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Fasting + aerobic exercise

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 15, 2010 at 9:02 PM

I've heard a lot about strength training in a fasted state (mostly good things), but not so much about aerobic exercise in a fasted state. Are there similar benefits for the latter?

D05e94d3fa7fbf32eb56445ad932f654

(773)

on November 15, 2010
at 10:02 PM

Thanks a lot for this, CT.

D05e94d3fa7fbf32eb56445ad932f654

(773)

on November 15, 2010
at 10:01 PM

Cool! Your input makes me feel pretty good about this.

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4 Answers

4
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on November 15, 2010
at 10:45 PM

Here's What Martin Berkhan of Leangains says: (go down to #9)

A large body of research on sports performance during Ramadan concludes that aerobic activities, such as 60 minutes of running, has a small yet significant negative impact on performance. A very large confounder here is dehydration, as Ramadan fasting involves fluid restriction. That said, anaerobic performance, such as weight training, is much less impacted.

However, more relevant and telling studies, which don't involve fluid restriction, show that strength and lower intensity endurance training is unaffected - even after 3.5 days of fasting. New research on fasted training supports this. If you read my review of that study, you'll see that the only parameter the fed group did better on was improvements in V02max, which is likely explained by the fact that the carbs allowed them to train at a higher intensity. However, note the other interesting results obtained in the fasted group. Also note that a review I did of another fasted endurance training study showed no negative effect of fasting on endurance or VO2max (quite the contary in fact). This can be explained by the lower intensity.

In conclusion, training in the fasted state does not affect your performance during weight training, which is what most people reading this are interested in. However, training in a completely fasted state is still not something I recommend for optimal progress. Research is quite clear on the benefits of pre-workout and post-workout protein intake for maximizing protein synthesis. For this reason, I suggest supplementing with 10 g BCAA prior to fasted training.

1
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on November 15, 2010
at 09:49 PM

I began training in a fasted state about 2 months ago. I absolutely love it, and recommend it. Due to the benefits, I recently began playing my soccer games (3 times a week) in the fasted state as well. I don't have much info scientifically to offer, but based on my personal experience, I feel similar results as strength training. I will say, in some of my longer games, towards the end (90 minutes) I do get a little fatigued. Im planning on trying to bring some sweet potato chips, or something of the sort to help with this

D05e94d3fa7fbf32eb56445ad932f654

(773)

on November 15, 2010
at 10:01 PM

Cool! Your input makes me feel pretty good about this.

0
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on November 16, 2010
at 02:14 PM

I have always done my training, endurance, aerobic and strength, first thing in the morning which is basically a short IF (8-10 hrs) and have never had any issues. It actually works best for me. I had a trainer for awhile that really wanted me to try to eat before we trained and it just made me sick. If I do train in the afternoon, I always have to make sure I haven't eaten for a few hours.

I would say just try it out and see how your body reacts.

0
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on November 15, 2010
at 09:55 PM

Some useful answers to my previous question link text

D05e94d3fa7fbf32eb56445ad932f654

(773)

on November 15, 2010
at 10:02 PM

Thanks a lot for this, CT.

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