0

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Is sprinting really "primal" at all?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 06, 2011 at 8:11 PM

I would be interested in examples of sprinting in hunter-gatherer life, as I can't seem to think of many. I may be out of touch with the putative reality of so-called Grok's daily life, but the only example of sprinting I can think of would be running away from predators (whether they were other animals or hostile people). However, I think the frequency of those instances would have been pretty darn low (though the outcome vitally important)? What about some other examples of actual sprinting?

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 07:19 PM

I think if sprinting was a big part of our evolution we would be much better at it. Any reasonably fit human can sprint and would want to be able to sprint on occasion. I just think that occasion would be much less then is used in a "primal" exercise routine. Wild places where never dense with predators I would worry about a crow shitting all over a kill more than it being taken by another predator. An injured animal usually doesn't go far. Then it beds down and waits. sprinting after it would not help you in this case. stalking up quietly would.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 07:06 PM

I have hunted for over 10 years in temperate rain forests, oak savanna, pine forests, and high desert. I use both a modern rifle and primitive bows and arrows made by myself. I have hunted everything from black bears to squirrels with primitive weapons. I have never sprinted in pursuit of game. I have sprinted away from a bees nest, and out of the way of a charging feral pig (more of a dodge). I think people underestimate the effectiveness of primitive weapons and the abilities of the people that have used them there entire lives.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 05:05 PM

survivalmachine - can you imagine hitting a rabbit with a big rock? what if you crippled it but it could still somewhat run. you'd be fast enough to catch it then, right? but you'd still sprint because dinner was on the line. if you use your imagination a little bit I'm sure you could think of hundreds of scenarios where being fast would mean the difference between eating and starving, and between living and dying

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 05:01 PM

and yes, paleo man wasn't being chased by mountain lions every day. but the average hunter gatherer would have had several encounters over the course of his life with large predators. depending on how circumstances it may have been an almost daily thing. how many modern men can say the same? less them 1% of 1% of us. life was completely different.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 05:00 PM

guns and modern bows are incredibly lethal. the reason we don't chase after wounded game today is they will run from us and possibly die while hiding and we may not be able to recover the body (loss of meat and inhumane). paleo man would have made much less lethal blows and therefore had to track and chase game in order to finish them off and recover the body before other animals did. ask any hunter.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:46 AM

I don't buy the running from predators line either. Are you saying people that have spent there whole lives around those predators aren't going to understand how to deal with them? sure thing could go wrong and then sprinting would would be an option. But from what I have read most hunter gathers talk to predators when they run into them telling them they are not a threat and to leave them alone etc. Not turn and run like pray something thing they would understand much deeper then us with our"modern knowledge" and all.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 07, 2011
at 01:42 AM

I understand your point, and I agree that it was very important, just not overwhelmingly common. However, I still don't buy the argument that humans can catch up with any wounded wild animal that they couldn't catch up with if it was healthy. What small mammals could we catch? Rabbits? Squirrels? Those critters are FAST. I don't know, maybe a muskrat that was caught far away from water?

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:34 AM

Absolutely agree. Take your dog to a dog run and play with him. All the sprinting you need.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Another point is sprinting shoeless. I always hike, hunt, and work/garden on my land with out shoes. I have done this for 13 years (with breaks for work in the city where I have to wear heavy work boots) still sprinting for any length of time would be out of the question in all but the cushiest ecosystems. Even with leather huaraches. Jogging no problem

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:07 AM

continued: I guess my point is yes sprinting is a useful mode of transportation. But was it commonly used by hunter gathers I don't think so. It's ineffective,inefficient, and dangerous when it comes to hunting. I don't really see anything else it would be used for on a regular basis. Is it bad for you? probably not. Is it essential for good health? I doubt it.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:51 AM

continue: I have caught rabbits when out backpacking by simply tricking them. Just walk in a wide circle around them slowly spiraling in slowly then throw a stick/rock or jump on them and break it's neck. They don't know you are getting closer because you are always walking away. Thats just something that's fun to do if you spend a lot of time in the woods.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:46 AM

continued: Ok so for the rabbits other small animals. So maybe we can catch rabbits that are running from a fire in an open field. But rabbits tend to stay very close to thick brush/hole in the ground in nature. You could burn them out and jump on a few but there goes your rabbit spot for a year or two. You could just use a rabbit stick(a short heavy stick) show up at dawn or dusk and get what you want with much less work. Better yet why not set traps on there trails go to sleep and come back latter?

