7

votes

Has anyone given up exercise completely?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 05, 2012 at 9:51 PM

Has anyone here taken up exercise, but then decided that life was better without it?

I grew up a pretty sedentary (and chubby) kid, only going outside to play on occasion, always hating gym class, and never playing sports. I was overweight in high school, and then at around 19 years old I started watching my diet and exercising. I took up running primarily, and soon added weight lifting, and over the next 10 years I did various combinations of weekly running and weight lifting at varying intensities. My workouts were always short, and I've never done more that 45 minute workouts 6 times a week (and that would only be during times when I had almost no other stress, like summer break from college), and I'd say I averaged 3 workouts per week at about 45 min each over the past 10 years.

Lately I've been reducing my workouts due to lack of energy, and general feelings of stress and exhaustion, even though my job is great and I have no outside obligations taking any energy (I'm married and don't have kids, so life is pretty smooth right now). For the past several months though, I've scaled back to one weight-lifting workout per week, and even that feels like it just leaves me wiped. I try to walk every day after breakfast, and even that is starting to feel exhausting. I've tried diet tweaks up the wazoo and have found a great deal of stress reduction and energy with the diet I'm following now, but working out hasn't gotten any better. So, I'm considering dropping working out all together to see how I feel, but I'm afraid to because of the overwhelming evidence that exercise keeps you healthy. I'm wondering though if because I grew up as a couch potato, is that how I function optimally?

Have any of you decided that exercise is just not for you? Do any of you always feel worse after you exercise? Are there any totally happy paleo couch potatoes out there? Are there any tribes or ancient cultures who were/are known couch potatoes?

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 10, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Thanks. What did I miss? I get voted down a lot. Paleo attracts a diverse crowd. I think some don't believe what us train wrecks have been through.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 10, 2012
at 12:25 AM

As I said on Apex's response, I hate when people downvote and don't say why - I appreciate your comments on this thread and the info about your adrenal fatigue!

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 10, 2012
at 12:24 AM

I hate when people downvote and don't say why - it wasn't a bad answer, and I appreciate your input! Plus, I agree that not enough carbs might have been an issue.

Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on March 07, 2012
at 08:16 PM

Hmmm... I'm guessing the downvote was for the suggestion of carbs?

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:35 PM

Thanks heather! I'm really happy to see that there are so many healthy alternatives to regimented exercise that people have found! I definitely don't want to be a couch potato. That's really interesting that you mentioned your tummy being swollen and flabby, and your face fat-free - I have noticed a similar shift myself in the past few years!

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:27 PM

Thanks DFH and Soporificat! I definitely didn't realize that it could take so long to recover from adrenal burnout. I recently got my diet to a place where I'm starting to feel a lot better, but that was mere weeks ago :) Patience is not my strong point, so I think I was expecting to bounce back at the gym immediately. I think I might just need a lot more time to get better, and as suggested by a few other responses, I maybe should not expect workout at the level I was at.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:18 PM

Thanks for sharing your experience! It's good to hear from people going through the same thing, who found a solution. I agree that looking at a lot of people while they exercise, they look like they are trying to beat themselves up more than do something healthy for themselves. Maybe I just need to let go of the idea that we need to do set workouts several times a week to be happy and healthy.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:08 PM

I definitely like this idea! The weather has been gorgeous lately as well, so this is a great suggestion! My walks tend to be more focused on exercise and almost exclusively inside, and leisurely fun walks outdoors are something I haven't done regularly in years. Thanks!

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 06, 2012
at 03:11 AM

One other thing to toss out there, I was a journalist in a strenuous Motorsport. It's hard on atheletes. About 10 years ago, or less, pros started missing events, and they would be out like 6 months. They just shut down. We heard it was EBV, a virus we all have and it's opportunistic, if your immune system is weak enough, it spreads. They were doing 30+ competitions a year and suffering from overtraining and fatigue. Some hired trainers from cycling and within a year, never heard of it again, but I know one trainer at least was watching his clients white cell count for this.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 06, 2012
at 03:06 AM

It certainly does. I have been there. I know what it feels like to wake up with an extra 100 holding you down, and you just don't want to get up, even to pee.

