs is that it kills HGH.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 04, 2011
at 02:18 PM

Thanks - it's similar to the sprints I do now, but I do them Tabata style with a lot less rest (20 seconds on 10 off). I think the longer rest between sets is critical.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 05, 2011
at 10:05 AM

Well I only do eight sprints... The time simulates walking back to the starting line and then resprinting... I could see cutting my break to 2 minutes... I keep my heart rate at a slower rate during the rest... Basically a brisk walk/sprint/walk / sprint... I would say try it both ways and see which one you are workng harder at...

1
Ab0369a70755bd07f44292b4ca8b2260

on June 03, 2011
at 06:41 PM

Glycogen is depleted in intense workouts and carbs are what "restock" the glycogen supply. In order to burn fat for energy, glycogen is needed. The best way to have this happen is to "re-feed" immediately after a workout. It doesn't have to be a lot, half a sweet potato, a piece of fruit etc.

I don't know about the effects of longevity, but if feeling good and looking good and performing well are important, I'd re-feed with some carbs immediately following a workout.

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on June 03, 2011
at 06:28 PM

I don't know the science behind it, but if I either fast or eat only protein and fat after a fasted workout, I feel that it takes longer to recover and my muscles are sore for longer. I also feel unsatisfied and have the munchies, which is unusual. If I have some carbs, not much, such as a banana and a glass of whole milk, after workouts, it feels fantastic.

This is more true after intense workouts (sprinting or weights) and less so for jogging, but still true all the same.

Other than that I eat a pretty low-carb diet, really nothing starchy at all, some carbs from dairy and red wine, and the occasional blueberries.

I have not really pushed it though. I could try to "train" myself to adapt to fasting or eating only protein after workouts. I really noticed a big difference when having even just a half a banana after workouts, so I'll probably stick with it. Some fruits and starchy vegetables (i.e. sweet potatoes) are great sources of certain nutrients, so my thinking is that this is not a bad way to get them.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 04, 2011
at 02:50 AM

Optimum for me is increasing my longevity rather than relentlessly tearing myself down. For some this may be readily apparent, but it's a bit fuzzy for me right now. I want to be as strong and fast as I can be now and as a kick-butt ol' granny. I am tinkering with Olympic lifts. I guess I was also wondering if once you start working out in a way that requires you to take in starches (or other sugars) post workout, are you then exercising at a pace that accelerated aging. Thanks.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 03, 2011
at 06:38 PM

But I appreciate all comments as I am trying to rethink my workout habits.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 03, 2011
at 06:37 PM

Hmmm... That's not really what I was trying to get at. I am wondering if the "need" for carbs after certain types of workouts indicates that there is something not quite optimal about that type of exercise.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 03, 2011
at 10:44 PM

meredith, this whole thing rests entirely on your definition of "optimal". I lift heavy things with old timey compound exercise: squats, deadlifts, benches, presses, etc. Those are optimal for making me stronger. Building muscle, too, but mainly for gaining more strength: the ability to move even larger weight next time. Building strong muscles is great for keeping me young and not fragile and able to move around and function well. Thats optimal to me. My guess is that your definition is somewhat different. No?

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