2

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Anyone still doing Body by Science/HIT/SS?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 15, 2012 at 5:10 PM

I know this has been asked at least twice here http://paleohacks.com/questions/656/body-by-science-hype-hack-paleo....and here....http://paleohacks.com/questions/64789/body-by-science-results, but would like to hear any updates by those who have given this approach to resistance training a go.

I have been working out in about this manner with some little tweaks of my own for about 5 weeks now, and am fairly happy with the overall feel of it. Just curious if anyone has any new opinions on the methodology and or results?

443d09cb00d7c8ba7c28fdfe7bed3f5e

on January 06, 2013
at 06:42 AM

As far as I know, HIT weight training (as per BBS) has the most conclusive science backing it up. Although it's mainly used for metabolic conditioning rather than mass and the like, although I have noticed increasing strength gains in using it. But if you want more varied HIT protocols, and ones for mass/strength primarily, Ellington Darden has many books, all which require sets to failure, no more than 1 set, and Drew Baye has lots of the same on his website primarily for gaining mass which = about 1hr of working out a week.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 15, 2012
at 09:22 PM

Thanks for the response...ya the supper slow "theory" sounds good and all, and with a repaired pec tendon I was hoping it would be a viable method to hit my chest fairly well even though I'm still wary of higher weights on bench. Of course switched to close grip and watching the elbow flair.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 15, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Well that would be were my tweaks are concerned...I don't stick with machine exercises. I do weighted vest body weight exercises in addition to some machines. And I'm definitely not a novice, though I did have a complete rupture of my pec while benching that needed re-attached 2 years ago. Appreciate the links though.

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3 Answers

2
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on January 15, 2012
at 06:49 PM

I started out with HIT 12 years or so ago.

So have almost all of my peers, as well as senior trainers and athletes. One of which (he's in his 70's) trained with AJ, and the other one (my old coach) trained with Mentzer in the late 70's-early 80's.

None of them still use HIT.

Only one or two of them ever bothered with Superslow.

All of them found their real potential physically when they abandoned these concepts, myself included. Some of them might do a Mentzer/Jones/Leistner-influenced "pukefest" on a specific group of exercises once every two months or so, just to push themselves, but for the most part - the concepts have been abandoned for "bigger and better" things. I myself might do 20-rep squats from time-to-time just to remind myself that Gravity is still the boss...

That hopefully answers your questions.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 15, 2012
at 09:22 PM

Thanks for the response...ya the supper slow "theory" sounds good and all, and with a repaired pec tendon I was hoping it would be a viable method to hit my chest fairly well even though I'm still wary of higher weights on bench. Of course switched to close grip and watching the elbow flair.

1
Ee1bd927861d6cfd0d75e91f9622a1c5

(10)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

What are the "bigger and better" things? And what is the science underpinning them?

443d09cb00d7c8ba7c28fdfe7bed3f5e

on January 06, 2013
at 06:42 AM

As far as I know, HIT weight training (as per BBS) has the most conclusive science backing it up. Although it's mainly used for metabolic conditioning rather than mass and the like, although I have noticed increasing strength gains in using it. But if you want more varied HIT protocols, and ones for mass/strength primarily, Ellington Darden has many books, all which require sets to failure, no more than 1 set, and Drew Baye has lots of the same on his website primarily for gaining mass which = about 1hr of working out a week.

1
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on January 15, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Why not just read the original HIT programs by Arthur Jones? They are available for free online, and he has some awesome articles on things like 'Fuel Air Factor' which I think is a must read for anyone. (http://www.arthurjonesexercise.com/Bulletin2/33.PDF)

Nautilus Bulletin #1 and #2 at (http://www.arthurjonesexercise.com/Bulletin2/Bulletin2.html)

Even the inventor of Nautilus machines recommends that people do the Squat/Bench Press/Deadlift/Pullups until they can complete X of body weight.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 15, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Well that would be were my tweaks are concerned...I don't stick with machine exercises. I do weighted vest body weight exercises in addition to some machines. And I'm definitely not a novice, though I did have a complete rupture of my pec while benching that needed re-attached 2 years ago. Appreciate the links though.

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