Cd717290eb43a6e17061f9920deed977

(1267)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:58 AM

What DFH said is right. It could be quick or it could be never, or anywhere in between. I actually went on medication (Cortef) for the adrenal problem, but now I'm well enough that I don't take it any more. Non-drug things that helped me are: eliminating all stimulants (caffeine especially), discovering any food sensitivities I had (gluten and dairy, sigh), getting lots of deep sleep, not doing ANY exercise for awhile, then very gently adding in physical activity.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:17 AM

I agree - it didn't occur to me that that could be my problem until I started getting responses on here, and now it seems obvious to me! I have a lot of issues with stress/cortisol/symptoms of adrenal fatigue, and I just thought that my workouts were contributing to my symptoms, but I wasn't thinking that a symptom could be inability to get moving, if that makes any sense.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:13 AM

Well, I'm with you on the once/week - I never work a body part more than once/wk with weights. When I was doing 6 times/wk (which I've only done for at most 3 months at a time, probably twice in the past 10 years), it was alternating weight days with running/cadio days, and the weight routines were splits (back/core, chest/shoulders, legs - along those lines). Now I do a full-body routine once per week, and haven't done any cardio since August. I assumed I'd feel better by now, but I don't.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 11:15 PM

I actually just started taking magnesium and D3 because I have other symptoms of magnesium deficiency, and I have no idea if I'm anemic (another reason to get some tests at the Dr). And I might try upping my carbs more - I've only added a piece of fruit per meal, but still focus on the meat and fat. Thanks Travis!

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:50 PM

Mine was both. No way to predict recovery. Many problems like that run together so it depends on the scope. It took years to even find the right doc. After that, 6-12 months. Could just be over training and you don't even need a doc. Do vit D3 too.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:46 PM

It may also be that your current carb intake is still insufficient. I find that the amount of carbs I need from fruit is quite a lot larger than I would have expected given the amount that is sufficient from tubers.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:46 PM

Hmm, have you ruled out things like anemia and magnesium deficiency?

8634d4988ced45a68e2a79e69cc01835

(1617)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:35 PM

The water retention really confused me too. I couldn't get my rings on! I'd have to gain 30+lbs for my rings not to fit anymore! But the scale only showed 5lbs or so. I drank gallons of water and tried natural diuretics to get rid of it, and it didn't budge. Once I took that break, it disappeared! It's amazing what some good rest will do for you. I was killing myself working out and getting NO results. In fact, my performance had been suffering more and more for weeks. I was so frustrated. Apparently the flu is what I needed to prove to me that I was wrong and needed a break!

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:27 PM

Good suggestion, thanks! How did you recover from your adrenal issue? How long did it take?

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:22 PM

I think a couple of weeks off and a check-up with the doctor is probably a good idea. I'm kind of glad no one is answering with "you just need to never workout," because I like working out. Although I'm kind of disappointed that there probably aren't any ancient cultures that sat around waiting for food to come to them...

Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on March 05, 2012
at 10:20 PM

I do not consider walking cardio, and am generally pretty active. I just don't run/bike/eliptical etc. I would run this by a doctor, especially if you have a good one.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:20 PM

It's interesting you mentioned depression and water retention, because those both have popped up very frequently since this whole "exhaustion" thing started for me. I'm also glad you gave your workout schedule - that sounds similar to the workout I had for years, but I only ever thrived on that schedule when I was in college (and not working 40+ hours per week). Maybe I do just need a couple of weeks of complete rest, and then I can ease back into a gentler routine. Thanks!

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Do you consider walking cardio? I haven't gone on a run since August, and I don't lift more than once a week, so I don't think it's burnout. I also eat quite a bit in an attempt to keep my energy up, and have been steadily gaining a pound or two every few months ever since the exhausted feeling started. As I'm typing this, that kind of sounds like some kind of thyroid or metabolic disorder... maybe I just need a visit to the doc...

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:09 PM

...and before I went paleo, I was the typical exerciser who ate small, balanced meals and snacks 6 times a day. I ate what I thought were "natural" foods, had plenty of carbs and protein, and was generally not afraid of fats, it was just lots of wheat, grains, and PUFAs. It was while on this diet that I started to get worn out.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:07 PM

Over the past year I've had on-and-off carb restriction, and that had a definite, immediate impact on my workouts, which I had kind of expected. But the problem of workouts getting more and more exhausting had been happening for a couple of years leading up to my discovery of paleo a year ago, and didn't improve after that. I went strict paleo about 5 weeks ago, and about a week ago added OJ and fruit, but none of this has changed anything (though I know 5 weeks is not a long time). I'm wondering if I should just try stepping up my workouts again, and see if I can adapt now with a clean diet.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 05, 2012
at 09:52 PM

Are you working out alongside carbohydrate restriction?