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:37 AM

continued: I will say yes you could kill a deer with nothing but your hands and maybe a sharp rock. But I still think it would be more of an ambush situation. More Importantly why would you have to? Sounds like a lot of energy that doesn't need to be expended. When all you would have to do is know the animals paterns, hide, wait/call in, and kill. The only ecosystems this doesn't work in are deserts because it's so hard to hide and animals have less consistent trails. Even in deserts people would tend to build a rock blinds if the animal density was high enough.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:25 AM

Ok so when I said traditional I meant hunter gathers with stone age technologies. I don't know if a deer can jump off a 15 rock but it would suprise me and that is a pretty specific situation there maybe other ways down that a deer could take. If a deer was trying to get away from a person and got backed into a corner I think it would still have a very good chance at escape. they are extremely agile and fast. They will launch off of trees/rocks to get more height just like a parkour runner.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:40 PM

Continued: By the way, we could just drop the whole deer thing and just say that there definitely are animals that you could use sprinting and agility to catch. In fact, here's an example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R_0FryVRNk They hunt rabbits with their bare hands. There's proof that we can hunt SOMETHING with our speed and agility. Perhaps we wouldn't be a match for deer, but looks like we're good at catching rabbits.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:37 PM

Continued: Maybe you wouldn't need the sprinting if you use the rocks? Well what about wounding it and then running it down? I guess you could track it instead? One thing I have trouble with though is then why are we so good at moving quickly through these kinds of environments? I really don't see it as crazy to suggest that you could train and get to the point where you could sprint down a deer in the right environment. Maybe not dense forest and big hills, but perhaps places with big rocks, streams, etc?

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Continued: Believe it or not, there is a gigantic variety in parkour and it certainly doesn't come instinctively. You have to use your head to know what to do in what situation, especially if you're trying to lead an animal on the routes it's worst at and the ones you're best at. I'm still just here guessing on something I don't know anything about, but I see no reason why you couldn't pick the right spot and hunt a deer with nothing but rocks and your agility. I'm just pulling this shit out of my ass though, so whatever. Prove me wrong. Why couldn't you kill a deer with rocks + sprinting?

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:32 PM

Continued: The point is, people WAY underestimate our speed through a varied environment with things like big rocks, trees, streams, etc. Why couldn't we use that speed to run after a deer we just wounded with a big rock or something? Might seem primitive, but I assume we're still adapted to hunting without something as technologically advanced as a bow and arrow. Plus how's it not using our brain? You would have to pick the right environment, lead it on paths we're especially good at (big drops if they can't handle that or something), and know all the parkour shit.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:28 PM

@total fing hippie: I didn't really mean catch the deer with your bare hands and use BJJ to submit him or something. My point is that we're a lot faster than most people realize. You studied the traditional methods of people who lived in a dense forest, but how do you know they're good at moving or anything like a real paleo hunter-gatherer tribe? BTW I didn't mean dense forest anyway. I meant dense forested areas plus lots of big streams, rocks, etc, which would help even the playing field. Can a deer jump off a 15 foot rock? Just wondering.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 06, 2011
at 10:17 PM

As a hunter that hunts in dense forrest and have studied the traditional methods used by the people that lived here. I will say I don't care how fast and good someone is at parkour. You will never catch a deer or elk by running in dense forest. They will vanish in seconds and tracking in dense forest isn't possible at sprinting speeds. Why not use your brains instead? For instance common in dense forests is a type arrow that falls apart in the animal leaving a large hole bleeding. Then you just follow the blood trail. No need to sprint/fight with the animal.

87e9b93ebba7282403395c9e2ad887a5

(150)

on May 06, 2011
at 10:14 PM

I saw a clip on Youtube a modern day hunter-gather tribe doing this. The runner of the group tracked down and killed the animal after 8 hours of running after it. The animal was lying there exhausted when the hunter got to it. And I still think sprinting could be a handy escape from other predators.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on May 06, 2011
at 09:38 PM

http://www.amazon.com/Hadza-Hunter-Gatherers-Tanzania-Origins-Behavior/dp/0520253426/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1304717910&sr=8-1

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:20 PM

I hadn't thought of play. That's a good point, though I suppose it doesn't cover later life when most of the muscles necessary for adult sprinting are developed. Would that matter? I don't know.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:17 PM

I am skeptical on those people minding some rain (unless they were afraid of lightning), but hey, I could be wrong.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:15 PM

I could see how it would come handy in your case...

