7

votes

What other foods are we missing/forgetting/ignoring?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 19, 2011 at 1:16 AM

I just ran across this entry in Wikipedia that claims there is evidence that humans have been eating land snails since the Pleistocene: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_snail#Snails_as_human_food

I haven't seen snails or clams or mussels or other freshwater gastropods come up in any paleo discussions, blogs, books (not that I've read any in their entirety), etc. Since our ancestors would have spent most of their time near fresh water lakes and streams if possible, they'd have been eating not just a lot more fresh water fish, but also crustaceans like crayfish, mollusks like bivalves (clams, oysters, scallops) and gastropods (snails). Depending on the region, Grok would have seen bears, raccoons, otters or other animals prying the shells apart and then done the same, no?

(In that sense, I guess this question relates somewhat to the question I asked last night about why we can't just smell something and know if it's good or bad for us.)

I'm suddenly thinking a New England style clam chowder made carefully could be a very yummy paleo soup/stew! Butter, cream, clams, potatoes, onions, a hint of celery... mmmm!!!

So, this has me wondering: what other sorts of foods Grok would have had on his menu that we might still overlook today?

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 25, 2012
at 08:50 PM

I've thought about having a cricket farm, ha ha.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 08:22 PM

That sounds wise, ben

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:21 PM

@Cave, thats why i say just eat your iodine weekly or so in the form of like one tablespoon of dulse flakes. You don't need much, its very concentrated stuff. I would have to think that eating it like this would not go far into adversely affecting hashimoto's land.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on June 19, 2011
at 08:49 AM

I stopped harvesting freshwater mussels when an aquatic entomologist I was working with told me that the mussels I had picked up could be 80 y.o. or more. They're also in decline in the U.S. "The United States has the richest diversity of mussels in the world with about 300 different species. Unfortunately, it is a very endangered group of animals. It is believed that about 10% of the species are already extinct and it is estimated that that 70% are at risk of disappearing." source: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/freshwater-mussels.aspx

0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on June 19, 2011
at 07:00 AM

Me too! I loved to eat my way through a big platter of "fruit de mer" when I was on vacation in france with my parents... even at the age of 3... But now it's just now and then some mussels or escargots...

6235e0b7e3c4c4b9df3d926829bc32f6

(333)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:58 AM

if there was a way for me to purchase insects to eat...I totally would.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:56 AM

Baconbitch, I'm totally jealous!

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 03:01 AM

I figure kefir counts for the 'little wriggly creatures' part of my diet. I'm sure the bacteria would look absolutely chillingly disgusting - but are too small to see (their loss my gain)!

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Oh - on the iodine: you need to be very sure you don't have Hashimoto's, which is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid. Extra iodine can force the thyroid to into overdrive. If it doesn't *cause* Hashimoto's it can certainly make it much worse. Since the disease might have different symptoms, ideally you test for the antibodies in your blood (TPO). Naturally most doctors don't bother so you should ask for it.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:54 AM

Hellz yes..I love snails drowned in butter and garlic. And mussels and oysters. I love this question. I live by the ocean and get my crab right off the boats in bodega bay.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:54 AM

I take similar dessicants, Ben. It seems like a workable way to 'eat' organ meat that's otherwise very hard to find raw and know how to cook properly. And for kelp I get it in powder (MUCH cheaper): http://www.iherb.com/Starwest-Botanicals-Kelp-Powder-Organic-1-lb/22573?at=0

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 02:33 AM

I get 180 kelp capsules by Nature's Way from Amazon which lasts roughly 6 months if taken once a day: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00024D1ZA/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=fabulousme-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399369&creativeASIN=B00024D1ZA It's a lot of kelp (seaweed) once dried into a little supplement. I only take one a day - no more - because the labeling suggests not to, but I don't know why exactly m(has something to do with iodine) but Kelp also has other important minerals.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:32 AM

I would eat ersters everyday if I could! and I LOVE snails! Butter and parsely is all you need!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:31 AM