  • 03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

    asked by

    (793)
  • Views
    2K
  • Last Activity
    1433D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

13 Answers

7
8634d4988ced45a68e2a79e69cc01835

(1617)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:14 PM

Either you've developed a health problem, or you're burning out/overtraining. I refused to believe I was overtraining UP and DOWN recently. But my usual workouts were torture, I was constantly tired, depressed, and I started retaining LOADS of water that would not go away. I run 5 miles 3 days a week, and to HIIT for 30 mins two days a week. This might not sound like much to many of you, but evidently for me, this was too much. And I never ever missed a workout...ever. I got sick with the flu and took 5 days off. I slept a TON and rested, no workouts. Lo and Behold....I come back feeling amazing. Water retention gone, depression gone, energy back!

My advice is to take a week or two off. Take a break, then ease back into it. I'm back to my regular workout routine and feel good. But, I am going to work in some breaks/rest weeks throughout the year instead of being SO hardcore about never missing no matter how bad I feel. That really backfired on me. So take a break and then see how you feel. I wouldn't stop workout out completely. There are way too many benefits!

8634d4988ced45a68e2a79e69cc01835

(1617)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:35 PM

The water retention really confused me too. I couldn't get my rings on! I'd have to gain 30+lbs for my rings not to fit anymore! But the scale only showed 5lbs or so. I drank gallons of water and tried natural diuretics to get rid of it, and it didn't budge. Once I took that break, it disappeared! It's amazing what some good rest will do for you. I was killing myself working out and getting NO results. In fact, my performance had been suffering more and more for weeks. I was so frustrated. Apparently the flu is what I needed to prove to me that I was wrong and needed a break!

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:20 PM

It's interesting you mentioned depression and water retention, because those both have popped up very frequently since this whole "exhaustion" thing started for me. I'm also glad you gave your workout schedule - that sounds similar to the workout I had for years, but I only ever thrived on that schedule when I was in college (and not working 40+ hours per week). Maybe I do just need a couple of weeks of complete rest, and then I can ease back into a gentler routine. Thanks!

3
Aa6717c2a045f299009541b941e8a821

(340)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:51 AM

I too was similar to you. I was a chubby child & only got into exercise in my early 20s. I trained intensely & even competed in a body building competition. However, after a while, I hit a brick wall (probably due to adrenals) & stopped the weight training. Not only was I finding that it was physically exhausting, but also it was mentally exhausting. I went from a 'happy go lucky' sort of person to a tired, depressed person. Sometimes, when I would finish a workout I would go home and sleep for hours. Obviously there was something wrong!

Like you, I ate similar to you & found that did nothing for my sugar levels, energy levels. Paleo has really helped with that (which I think relates to my higher fat consumption & better nutrition) and I find that I don't see food as such a necessity anymore, meaning that when I weight trained I could literally EAT and EAT and never seem to get full. I like Taubes idea on this one & it really makes a lot of sense.

Now in my late 30s, I have found a balance for me. I try to walk 5 times a week & try to stand as much as possible at my desk. I also work long hours & don't have a heap of time to spend exercising like crazy. I am happier spending my time making bone broth or reading, or spending time outdoors. I truly believe that this is better for my soul.

I do wonder though if "exercise" is really natural. I see all the people out jogging with strained faces & terrible running styles & wonder if they are really enjoying what they are doing & whether they are really doing it for the right reasons. However, when I spot walkers or people "playing" outside, they are always smiling & having fun. I also think exercise is used in our society as a justification of eating bad & SAD & not for the pure pleasure.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:18 PM

Thanks for sharing your experience! It's good to hear from people going through the same thing, who found a solution. I agree that looking at a lot of people while they exercise, they look like they are trying to beat themselves up more than do something healthy for themselves. Maybe I just need to let go of the idea that we need to do set workouts several times a week to be happy and healthy.

3
07c86972a3bea0b0dc17752e9d2f5642

on March 05, 2012
at 10:29 PM

Goal orientated, regimented "I gotta do this 3 days a week," excercise has no place in my life anymore. But that doesn't mean I am innactive. In fact I walk probably 2-5 hours total everyday just going about my business (running errands, recreation). Plus I dance like crazy around the house, jumping and spinning around - it's rather embarrassing, but I love music, haha, I can't help myself. Plus my job does require occasonal lifting and moving of heavy equipment. I'd go nuts as a couch potato, but I eat a lot of carbs, so I guess my metabolism is driving me to move.

