2

votes

Is Fructose that bad news article

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 05, 2011 at 3:02 PM

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/05/04/how-sugar-affects-the-body-in-motion/

This Article suggests that Fructose in natural form can be beneficial. What do you think?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Hmm, I always assumed that that the brain's energy needs took precedent over everything and somehow had something of a sequestered glucose supply from the liver. I didn't think it had to compete with the rest of the body for glucose drawn out of systemic circulation. Thanks for the info.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:09 PM

Well, clearly muscles can't run over to your liver and steal glycogen, but since they're using glucose released by the liver it seems appropriate enough. The key point is that you do need to replenish liver glycogen during exercise, which is why the various replenishment formulas on the market tend to include fructose.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:08 PM

Well, clearly muscles can't run over to your liver and steal glycogen, but since they're using glucose released by the liver it seems appropriate enough. The key point is that you do need to replenish liver glycogen during exercise, and that's why the various replenishment formulas on the market tend to include fructose.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:01 PM

Seems like semantics, but the liver isn't becoming depleted by the muscles, it's just not being refueled to the same extent as it would be from the dietary pool of glucose due to the demands of the muscles.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 08:32 PM

Muscles uptake blood glucose during exercise, and since they don't release glycogen into the blood, the liver has to make up the difference for you to stay conscious. (http://physiologyonline.physiology.org/content/20/4/260.full)

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 08:26 PM

Muscles can use blood glucose, though in a limited fashion.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Muscles can use blood glucose. If your muscle glycogen is depleted thanks to some sort of exercise, your liver glycogen will be required to maintain blood sugar levels, as muscle and brain and everything else will be consuming it.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 19, 2011
at 05:03 PM

I too thought this article is just restating what I thought was common knowledge. Why release the article now? Fructose for fat couch people is no bueno. For endurance hell yes I'd think it'd be great.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on May 05, 2011
at 05:11 PM

Gotta choke it down if you want to complete your 50 miles at a good average speed! Ugh. I would have been better off in a hamster wheel.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on May 05, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Man. I sure don't miss the GOO. That stuff is ~nasty~!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on May 05, 2011
at 04:24 PM

Any excess goes to de novo lipogenesis and formation of palmitic acid and this is what causes leptin resistance at the receptor level. Palmitic acid from fat sources does not seem to cause it

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on May 05, 2011
at 04:05 PM

Jimmy is correct. The fructose creates a massive abundance of citrate which is shunted to de novo lipogenesis to reduce citrate levels to a normal, glycolytic concentration. This one way to cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders, raise serum TG, lower HDL, and raise LDL pattern B. If you eat fructose, eat it in something it comes packaged in by nature, not by a supplement company.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on May 05, 2011
at 03:49 PM

It's true for the liver. Your liver will convert fructose into glycogen, which can then be released into the body as glucose. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructose#Fructose_metabolism

796d2266c54ffe57bf43a00b4315b747

(44)

on May 05, 2011
at 03:35 PM

"All sugars, including sucrose, or table sugar, and high-fructose corn syrup, which usually consists of almost equal portions of glucose and fructose, are converted into glucose, and stored as glycogen, in the body." this statement is incorrect.

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3 Answers

2
62f89aa727cf3ce77c36651347cabc14

(884)

on June 30, 2011
at 09:51 PM

The article comments on carbohydrates in conjunction with exercise. There are plenty of people on these boards who do eat starches, and even more who eat them only around their workouts, to replenish glycogen stores.

"Not that any of us should live on sweets. ???Sugar is not all bad,??? Dr. Johnson concluded, ???but it???s hardly nutritionally good, either.??? The best sweet option, he added, is fruit, which comes prepackaged with a small but satiating dose of all-natural fructose."

Key to that statement is "small", not "all-natural".

2
4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on May 05, 2011
at 04:01 PM

This article is merely repeating the pretty well known fact that fructose is metabolized by the liver to replenish liver glycogen stores. When I was doing long bike rides (50+ miles), I'd down these little packets of goo which were basically fructose and maltodextrin (starch). The point of the fructose was to rapidly replenish liver glycogen, while the point of the starch was to keep your blood sugar up/replenish muscle glycogen.

It's not saying that, in general, fructose is not that bad. It's simply stating that if you're an active endurance athlete, fructose is useful in forcing quicker liver glycogen replenishment. Notice how the article makes a point to say that the only people this sort of behavior is useful for are those engaged in endurance exercise lasting more than two hours - the long expenditure of effort requires extra effort to stay conscious, let alone do well in a race. If you're not engaged in that sort of activity and gorge on fructose, fructose still is that bad.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on May 05, 2011
at 05:11 PM

Gotta choke it down if you want to complete your 50 miles at a good average speed! Ugh. I would have been better off in a hamster wheel.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on May 05, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Man. I sure don't miss the GOO. That stuff is ~nasty~!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 19, 2011
at 05:03 PM

I too thought this article is just restating what I thought was common knowledge. Why release the article now? Fructose for fat couch people is no bueno. For endurance hell yes I'd think it'd be great.

1
Medium avatar

on June 02, 2011
at 07:50 PM

Strenuous exercise diminishes or exhausts this liver glycogen, and until those stores are replenished, the body isn???t fully ready for another exercise bout.

How does strenuous exercise deplete liver glycogen? I don't believe that it's available to muscles. I suppose RBCs could be using more of it, but do our brains really consume much more than their standard 5g/hour of glucose when we are exercising?

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:09 PM

Well, clearly muscles can't run over to your liver and steal glycogen, but since they're using glucose released by the liver it seems appropriate enough. The key point is that you do need to replenish liver glycogen during exercise, which is why the various replenishment formulas on the market tend to include fructose.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 08:32 PM

Muscles uptake blood glucose during exercise, and since they don't release glycogen into the blood, the liver has to make up the difference for you to stay conscious. (http://physiologyonline.physiology.org/content/20/4/260.full)

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Muscles can use blood glucose. If your muscle glycogen is depleted thanks to some sort of exercise, your liver glycogen will be required to maintain blood sugar levels, as muscle and brain and everything else will be consuming it.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Hmm, I always assumed that that the brain's energy needs took precedent over everything and somehow had something of a sequestered glucose supply from the liver. I didn't think it had to compete with the rest of the body for glucose drawn out of systemic circulation. Thanks for the info.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:01 PM

Seems like semantics, but the liver isn't becoming depleted by the muscles, it's just not being refueled to the same extent as it would be from the dietary pool of glucose due to the demands of the muscles.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 09:08 PM

Well, clearly muscles can't run over to your liver and steal glycogen, but since they're using glucose released by the liver it seems appropriate enough. The key point is that you do need to replenish liver glycogen during exercise, and that's why the various replenishment formulas on the market tend to include fructose.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on June 02, 2011
at 08:26 PM

Muscles can use blood glucose, though in a limited fashion.

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