I wanna do some organ heavy (kidney, brain, liver, etc...), nice and fatty terrine experiments. ever tried making it?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:28 AM

spiders and scorpions taste like crab apparently...pass the clarified butter, parsley and garlic!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:19 AM

$3 at whole foods http://www.vitacost.com/Maine-Coast-Sea-Vegetables-Organic-Kelp-Granules-Salt-Alternative

792634a784ec6a636c3137d0903e11b4

(1196)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:14 AM

Lol, not even the cheese would do it for me!! Google it, you'll see what I mean! There are some awesome traditional food festivals here, where it's still served . . .

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:09 AM

Tell me more about this kelp supplement...

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:59 AM

i talk a LOT, likely too much, about my delicious little mollusc friends! also, do NOT forget about the salt pork in that chowder recipe. DO. NOT.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 01:54 AM

I've been pulling out grass and weeds from my freshly tilled garden, and if they look anything like root grubs... no way... well... unless they're first called something else and smothered with cheese and I'm told over and over again for years that it's popular in France... :p

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 01:53 AM

I hear ya... I ate escargot smothered in cheese three times over a year or so... then one day I ordered them and they arrived in all of their naked glory. I hate to admit it, but they were much harder to eat when there wasn't any cheese to hide their curled up grubby shape and little "feet" if that's what they can be called. I love shrimp and lobster, which are very close cousins of other land insects, but I'd have to be really, really desperate and starving, or offered a MASSIVE sum of money to do it.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 01:51 AM

I have to agree whole heartedly with this. I do like organ meat, but very rarely and usually in the form of liverwurst, which is full of salt and preservatives. I take raw, dessicated adrenal, pituitary and thyroid supplements, one of which also contains spleen and thymus. No doubt it's not as good as doing the real thing, but I feel really fantastic when I take them. I also take a kelp supplement, because I believe you are right on with that one as well!

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6 Answers

7
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:44 AM

Organs. People talk about liver this and organ that a lot but I know about 10 paleo folk and I am the only one who regularly eats any. And even at that, I only do liver, and it's not very frequent. At least not in large amounts. I dont think many paleo people really eat a good amount of organs.

Iodine from sea vegetables is probably though the most glaring, dangerous thing lacking in paleo people's diets.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Oh - on the iodine: you need to be very sure you don't have Hashimoto's, which is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid. Extra iodine can force the thyroid to into overdrive. If it doesn't *cause* Hashimoto's it can certainly make it much worse. Since the disease might have different symptoms, ideally you test for the antibodies in your blood (TPO). Naturally most doctors don't bother so you should ask for it.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:19 AM

$3 at whole foods http://www.vitacost.com/Maine-Coast-Sea-Vegetables-Organic-Kelp-Granules-Salt-Alternative

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:31 AM

I wanna do some organ heavy (kidney, brain, liver, etc...), nice and fatty terrine experiments. ever tried making it?

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:09 AM

Tell me more about this kelp supplement...

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 02:33 AM

I get 180 kelp capsules by Nature's Way from Amazon which lasts roughly 6 months if taken once a day: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00024D1ZA/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=fabulousme-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399369&creativeASIN=B00024D1ZA It's a lot of kelp (seaweed) once dried into a little supplement. I only take one a day - no more - because the labeling suggests not to, but I don't know why exactly m(has something to do with iodine) but Kelp also has other important minerals.

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 01:51 AM

I have to agree whole heartedly with this. I do like organ meat, but very rarely and usually in the form of liverwurst, which is full of salt and preservatives. I take raw, dessicated adrenal, pituitary and thyroid supplements, one of which also contains spleen and thymus. No doubt it's not as good as doing the real thing, but I feel really fantastic when I take them. I also take a kelp supplement, because I believe you are right on with that one as well!