I think being active is good in general because your appetite is stronger and you are able to consume more food and therefore more nutrients. I don't think you have to worry about regimented workouts unless you have specific goals in mind, like body builders, or a specific weight/measurement. I don't care anymore if my weight fluctuates a little or what size my clothes are, so I don't workout. As long as my tummy is flat, my face is plump (in the depths of my chronic diet and exercising, my stomach was swollen and flabby and I lost all the fat on my face, it was not pretty) and my body feels strong, I'm happy.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:35 PM

Thanks heather! I'm really happy to see that there are so many healthy alternatives to regimented exercise that people have found! I definitely don't want to be a couch potato. That's really interesting that you mentioned your tummy being swollen and flabby, and your face fat-free - I have noticed a similar shift myself in the past few years!

3
Ee70ee808f748374744404a00e1c22ed

(1163)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:14 PM

Any other symptoms besides fatigue? I would up your carbs and calories, take a week off, and see how you feel. If it continues, I would go see a doctor, and just make sure it isn't anything that could be serious.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:22 PM

I think a couple of weeks off and a check-up with the doctor is probably a good idea. I'm kind of glad no one is answering with "you just need to never workout," because I like working out. Although I'm kind of disappointed that there probably aren't any ancient cultures that sat around waiting for food to come to them...

2
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on March 06, 2012
at 07:51 AM

I think a lot of these answers are great, and you probably are well served by following the advice to take a break and see a doctor if your fatigue doesn't lift. But I'd add one thing - during your week or two-week "exercise holiday" why not just go out for some leisurely walks, preferably on a trail somewhere - walks whose purpose is NOT exercise. You go as far as you want, as slowly as you want, for how long you want, and just experience the feeling of being outside. Listen to the birds. Sit on a bench and read a book partway through. Collect some stones or twigs or something on the way. Exchange greetings with other humans you encounter en route. When you feel like turning back, just turn back. But don't listen to music, and don't calculate how far you've gone. Maybe you could even borrow someone else's dog for company if you don't have your own.

It's very therapeutic to reconnect with nature, slow yourself down, and stop chasing after goals all the livelong day. Our culture makes doing that difficult. Slowing down and getting outside has always helped me through difficult periods.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:08 PM

I definitely like this idea! The weather has been gorgeous lately as well, so this is a great suggestion! My walks tend to be more focused on exercise and almost exclusively inside, and leisurely fun walks outdoors are something I haven't done regularly in years. Thanks!

2
6227fd1539fcb73dafd953ccf3210b52

on March 05, 2012
at 11:42 PM

> 45 minute workouts 6 times a week

6 times a week ??? Let me explain my point of view on this. You are overtrained !

The workout is the stimulation, the good that is provide happen when you rest, after the stimulation ... In the 24hours following the stimulation your body is most likly in a catabolic trying to reach back the homeostasis, after that come the Anabolic window, thats when your body release testosterone, growth hormone and other anabolics ... to regenerate you and make you stronger. This windows last about 24hours .... Moreover, the musculare damage caused by a good bodybuilding workout can take up to 10days to fully recover.

So the next workout sould never be sooner than 48Hours and should target another area. Most people who do not use steroid have better result with 2, maximum 3 workout sesions per week.

Personnaly I got my best result with 1 high intensity full body workout per week. Again, the magic append when your REST !!!! The workout is just a simulus ....

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:13 AM

Well, I'm with you on the once/week - I never work a body part more than once/wk with weights. When I was doing 6 times/wk (which I've only done for at most 3 months at a time, probably twice in the past 10 years), it was alternating weight days with running/cadio days, and the weight routines were splits (back/core, chest/shoulders, legs - along those lines). Now I do a full-body routine once per week, and haven't done any cardio since August. I assumed I'd feel better by now, but I don't.

2
Cd717290eb43a6e17061f9920deed977

on March 05, 2012
at 10:24 PM

If you have some kind of adrenal gland disfunction/low-function that will result in an inability to recover from any kind of effort.

I had an adrenal problem last year, and if I did a 30 minute, fairly mild work-out it would take me an entire week to recover. That is in contrast to the way it used to be, which was that a workout would invigorate me. It would give me more energy, not totally drain me.

So, adrenal issues are the first thing I would look into. You can get your cortisol levels measured with a saliva test.

Thyroid would be the next possibility I would look into. Actually, adrenal issues and thyroid issues are often fellow travelers.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:50 PM

Mine was both. No way to predict recovery. Many problems like that run together so it depends on the scope. It took years to even find the right doc. After that, 6-12 months. Could just be over training and you don't even need a doc. Do vit D3 too.