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:15 PM

This is intriguing. I am very skeptical on a sprinting human being able to sprint to catch up to a wounded animal. I would be interested if you have references to the Hadza claim, as that might be worth learning more about?

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9 Answers

5
Medium avatar

on May 06, 2011
at 08:48 PM

Most of it would have occurred during the hunting process. I think many of us overlook just how difficult it is to consistently take down megafauna with (relatively) crude lithic technology. Simply hitting the animal with a single spear isn't always going to cut it. There are plenty of glancing blows and so forth that cause the animal to bolt. Best bet might be to hit it again. The Hadza use bows and arrows and 3 types of poison but still end up having to chase down animals or run back to camp to get help for tracking a wounded animal. Keep in mind that we've always had predatory competitors who will take our dinner if we don't properly secure it ASAP.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:15 PM

This is intriguing. I am very skeptical on a sprinting human being able to sprint to catch up to a wounded animal. I would be interested if you have references to the Hadza claim, as that might be worth learning more about?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on May 06, 2011
at 09:38 PM

http://www.amazon.com/Hadza-Hunter-Gatherers-Tanzania-Origins-Behavior/dp/0520253426/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1304717910&sr=8-1

2
D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:25 AM

Of course it is/was.

running after slower prey (small mammals, ground birds, injured or young prey). running after wounded fast prey (ungulates). running towards an animal that is struggling to break free of a trap you've laid. running away from angry mastodons and tigers.

I have startled bears in the woods and my modern knowledge told me to stand my ground. but i bet many a paleolithic man or woman turned tail and ran. and you better believe that you can haul ass with 600 pounds of angry bear chasing you.

did you ever see the opening scene in Last of the Mohicans? Hawkeye is chasing after a moose (i haven't seen it in ages, it may have been an elk or large deer) that he has shot. just imagine he'd shot it with a bow and arrow or stabbed it with a spear or hit it with a rock or...

an animal or enemy grabs your baby. you are going to speed walk in pursuit? running after a fleeing enemy. running away from a stronger enemy.

It's called fight or FLIGHT for a reason. It wasn't done every day or even every week. but when you needed to do it you were able to do it.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:46 AM

I don't buy the running from predators line either. Are you saying people that have spent there whole lives around those predators aren't going to understand how to deal with them? sure thing could go wrong and then sprinting would would be an option. But from what I have read most hunter gathers talk to predators when they run into them telling them they are not a threat and to leave them alone etc. Not turn and run like pray something thing they would understand much deeper then us with our"modern knowledge" and all.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 07:06 PM

I have hunted for over 10 years in temperate rain forests, oak savanna, pine forests, and high desert. I use both a modern rifle and primitive bows and arrows made by myself. I have hunted everything from black bears to squirrels with primitive weapons. I have never sprinted in pursuit of game. I have sprinted away from a bees nest, and out of the way of a charging feral pig (more of a dodge). I think people underestimate the effectiveness of primitive weapons and the abilities of the people that have used them there entire lives.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 07, 2011
at 01:42 AM

I understand your point, and I agree that it was very important, just not overwhelmingly common. However, I still don't buy the argument that humans can catch up with any wounded wild animal that they couldn't catch up with if it was healthy. What small mammals could we catch? Rabbits? Squirrels? Those critters are FAST. I don't know, maybe a muskrat that was caught far away from water?

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 05:05 PM

survivalmachine - can you imagine hitting a rabbit with a big rock? what if you crippled it but it could still somewhat run. you'd be fast enough to catch it then, right? but you'd still sprint because dinner was on the line. if you use your imagination a little bit I'm sure you could think of hundreds of scenarios where being fast would mean the difference between eating and starving, and between living and dying

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 07:19 PM

I think if sprinting was a big part of our evolution we would be much better at it. Any reasonably fit human can sprint and would want to be able to sprint on occasion. I just think that occasion would be much less then is used in a "primal" exercise routine. Wild places where never dense with predators I would worry about a crow shitting all over a kill more than it being taken by another predator. An injured animal usually doesn't go far. Then it beds down and waits. sprinting after it would not help you in this case. stalking up quietly would.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 05:00 PM

guns and modern bows are incredibly lethal. the reason we don't chase after wounded game today is they will run from us and possibly die while hiding and we may not be able to recover the body (loss of meat and inhumane). paleo man would have made much less lethal blows and therefore had to track and chase game in order to finish them off and recover the body before other animals did. ask any hunter.

