3

votes

How to train to climb a mountain

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 29, 2010 at 10:23 AM

I went out yesterday for a walk in the countryside. There was a small mountain there (about 2000ft high) which I started to climb. About a quarter of the way up my legs muscles started to fail so much I had to make my way back down.

I was really surprised, I do squats as part of my exercise routine and was fairly sure that I had pretty strong leg muscles.

I really want to climb this mountain. What specific training can I do to ensure that I am successful next time?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 29, 2010
at 06:38 PM

my bad, should have clarified , not the machine, stair climbing at the stadium etc.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 29, 2010
at 04:15 PM

Never use stair-climbers, always use real stairs.

A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

(4183)

on August 29, 2010
at 12:34 PM

Not very rugged, like a vertical hike, no sheer cliff faces to scale or anything.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on August 29, 2010
at 12:30 PM

I would caution someone using a stairclimber to avoid using a "chronic cardio" pace (above 75% of maximum heart rate), except during high-intensity intervals.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on August 29, 2010
at 12:23 PM

You don't say how steep or rugged the terrain is. A climbing wall is great training for a very steep trail or a boulder-strewn scamper.

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3 Answers

best answer

4
Fd0633a7758ad83a5fa785e88a0cc00f

(281)

on August 29, 2010
at 03:48 PM

The best way to climb a mountain such as you have described is to climb that mountain...sounds silly...not really. If you have the advantage of proximity with your desired goal continue attempting it...each time try for a higher target. 500 ft, 1000ft, 1500 ft, summit. When I trained for my Mt. Rainier climb a few years back that's how I achieved it. There is no better way to ready your body for a climb than by the act of climbing itself.

1
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on August 29, 2010
at 02:30 PM

When I was doing rock-climbing (in like Victorian era or something), the most important to focus on was, aside from stretching, pull ups (one handed, on just fingers, one hand lower etc.) and squats (one leg/pistol) variations, like "frog jumps" (in squat position jump for some 20-30 yards and back), or low "squat crawl" - you try to "walk" ahead very low in squat position.

We had a rope ladder that was hung more or less in loose "L" shape - part of it was horizontal and then started to go vertical, I never could climb the vertical one ;-) but guys were doing it - either one by one hand, or even explosive.

pull ups were common also on just middle fingers, I could do it on door frame on just fingers. These were the times... ;-)

try also to strengthen your calves and feet (as a lot of climbing is on your toes) - do sumo squats on your toes or do calf rises standing on an edge of a bench or step. Do a lot of stretching, with emphasis on inner thighs and crotch, you want to be as close to the wall as you can. we called that "frog" stretch :)

push ups are also very important - most of your work in climbing you do with your arms, very strong core. I hope that's helpful even if chaotic.

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on August 29, 2010
at 11:09 AM

Hill Sprints, Stairclimbers, and alot of fun days on unpaved hiking trails.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on August 29, 2010
at 06:38 PM

my bad, should have clarified , not the machine, stair climbing at the stadium etc.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on August 29, 2010
at 04:15 PM

Never use stair-climbers, always use real stairs.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on August 29, 2010
at 12:30 PM

I would caution someone using a stairclimber to avoid using a "chronic cardio" pace (above 75% of maximum heart rate), except during high-intensity intervals.

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