Cd717290eb43a6e17061f9920deed977

(1267)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:58 AM

What DFH said is right. It could be quick or it could be never, or anywhere in between. I actually went on medication (Cortef) for the adrenal problem, but now I'm well enough that I don't take it any more. Non-drug things that helped me are: eliminating all stimulants (caffeine especially), discovering any food sensitivities I had (gluten and dairy, sigh), getting lots of deep sleep, not doing ANY exercise for awhile, then very gently adding in physical activity.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:27 PM

Good suggestion, thanks! How did you recover from your adrenal issue? How long did it take?

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:27 PM

Thanks DFH and Soporificat! I definitely didn't realize that it could take so long to recover from adrenal burnout. I recently got my diet to a place where I'm starting to feel a lot better, but that was mere weeks ago :) Patience is not my strong point, so I think I was expecting to bounce back at the gym immediately. I think I might just need a lot more time to get better, and as suggested by a few other responses, I maybe should not expect workout at the level I was at.

1
0cddf17fbd678b897beeace676b0df92

on March 06, 2012
at 12:51 AM

If I was you I'd get my thyroid checked and hormones (adrenals) tested.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 06, 2012
at 03:06 AM

It certainly does. I have been there. I know what it feels like to wake up with an extra 100 holding you down, and you just don't want to get up, even to pee.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 06, 2012
at 02:17 AM

I agree - it didn't occur to me that that could be my problem until I started getting responses on here, and now it seems obvious to me! I have a lot of issues with stress/cortisol/symptoms of adrenal fatigue, and I just thought that my workouts were contributing to my symptoms, but I wasn't thinking that a symptom could be inability to get moving, if that makes any sense.

1
3b5da1658f90a12e9a87036ed3d9cac6

on March 05, 2012
at 11:20 PM

How much water are you drinking? Could it be dehydration?

1
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:51 PM

I've never been excited about the prospect of "working out" (never, ever), but I since I wear myself out at work for several hours straight each day (constantly getting up and down, walking to and fro, answering the portable phone and taking orders, from right after lunch until 5:30pm), I figure that puts enough of a stressful load on my body that allows me to eat plenty of carbs and not gain weight. Would I like to gain some lean muscle? Sure, who wouldn't? But when I wind up falling asleep in my den room chair at 8:30 on any given weeknight, I figure that the last thing I need is to put more stress on my body by forcing myself to do weight training or run around my several acres of property.

I think if I were able to take naps during my lunch break, like I used to do, I wouldn't feel so pooped. But when you own and operate your small business and it's just you, your boyfriend and your FIL running the show, you can't really afford slack off for an hour every day.

1
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:49 PM

For me had nothing to do with carbs or diet. I would burn out cause I was use to working out at a semi-elite level from my younger days. As I got older, family, job, other time constraints and stresses AND working out like I was preparing for high level competition just led to me being pissed at my slow progress and worse recurring nagging injuries.

So I cut WAY back. I do a Body by Science type work out 1x/week. That is it for planned regimented exercise. Everything else is play. Been doing this for 4 months now and its been the longest I've gone with no burnout or injury from an exercise program. Sometimes less is more.

0
Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on March 05, 2012
at 10:05 PM

I weight-train, but do no "cardio".

You may need more carbs or calories.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 05, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Do you consider walking cardio? I haven't gone on a run since August, and I don't lift more than once a week, so I don't think it's burnout. I also eat quite a bit in an attempt to keep my energy up, and have been steadily gaining a pound or two every few months ever since the exhausted feeling started. As I'm typing this, that kind of sounds like some kind of thyroid or metabolic disorder... maybe I just need a visit to the doc...

Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on March 05, 2012
at 10:20 PM

I do not consider walking cardio, and am generally pretty active. I just don't run/bike/eliptical etc. I would run this by a doctor, especially if you have a good one.

Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on March 07, 2012
at 08:16 PM

Hmmm... I'm guessing the downvote was for the suggestion of carbs?

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 10, 2012
at 12:24 AM

I hate when people downvote and don't say why - it wasn't a bad answer, and I appreciate your input! Plus, I agree that not enough carbs might have been an issue.

0
E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 05, 2012
at 09:59 PM

It's something else. That's a lot of working out. Sounds like burnout. Take a break and go back.

Sheesh I was a potato and just joined up Saturday... get back in there

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 10, 2012
at 01:34 AM

Thanks. What did I miss? I get voted down a lot. Paleo attracts a diverse crowd. I think some don't believe what us train wrecks have been through.

03bb06ced2ae02a265909342d4cf3e75

(793)

on March 10, 2012
at 12:25 AM

As I said on Apex's response, I hate when people downvote and don't say why - I appreciate your comments on this thread and the info about your adrenal fatigue!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!