D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on May 07, 2011
at 05:01 PM

and yes, paleo man wasn't being chased by mountain lions every day. but the average hunter gatherer would have had several encounters over the course of his life with large predators. depending on how circumstances it may have been an almost daily thing. how many modern men can say the same? less them 1% of 1% of us. life was completely different.

2
Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on May 06, 2011
at 08:40 PM

What about chasing after something, like a rabbit or other small animal?

Also I doubt that humans magically got along better ... so I would think we did a fair amount of running after and away from each other.

Also - games and play. Kids sprint around naturally, that's probably not new.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:34 AM

Absolutely agree. Take your dog to a dog run and play with him. All the sprinting you need.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:20 PM

I hadn't thought of play. That's a good point, though I suppose it doesn't cover later life when most of the muscles necessary for adult sprinting are developed. Would that matter? I don't know.

1
34d0dfe6cb1a477bd2b5f984c2af29a9

on May 06, 2011
at 09:15 PM

I'm pretty sure that paleolithic humans captured animals not by sprinting but by running for hours until they (the prey) collapsed.

Saw this on Discovery channel so be gentle with your barbs, could well be nonsense.

87e9b93ebba7282403395c9e2ad887a5

(150)

on May 06, 2011
at 10:14 PM

I saw a clip on Youtube a modern day hunter-gather tribe doing this. The runner of the group tracked down and killed the animal after 8 hours of running after it. The animal was lying there exhausted when the hunter got to it. And I still think sprinting could be a handy escape from other predators.

1
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on May 06, 2011
at 09:01 PM

How about during play? You need to learn how to sprint for when it really matters, i.e. survival. Not everything falls into the category of pursuing food, although that might be the most important.

I've had to sprint from my older brother plenty of times.. likely saved me a few broken bones.

Big picture.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:15 PM

I could see how it would come handy in your case...

0
61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

on May 06, 2011
at 10:00 PM

I think hunter gathers used brains more then bronze in most everything they did/do. When I read things like sprinting or lifting really heavy stuff is part of a primal life style I am kind of skeptical. Not that I think those things are bad. Sure they live very physical lives. But they are not idiots. If you learn about primitive skills you will be amazed at the technologies hunter gathers had and the proficiency they had at using them. Lifting something really heavy is dangerous. Why not use people and technology? I am with you. I can't think of a reason people would do much sprinting. Sure maybe a little like if they stepped on a bees nest, or came across an unfriendly tribe. But those I believe would be rare events. Maybe rarely in a hunting situation but most of the time they would out smart pray not out run it. Persistence hunting (long distance running) I can see in desert ecosystems but not in any other.

0
6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 09:57 PM

I sprint all the time just to get places in the wilderness. If there's a big gap with a 2-3 foot deep stream running through it, the fastest way to the other side is to gun it and leap across. This is a fairly common example too. Sprinting is often useful for getting the power necessary to leap across something wide.

Also, I think people tend to WAY underestimate our speed and agility. If you're a trained athlete (parkour etc), of course you couldn't sprint down a deer in an open field, but it's a much different story when you're dealing with dense forest, wide streams, big rocks, etc. Sprinting through a setting like that equipped with all the parkour techniques and stuff... I see no reason why you couldn't catch a deer, especially if you already wounded it by hitting it with a big rock or spear. I'm just guessing though. I've never tried it.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:37 PM

Continued: Maybe you wouldn't need the sprinting if you use the rocks? Well what about wounding it and then running it down? I guess you could track it instead? One thing I have trouble with though is then why are we so good at moving quickly through these kinds of environments? I really don't see it as crazy to suggest that you could train and get to the point where you could sprint down a deer in the right environment. Maybe not dense forest and big hills, but perhaps places with big rocks, streams, etc?

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:40 PM

Continued: By the way, we could just drop the whole deer thing and just say that there definitely are animals that you could use sprinting and agility to catch. In fact, here's an example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R_0FryVRNk They hunt rabbits with their bare hands. There's proof that we can hunt SOMETHING with our speed and agility. Perhaps we wouldn't be a match for deer, but looks like we're good at catching rabbits.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Continued: Believe it or not, there is a gigantic variety in parkour and it certainly doesn't come instinctively. You have to use your head to know what to do in what situation, especially if you're trying to lead an animal on the routes it's worst at and the ones you're best at. I'm still just here guessing on something I don't know anything about, but I see no reason why you couldn't pick the right spot and hunt a deer with nothing but rocks and your agility. I'm just pulling this shit out of my ass though, so whatever. Prove me wrong. Why couldn't you kill a deer with rocks + sprinting?

