1

votes

How important is exercise for longevity?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 27, 2012 at 6:20 PM

By going from a sedentary to a moderately active lifestyle I've noticed marked improvements in CV risk factors HDL (higher) and systolic blood pressure (lower). Some of this improvement would have been achieved solely by diet, as I also lost weight. But the following study indicates another anti-aging benefit from exercise, due to autophagy:

http://www.hhmi.org/news/levine20120118.html

Mostly mouse studies, but whatever. I don't know whether this has been hacked already, but I'd appreciate any paleo opinion on the subject.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

What's scarier is seeing adipose fat images through the midsection of an obese person. The internal organs rest in a fat pack.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on January 28, 2012
at 02:35 AM

That link is so very cool. But the one thing that I wonder about is upper body musculature. Since these were endurance triathletes I reckon their legs get more action than their upper body. However, it is telling of the potential of a lifetime of activity. So much HOPE!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:21 PM

Thanks Travis. The Harvard study brackets my age, and is reasonably large. There is good quantification on intensity. Walking raises my resting metabolic rate 3-4x, from 70 to as high as 300 kcal/hr, so falls into the low intensity group. Jogging/biking would move it mid-level, running/lap swimming/football would move it to the high level. I don't see anything on the cumulative effect (how much and/or how long), and given the nature of the study maybe this was too much to expect from the survey participants.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:10 PM

There are implications of diet synergy in some of the studies. Calorie restriction by itself - to near starvation levels in dome cases - has been shown to increase longevity.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 27, 2012
at 07:03 PM

Active is better than sedentary, but those people would likely be healthier if they engaged in resistance exercise in addition to the walking or whatever they do. It strengthens bones, improves glucose tolerance etc. etc.

Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on January 27, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Hi, Travis. I enjoy your posts here. Every time I see or read about a long-living person, I always seem to read that they've been active and vigorous people. I don't see that they intensely exercised consistently throughout life.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 27, 2012
at 06:49 PM

Wow...thanks for the link!

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4 Answers

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1
Medium avatar

on January 27, 2012
at 06:52 PM

http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/273/15/1179.short

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/151/3/293.short

High intensity exercise seems to correlate better to increased longevity due, I would imagine, to the maintenance of a healthy population of mitochondria.

Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on January 27, 2012
at 06:57 PM

Hi, Travis. I enjoy your posts here. Every time I see or read about a long-living person, I always seem to read that they've been active and vigorous people. I don't see that they intensely exercised consistently throughout life.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 27, 2012
at 07:03 PM

Active is better than sedentary, but those people would likely be healthier if they engaged in resistance exercise in addition to the walking or whatever they do. It strengthens bones, improves glucose tolerance etc. etc.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:21 PM

Thanks Travis. The Harvard study brackets my age, and is reasonably large. There is good quantification on intensity. Walking raises my resting metabolic rate 3-4x, from 70 to as high as 300 kcal/hr, so falls into the low intensity group. Jogging/biking would move it mid-level, running/lap swimming/football would move it to the high level. I don't see anything on the cumulative effect (how much and/or how long), and given the nature of the study maybe this was too much to expect from the survey participants.

7
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on January 27, 2012
at 06:32 PM

It appears to be very important.

Look at this link I got from fellow member Bea Arthur Devany:

http://www.bettermovement.org/2012/use-or-lose-looks-like/

Medium avatar

(39821)

on January 27, 2012
at 06:49 PM

Wow...thanks for the link!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

What's scarier is seeing adipose fat images through the midsection of an obese person. The internal organs rest in a fat pack.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on January 28, 2012
at 02:35 AM

That link is so very cool. But the one thing that I wonder about is upper body musculature. Since these were endurance triathletes I reckon their legs get more action than their upper body. However, it is telling of the potential of a lifetime of activity. So much HOPE!

1
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on January 27, 2012
at 06:48 PM

Live a healthy, active and involved lifestyle. Can we really give more and better advice than that?

My opinion is that we can't.

1
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on January 27, 2012
at 06:32 PM

I think the paleo perspective is that we can't quantify it. There's research that suggests you can overdo it, but also indications that it is at least very hard to maintain a healthy lifestyle that isn't active to some extent. Infrequent but vigorous exertion seems prudent.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:10 PM

There are implications of diet synergy in some of the studies. Calorie restriction by itself - to near starvation levels in dome cases - has been shown to increase longevity.

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