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Have you found your "Want to Exercise Switch?"

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 20, 2011 at 3:36 PM

In Dr. Lustig's famous Sugar the Bitter Truth presentation he mentioned that when they gave obese kids insulin spuppressing drugs the kids started losing weight and exercising spontaneously.

Another overwieght blogger mentioned spontaneous exercise desire and weight loss when she was prescribed a particular medication for sleep.

Have you found your Spontaneous Exercise Switch?

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on November 21, 2011
at 07:25 PM

same here. too bad all we have here in Pittsburgh November thru March is clouds :(

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on November 21, 2011
at 05:25 AM

http://www.doctorezrin.com/pages/464980/index.htm

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 20, 2011
at 06:44 PM

I'm with Nance. When the sun is shining out, I just have to get out there and soak it up. I go for a walk, or a slow run, or whatever, just to be outside.

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9 Answers

6
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 20, 2011
at 04:06 PM

Yes, I think I have. To qualify this, I'll say that when I was very much younger, I was also very active -- soccer, field hockey, rugby, lacrosse, swimming, volleyball, track and field (mostly field)... I was constantly doing -something- active. Then I got married to a soldier (we were moving around a lot, so joining teams wasn't as easy), and had babies (yet another blow to getting out and doing stuff), was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, and, frankly, I "wallowed" -- In truth, I hadn't realized I was grieving until I'd gotten up over 450 lbs and one of my greatest fears became a reality (being unable to be independent and take care of myself). After 2 years in a mobility device, I had NO urge whatsoever to exercise, and I resigned myself to a life in a wheelchair.

I don't know what changed, really -- the first change, though, I think, was my holistic neurologist taking me off all grains and putting me on a high-saturated-fat, moderate protein, low-moderate carb diet and taking away my regular shoes and putting me in minimalist footwear.

The restoration of my "want to exercise" switch being turned "on" started out with just little things -- like just wanting to walk in the grocery store, instead of using the riding cart. Now, I trust that part of me that says "Hey, I really feel like working out" -- and I also trust the voice that says "I think working out today wouldn't really help" -- it took me over 2 years to get to this point, but for now, it's working well for me, and I'm no longer in a mobility chair, and down far enough under 300 lbs that I am able to do a large portion of the things I used to enjoy -- and just the other day, I went looking for a local recreational rugby or lacrosse team -- fave sports... would LOVE to be able to play again, just for fun.

5
Medium avatar

(19469)

on November 20, 2011
at 05:07 PM

I always remind myself that I don't "have to" do anything. I don't "have to" eat healthy foods. I don't "have to" exercise. I don't "have to" strive for continuous self-improvement, relationships, professionalism, etc.

This automatically opens up the question, "What do I choose to do?" and inevitably, what I choose to do is what I "want to" do. What interests me, what gives me energy, what inspires, motivates, and opens me up to new ways of experiencing life.

5
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 20, 2011
at 04:39 PM

I admit it's less about me and more about what's going on outside. Give me a nice sunny morning and unless I was on a binge or something the day before I get a strong urge to "move around naturally." Seriously, I love to go for a long walk on beautiful mornings. I dig the outdoors.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on November 21, 2011
at 07:25 PM

same here. too bad all we have here in Pittsburgh November thru March is clouds :(

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 20, 2011
at 06:44 PM

I'm with Nance. When the sun is shining out, I just have to get out there and soak it up. I go for a walk, or a slow run, or whatever, just to be outside.

3
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on November 20, 2011
at 06:09 PM

What has really helped me is finding exercise that is not a chore, doesn't take long, and doesn't require any commuting. For years I tried to go to the gym, which I find really boring, but I did for a while anyway. And driving through traffic once or twice to get there made it eventually impossible to stick with.

I started to run, which I liked a lot better because I could do it anywhere, anytime, and needed only a decent pair of shoes and shorts. However, I am not really much of a runner (heavy set, short arms and legs). After I was running about 4 miles at a time 3-4x per week, and it started to get pretty time consuming.

The best thing I've done so far is do intense kettlebell and/or floor exercise workouts, which I can do at home or while traveling in about 20-30 minutes, and only need about 2 of them per week to stay fit. I can do 3-4 per week if I have the time, but it is very easy to stick with exercise that takes about an hour per week.

I also started to commute via train/bus which involves about 30 minutes of brisk walking per day, which has been fantastic.

1
D81880919f3d4b75b6ca8380914137d1

on November 21, 2011
at 05:31 AM

I get a really uncomfortable feeling all over my body when I go for extended periods (over 24 hours) without low level cardio exercise (walking, hiking, yoga, etc.) or if I go longer than about a week without intense exercise (HIIT). Being sedentary for too long or not exercising hard enough causes me to fidget and also not sleep well (restless legs). Oftentimes, I will spontaneously find myself jumping on the monkey bars and other equipment at playgrounds. Could it be because I keep my fasting insulin and blood glucose levels low? Maybe.