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:54 AM

I take similar dessicants, Ben. It seems like a workable way to 'eat' organ meat that's otherwise very hard to find raw and know how to cook properly. And for kelp I get it in powder (MUCH cheaper): http://www.iherb.com/Starwest-Botanicals-Kelp-Powder-Organic-1-lb/22573?at=0

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:21 PM

@Cave, thats why i say just eat your iodine weekly or so in the form of like one tablespoon of dulse flakes. You don't need much, its very concentrated stuff. I would have to think that eating it like this would not go far into adversely affecting hashimoto's land.

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 08:22 PM

That sounds wise, ben

6
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on June 19, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Westerners generally find the idea of eating insects disgusting (and I'm not fond of the idea myself), but I expect that lots of paleolithic H/G groups probably ate plenty of them.

6235e0b7e3c4c4b9df3d926829bc32f6

(333)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:58 AM

if there was a way for me to purchase insects to eat...I totally would.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:28 AM

spiders and scorpions taste like crab apparently...pass the clarified butter, parsley and garlic!

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 01:53 AM

I hear ya... I ate escargot smothered in cheese three times over a year or so... then one day I ordered them and they arrived in all of their naked glory. I hate to admit it, but they were much harder to eat when there wasn't any cheese to hide their curled up grubby shape and little "feet" if that's what they can be called. I love shrimp and lobster, which are very close cousins of other land insects, but I'd have to be really, really desperate and starving, or offered a MASSIVE sum of money to do it.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 25, 2012
at 08:50 PM

I've thought about having a cricket farm, ha ha.

5
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:27 AM

I have eaten most things that run, crawl, fly or swim, including snails, crickets, grasshoppers, ants, bees, fish roe, clams, squid, etc. The world is abundant with healthy food, trouble is most people, esp in the west have developed a very narrow idea of what can be eaten. On the farm, when I was a kid, we used to shoot starlings (a smallish bird) lured with dog-food and then roast the breasts only (little meat anywhere else) over a fire. I have eaten prairie oysters, moose-nose soup and a Filipino dish made of fermented pigs blood. Hmmm starting to get hungry now lol.

2
792634a784ec6a636c3137d0903e11b4

(1196)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Yeah, this is where 'eating like my ancestors' and I come to a parting of the ways. My Maori ancestors would have eaten a thing called a huhu grub - looks like an overgrown maggot and wiggles like one, too. Apparently has a high protein value, but eeeeuw. Fish, definitely a big part of paleo food in this part of the world - lots of my friends still go diving for their dinner!

792634a784ec6a636c3137d0903e11b4

(1196)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:14 AM

Lol, not even the cheese would do it for me!! Google it, you'll see what I mean! There are some awesome traditional food festivals here, where it's still served . . .

Fe29f6658ce67c1ecc4a22e960be7498

(2997)

on June 19, 2011
at 03:01 AM

I figure kefir counts for the 'little wriggly creatures' part of my diet. I'm sure the bacteria would look absolutely chillingly disgusting - but are too small to see (their loss my gain)!

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on June 19, 2011
at 01:54 AM

I've been pulling out grass and weeds from my freshly tilled garden, and if they look anything like root grubs... no way... well... unless they're first called something else and smothered with cheese and I'm told over and over again for years that it's popular in France... :p

1
0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on June 19, 2011
at 07:12 AM

Until the middle of the 20th century that was a popular dish in Germany and France: Soup made from cockchafer / may bugs.

Then the may bugs were fought with insecticides and are now rather rare - and today nobody would eat this soup any more...

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maik%C3%A4fersuppe

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on June 19, 2011
at 07:02 AM

Here in the UK a lot of shell fish are eaten - oysters, mussels, winkles, cockles - but I draw the lone at Whelks! (They are like giant snails and are very very rubbery. Yuk!) Crabs, oysters, prawns, shrimps, fresh water crayfish. They are all delicious and full of nutrients.

I'm quite sure our ancestors would have seen birds eating snails and worms and eaten them too but I don't think I could. And anyway, modern agriculture has almost made the worm an endangered species - if humans started using them as a food source, that would be the end of farming!

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