1

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Can you eat paleo without believing in evolution?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 20, 2011 at 8:18 PM

40% of Americans Do Not Believe in Evolution

I imagine a large percentage of these people who believe man was created in his present form 10,000 years ago (which also means they disagree with such theories as continental drift, theories explaining the age of rocks and fossils, etc) are in the elderly age and suffering from diseases of civilization. Is there any way to get through to them with the Paleo diet to improve their health? In other words, can we convince people to take on the paleolithic diet even if they do not believe in the paleolithic period?

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on August 20, 2011
at 08:45 PM

woo-friendly! I love it.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 20, 2011
at 08:41 PM

or post it on reddit paleo http://www.reddit.com/r/paleo

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 20, 2011
at 08:41 PM

Bryan, I would have to delete it without rephrasing it. You have to ask a question to post something on paleohacks. If you merely wish to share an article, you should start a Twitter, Facebook fan page, or a Blog.

3a966a805e09d88b0f223f2985392e4f

(836)

on August 20, 2011
at 08:30 PM

The Quilt, I did not pose that question.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on August 20, 2011
at 08:22 PM

Of course......

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 20, 2011
at 08:20 PM

I changed the title to make it a question.

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4 Answers

4
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 20, 2011
at 08:23 PM

I have some relatives in a certain part of the country who aren't very educated about science. I got them to eat better by telling them they should eat food as "God intended" and that modern humans were messing up God's food. As for bread in the Bible I told them that this bread was different and that if they wanted to make it they would have to grind their own grain and ferment it. How many people actually want to do that? But no, they are not paleo dieters and I didn't bother to send them paleo books. I sent them Wise Traditions from WAPF, which is woo-friendly.

2c8c421cf0e0c462654c7dc37f8b9711

(2729)

on August 20, 2011
at 08:45 PM

woo-friendly! I love it.

3
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on August 20, 2011
at 08:39 PM

Most creationists still believe in genetic mutation and microevolution. We have bred all sorts organisms like weiner dogs from wolves and cauliflower out of something that doesn't look like cauliflower. We have observed bacteria mutating to make use of a new source of food that they couldn't have previously, the result being a population explosion. Nobody except for the super insane are denying that the genome can change, what most dispute is whether that change can produce humans out of australopithecus. Apparently you can get a weiner dog from a wolf because they are the same type of essential entity (this is the position of biological essentialism), but you can't get a human from a chimp-like thingy, because humans are unique and not the same kind of essential entity. As much as I disagree with that it doesn't contradict the notion of adaptation, and it is a way to use the evolutionary argument in creationist-friendly guise.

Whether or not you should use the evolutionary argument at all is another topic.

Melissa's answer is probably the best route. Just say that processed crap is not how god intended humans to eat, clearly, since it destroys the body. Grains are going to be debatable, but they should be able to put two and two together and discern that if god designed people and processed junk harms people, then god didn't intend people to eat processed junk.

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 20, 2011
at 08:55 PM

I think even religious folk who don't necessarily believe in evolution or in the time frames of the paleolithic era can certainly eat a Paleo diet.

I eat a "Paleo" diet because from all the science I've read about what foods are optimal, it points me in that direction. Then modifications can be made that might fall outside of what one might consider to be from the paleolithic period >> foods such as domestically grown beef or milk from a cow fed on a grass pasture or coconut oil.

If we were so rigid to believe that only foods from the paleo period can be consumed for all of eternity, then that would leave no room for new foods.

Let's say there were only 11 cows on earth during the paleolithic period (obviously I'm being ridiculous, but follow me for a sec). And man got his nourishment from other animals that had already populated more abundantly. Then over the next several thousand years, cows multiplied in population to over 3 million, and man started to eat cows because of the availability. Should we assume that because cows weren't around in the beginning, that they should never be eaten because they did not largely sustain man through the 'paleolithic' period?

In 200 years from now, there may be a new food to nourish mankind with. The same openness should apply.

If a certain food is biologically appropriate for a human to eat, and in eating that certain food, you personally find that it nourishes you well and keeps you healthy, then it should be considered ok to include in your "Paleo" diet.

I believe that line of thinking can apply to all humans, regardless of spiritual orientation.

1
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on August 20, 2011
at 08:40 PM

This is the one issue I have with the paleo name. I fear that many are not open to its message of good health because of the name and what it stands for. This is where I think "ancestral" wins out. Everyone can acknowledge having ancestors while some simply cannot acknowledge evolution for whatever reason.

I must admit I am absolutely fascinated by the hackers who are creationists yet follow a diet based on evolution. Admittedly I don't understand their belief system and fully embrace evolution as the truth but I would love to hear more from them about how make peace with the two opposing thoughts. I hope they will chime in (and not feel or be attacked) I think understanding their perspective is important for us as a community if we wish to grow and reach everyone with the message of good health no matter where they are and/or what they believe .

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