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:28 PM

@total fing hippie: I didn't really mean catch the deer with your bare hands and use BJJ to submit him or something. My point is that we're a lot faster than most people realize. You studied the traditional methods of people who lived in a dense forest, but how do you know they're good at moving or anything like a real paleo hunter-gatherer tribe? BTW I didn't mean dense forest anyway. I meant dense forested areas plus lots of big streams, rocks, etc, which would help even the playing field. Can a deer jump off a 15 foot rock? Just wondering.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:51 AM

continue: I have caught rabbits when out backpacking by simply tricking them. Just walk in a wide circle around them slowly spiraling in slowly then throw a stick/rock or jump on them and break it's neck. They don't know you are getting closer because you are always walking away. Thats just something that's fun to do if you spend a lot of time in the woods.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:07 AM

continued: I guess my point is yes sprinting is a useful mode of transportation. But was it commonly used by hunter gathers I don't think so. It's ineffective,inefficient, and dangerous when it comes to hunting. I don't really see anything else it would be used for on a regular basis. Is it bad for you? probably not. Is it essential for good health? I doubt it.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 06, 2011
at 11:32 PM

Continued: The point is, people WAY underestimate our speed through a varied environment with things like big rocks, trees, streams, etc. Why couldn't we use that speed to run after a deer we just wounded with a big rock or something? Might seem primitive, but I assume we're still adapted to hunting without something as technologically advanced as a bow and arrow. Plus how's it not using our brain? You would have to pick the right environment, lead it on paths we're especially good at (big drops if they can't handle that or something), and know all the parkour shit.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:25 AM

Ok so when I said traditional I meant hunter gathers with stone age technologies. I don't know if a deer can jump off a 15 rock but it would suprise me and that is a pretty specific situation there maybe other ways down that a deer could take. If a deer was trying to get away from a person and got backed into a corner I think it would still have a very good chance at escape. they are extremely agile and fast. They will launch off of trees/rocks to get more height just like a parkour runner.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Another point is sprinting shoeless. I always hike, hunt, and work/garden on my land with out shoes. I have done this for 13 years (with breaks for work in the city where I have to wear heavy work boots) still sprinting for any length of time would be out of the question in all but the cushiest ecosystems. Even with leather huaraches. Jogging no problem

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:37 AM

continued: I will say yes you could kill a deer with nothing but your hands and maybe a sharp rock. But I still think it would be more of an ambush situation. More Importantly why would you have to? Sounds like a lot of energy that doesn't need to be expended. When all you would have to do is know the animals paterns, hide, wait/call in, and kill. The only ecosystems this doesn't work in are deserts because it's so hard to hide and animals have less consistent trails. Even in deserts people would tend to build a rock blinds if the animal density was high enough.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 06, 2011
at 10:17 PM

As a hunter that hunts in dense forrest and have studied the traditional methods used by the people that lived here. I will say I don't care how fast and good someone is at parkour. You will never catch a deer or elk by running in dense forest. They will vanish in seconds and tracking in dense forest isn't possible at sprinting speeds. Why not use your brains instead? For instance common in dense forests is a type arrow that falls apart in the animal leaving a large hole bleeding. Then you just follow the blood trail. No need to sprint/fight with the animal.

61e254571b4c792bca87340a090a3ea1

(480)

on May 07, 2011
at 12:46 AM

continued: Ok so for the rabbits other small animals. So maybe we can catch rabbits that are running from a fire in an open field. But rabbits tend to stay very close to thick brush/hole in the ground in nature. You could burn them out and jump on a few but there goes your rabbit spot for a year or two. You could just use a rabbit stick(a short heavy stick) show up at dawn or dusk and get what you want with much less work. Better yet why not set traps on there trails go to sleep and come back latter?

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 06, 2011
at 09:31 PM

How about when Grok needed to take a flying sh*t? There, you probably won't see that on Discovery Channel, but it happened.

0
F3176aa8463fe7f416f4da0d04974c1d

(1392)

on May 06, 2011
at 08:34 PM

Sprinting for shelter when it starts pouring rain, perhaps? I can't think of many others either.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on May 06, 2011
at 09:17 PM

I am skeptical on those people minding some rain (unless they were afraid of lightning), but hey, I could be wrong.

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