4

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Intense (or highly intense) exercise, transient(?) leaky gut and post exercise food choice

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 19, 2013 at 11:08 AM

Highly intense exercise has been shown to increase intestinal permeability. Eg http://suppversity.blogspot.com.au/2012/11/shedding-some-light-on-the-leaky-gut.html

The question is two pronged: Are you aware and can you shed some light on the acuteness of permeability that's brought on by intense, longish duration exercise (is it only transient...?) and;

Do you think/can you justifiably say that food intake after a workout is all the more important if the tight junctions are compromised? Theoretically, could tomato lectins for example, (which people with compromised guts can have problems with in principle and practice), be a poor choice as a post-workou food? Or even the known nasties of casein and gluten (which I personally abstain from, but regardless...

I play football/soccer and have had some digestive issues, and am thinking about performance/health tradeoffs, balances etc...

Over to you ;)

edit- [I didn't realise bounty would expire, would start new one but apparently that can't be done...]

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 27, 2013
at 03:11 AM

@RK, cool, question is asked in spirit of engagement, I ofc have no problem re no answers ;) Glad you're shedding light etc

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 26, 2013
at 03:50 AM

The confounding point for me seems to be that the type of activity I'm doing (90 minute highly glycotic soccer) is such that stimulating recovery/stopping inflammation asap afterward is a priority. One way to this is by eating, particularly carbs. But eating certain carbs, foods etc may exacerbate digestive issues. A bit of a catch 22. (nb asap for means mean when I have an appetite- it tends to get blunted hugely post intense/highly intense activity...) Perhaps this sort of thing is why ppl like Jack Kruse advise ppl with digestive issues to stop exercise until getting as sorted as possible

32652cb696b75182cb121009ee4edea3

(5802)

on March 22, 2013
at 08:15 PM

I don't have answers, but thank you for sharing. This sheds some light on some issues I've been having as well.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 20, 2013
at 02:51 PM

Well, a lot of people say not to have carbs hour post HIIT because it'll stunt hgh release, also I've heard pure bcaas are good in that window. So I'd say either don't eat or have a good protein shake during that window, who cares if you have a permeable gut if you're just taking in bcaas, those things are like already broken down (I think).

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 20, 2013
at 03:02 AM

Yeah I agree, very often there is some great stuff on there :)

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 20, 2013
at 03:00 AM

Thanks for your response. I interpreted the article as highlighting that hiit is potentially bad for the tight junctions but not nearly as much as is relatively long duration exercise (e.g., a 90 minute soccer game, marathon)... In that post he noted that the problem can occur even for hitters, but through a mechanism occurring after the workout. In this context I want to know if certain foods after a workout (like those he mentions) are particularly bad in that transient phase of 'leakiness' and what could be done in the acute period to encourage 'optimal' recovery.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on March 19, 2013
at 11:53 AM

+1 for sharing Adel's superb blog. :)

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3 Answers

1
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on March 27, 2013
at 02:52 PM

I'm not really sure if I have any experience with 'leaky gut'. It's possible, since I find that my skin is highly reactive to my diet.

Anyway, this is just a thought, so forgive me if it's a horrible idea or if it's been discussed ad nauseam. It seems like leaky gut is the exact situation that the Master Cleanse would be most effective with. It's a thorough, agitating cleanse that provides a very effective reset.

I'm not saying anyone should make a habit of it, and I'm not saying it's necessarily healthy or nutritious. But, it seems like a natural scouring of what ails ya. Almost like a cayenne, citrus, mineral salt 'chemotherapy'.

I've done it twice and found it mildly enlightening and profoundly empowering both times. Having said that, I don't think I'll ever do it again unless I'm severely ill and suspect it'll help. It is a very depleting process.

http://calorielab.com/news/2008/07/17/master-cleanse-in-detail/

1
C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

on March 27, 2013
at 01:50 PM

Food intake matters a lot in the following ways:

  1. During the period of having tight junctions open you might want to avoid foods that have the ability to cross the intestinal barrier and trigger inflammation/autoimmune reaction like gluten, casein, in severe cases disaccharides (fructose). Due to the delay of food reaching small intestine you might actually avoid these some 2-4 hours before the tight junction opening trigger

  2. Further to that, in order not cumulate the load you should avoid foods that impair gut barrier like coffee and alcohol and environmental factors like heat stress (sauna)

  3. There are foods that improve intestinal permeability like glutamine, probiotics, colostrum, bananas, saturated fat

  4. Note of other dietary and lifestyle factors that improve the integrity of intestinal barrier like stress reduction/meditation, hydration, fasting, vitamin D(sun tanning)

Converting this info to a diet regimen could look as follows:

  • Before training fast OR have saturated fat with banana (my favorite dessert is banana mixed with mascarpone), drink plenty of water

  • during training drink plenty of water, adjust clothing to prevent heat shock

  • after training same banana with saturated fat, colostrum, glutamine, drink plenty of water

Re transiency: Study mentioned here concludes that alcohol opens tight junctions for 4-14 days however I am not sure if the same duration applies to other triggers as the mechanism may differ.

1
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 19, 2013
at 12:18 PM

N=1, my digestion improves with a HIIT protocol. Also "It stands to reason that the combination of high intensity and long durations, as you will find it in an ultra-marathon runner, for example, is particularly detrimental to the integrity of the intestinal wall..." high intensity long duration is probably bad for more things than just your gut permeability. I'm a proponent of high intensity very short duration activities and I think this article does a good job at saying that when you exercise for longer durations you face more health issues, that's just my interpretation though.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 20, 2013
at 02:51 PM

Well, a lot of people say not to have carbs hour post HIIT because it'll stunt hgh release, also I've heard pure bcaas are good in that window. So I'd say either don't eat or have a good protein shake during that window, who cares if you have a permeable gut if you're just taking in bcaas, those things are like already broken down (I think).

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 20, 2013
at 03:00 AM

Thanks for your response. I interpreted the article as highlighting that hiit is potentially bad for the tight junctions but not nearly as much as is relatively long duration exercise (e.g., a 90 minute soccer game, marathon)... In that post he noted that the problem can occur even for hitters, but through a mechanism occurring after the workout. In this context I want to know if certain foods after a workout (like those he mentions) are particularly bad in that transient phase of 'leakiness' and what could be done in the acute period to encourage 'optimal' recovery.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on March 26, 2013
at 03:50 AM

The confounding point for me seems to be that the type of activity I'm doing (90 minute highly glycotic soccer) is such that stimulating recovery/stopping inflammation asap afterward is a priority. One way to this is by eating, particularly carbs. But eating certain carbs, foods etc may exacerbate digestive issues. A bit of a catch 22. (nb asap for means mean when I have an appetite- it tends to get blunted hugely post intense/highly intense activity...) Perhaps this sort of thing is why ppl like Jack Kruse advise ppl with digestive issues to stop exercise until getting as sorted as possible

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