1
792634a784ec6a636c3137d0903e11b4

(1196)

on November 20, 2011
at 06:10 PM

I found mine in September :-). Seriously, after 48 years of hating exercise and struggling with lack of strength, lack of fitness and major lack of motivation, I just decided I wanted to do it. Since then I've started a basic strength programme and increased my slow movement exponentially. I can do girly pushups for the first time in my life - 5 in a row!! I still need a pole to stay steady when I squat, but I'm up to 2 sets of 20.

I attribute this personality change to a couple of things - firstly 7 months of Paleo eating allowed me to get a level of predictability into managing IBS, secondly I learned about how to be effective at exercise - I don't know that the switch would have tripped if I thought I had to jog or ride a bike for an hour, and thirdly I learned how to eat for energy, specifically coconut cream and carbs.

FWIW, I'm still 20-30kg overweight - I've lost 10kg, but I don't think that's the switch.

1
F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on November 20, 2011
at 05:06 PM

I had the opposite experience. My whole adult life, I exercised intensely 3-5 times a week. When I went Primal and lost the extra 15 pounds I was carrying around, I got lazy. This happened to coincide with a knee injury from running, so I decided to really rest it. But my urge to exercise hasn't returned.

For me, I think carbs were driving me to need to burn off excess energy. I also had anxiety and fidgeted a lot more than I do now.

I organize a playground workout once a week, so I'm guaranteed that. I try to squeeze in some light trail running, swimming, and yoga when I can. When I exercise now, it's for pure pleasure. What a gift.

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on November 21, 2011
at 05:24 AM

IMO, the desire for activity and for eating is hormonally-driven. Dr. Lustig pointed to his study where "fat, lazy" kids had lowered their insulin levels through an experimental drug and the result was that the kids ate better foods and exercised more. Dr. Schwarzbein and Dr. Calvin Ezrin both point to the importance of balancing ALL the hormones. Like Dr. Lustig, they are endocrinologists who deal with obesity issues and seem to share a great wariness of sugar. Schwarzbein seems fixated on balancing insulin, adrenal hormones and other "minor" hormones like other steroids and serotonin, Lustig on insulin and Ezrin on insulin and serotonin. So, the importance of insulin shouldn't be overlooked. I find that I can go into and out of wanting to exercise and eat, depending on my energy level. I suspect it is somewhat thyroid and carb-related. Dr. Kruse refers to this issue as well, with his discussion of the problems of dieting and the resulting changes in thyroid hormones to compensate for a loss in energy intake. This is why the CICO model fails so much and why Schwarzbein says never never never go on a diet!!! Dr. Kruse seems more interested in the leptin side of the equation, even though some folks who have tried the reset program continue to struggle with sleep issues, adrenal issues and depression. Dr. Lustig is surely interested in the insulin and leptin, but it would be interesting to hear his views on the serotonin connection. Perhaps it is not so much a problem for kids as it is for the populations that the other docs see. Dr. Ezrin feels that serotonin is the key and that any program that does not deal with it will fail.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on November 21, 2011
at 05:25 AM

http://www.doctorezrin.com/pages/464980/index.htm

0
724ba4f39f7bbea7f74b45c0a79615f2

on November 20, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Personally, I've stopped worrying about what counts as "exercise." I used to hate running, like really really hate it, so I never thought I'd be one of those exercise-y people, especially since a back surgery in my teens laid me flat on my ass for a long time, so I was never especially fit. I was also angsty, and angsty teens don't exercise :)

But I like walking a lot and pretty much just walk wherever I need to go, it just didn't used to occur to me that it was exercise. Also, other forms of laziness work to my advantage (I would always rather walk across town than have to switch trains on the subway, even if it's two degrees outside). So, I considered myself not an exerciser, per se, but I think I was. Especially when you consider that "hiking" is essentially just walking somewhere when you don't have chores to do.

I eventually started running and started loving it, but only after hating it for like three months until I was finally addicted to it. And this "spontaneous desire to exercise" was really just me having lost a bunch of weight through dieting, realizing I could be one of those girls at the gym that everyone hates and then pretending that I loved running until it became true.

After like three years of it, I got bored and now I don't run anymore. So, I guess technically, I no longer exercise for it's own sake (though I have yet to cancel that damned gym membership). But, I have no doubt that if you followed me around all day, I'd be moving just as much as I used to, just doing different things, some more obvious (rock climbing) some less (jiggling my leg because I'm impatient).

Ok, so that was long and didn't really answer your question. But, I think a lot of people exercise and just aren't totally aware of it.

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