8

votes

How do you respond to "everything in moderation"?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 25, 2011 at 12:25 PM

When I'm explaining my dietary choices in following paleo (only when solicited), I have found that people's default, when they decide it's too hard to not eat bread (duh), is "well.....everything in moderation." They shrug, the conversation ends, and they walk away feeling like well-balanced individuals......while I'm the healthy one. :)

What can I say to them that will not be nasty or snarky, but will challenge them? I want to get people to think more about what they put into their bodies, or even to come back later for more discussion. The last thing I want to do is turn them off by acting like a snotty, know-it-all a-hole.

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on November 11, 2013
at 07:46 AM

One of my srtudents taught me "Perfect practice makes perfect, imperfect practice makes imperfect" .

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on November 11, 2013
at 05:46 AM

Saying I'm familiar with is:

Moderation in all things.

Which (imo) sends a different message than "everything in moderation"

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on March 12, 2012
at 12:12 PM

This is how I usually finish that sentence. I try to avoid going on tirades these days about how "blah blah, moderation is why people are fat, blah blah" but I decided I'd rather be witty than be met with a blank stare.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 12, 2012
at 10:59 AM

Wow, Nance. You're paleo and your son not at all? Usually it's the young people that get paleo because they have the internet and are more open-minded. You must have a young mind :)

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on October 28, 2011
at 12:05 AM

Nance - How old is your grandson and how much wheat is he eating per day? Who's to say he won't have issues later on in life (that's what happened to my husband) - though I hope for his sake he doesn't. He has some of your genes. My maternal grandmother and aunt had ulcerative colitis and avoided wheat because it made it worse. I avoid it too. What exactly is tons of fruit? 5 servings a day? 10 servings a day? High fructose fruit or low fructose fruit? I agree some people are more gluten sensitive vs. fructose sensitive - always individual differences.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on October 28, 2011
at 12:00 AM

Mallory - A person can looks good and have inflammation and aging inside. When you are young most people can tolerate junk food and still look fine! But try it when you are older (depending on the person - 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 ... unless you have spectacular genes. There are athletes getting autoimmune disease or have latent inflammation. I'd like to see CRP, A1C, triglycerides, HDL and other numbers in athletes - they may not publicly admit it. Some marathoners carb load and then die of heart attacks later on.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on October 26, 2011
at 03:44 PM

Edward, thanks for posting this answer. I, too, find that the "everything in moderation" comment is used by those who use any saying they can think of to continue some kind of indulgence which is unhealthy, dangerous, or unkind, etc.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 26, 2011
at 12:30 PM

I've got that one on hold for me at the library! Can't wait to pick it up.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on October 26, 2011
at 11:59 AM

True, Ruth. I didn't vote to close, just wanted to point to it. Perhaps I should have said "closely related", rather than "nearly exact".

2503e1b1cef16861e40678ad789bcba2

(113)

on October 26, 2011
at 07:10 AM

Damn straight! :)

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:57 PM

Do people apply the "it's unhealthy not to cheat once in a while" logic to *anything* else? "It's not a healthy marriage unless you fool around on the side once in a while." "Alcoholics should have a drink once in a while to stay sane." "You're just not living if you don't occasionally shoplift."

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:43 PM

The fallacy in your statement is the assumption that everyone will have said sickness in moderation. I can eat tons of fruit, and even moderate honey/sugar, with perfectly normal blood sugar response. Wheat makes me sick from end to end but doesn't bother my grandson at all.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:41 PM

Part of the process may be learning what your "safe cheats" are. I was surprised to find that wheat and dairy (except butter and cream) have immediate, really negative effects but something with sugar but no other neolithic ingredients is pretty benign. I'm also pretty comfortable with occasional legumes.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:39 PM

I wouldn't recommend going the "your healthiness is an illusion" route unless you're looking for a fight. Talk about Lascaux and hunt-and-gather. Nice things you can agree on.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:38 PM

Whew! I feel drastically better within 48 hours, so while I understand I may still be healing at some level at least I'm not sick the whole time.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:37 PM

I've had the same results. My son complains about his digestive issues and then defends his wheat and soy to the max. All I can do is love him as he is.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:34 PM

Is a Malnati deep dish meat crust pizza paleo?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:33 PM

Actually, Mark Twain said those exact words. It's one of his notable quotes and I like to see him get the credit.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:31 PM

So if you were a paleo elephant, this means no more peanuts? Think about it the next time you go to the zoo.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:11 PM

that's what I say!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:54 PM

This is largely because folks, when they do alter their diet, don't feel any different. I think the assumption is that paleo is just another diet that doesn't produce meaningful results. The magic, though, is that half-assed paleo ("paleo in moderation"?) can produce huge results.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:33 PM

It only occurs in very minute amounts in nature. I really don't think anyone was confused by what I was suggesting here.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:23 PM

NOT WORTH TRYING TO REPLICATE 'PALEO' HAHA eat the real thing or GTFO in my opinion

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:21 PM

@ thhq -- I don't think I wear it on my sleeve. as I said, I only go into this stuff when asked about it. @ Ambimorph -- I did see that question before posting this, but as I said, I don't want to be flippant about it, but more polite, engaging, and intriguing.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 25, 2011
at 08:41 PM

You often hear this when people are getting smashed on the weekend.

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 25, 2011
at 07:53 PM

"...results in a life of moderation"

A71dfbf4e7efeb2068b63df478e9ac46

on October 25, 2011
at 07:34 PM

There are natural, healthy transfats...

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 25, 2011
at 07:15 PM

lol...............

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on October 25, 2011
at 06:58 PM

Nearly exact duplicate here: http://paleohacks.com/questions/63990/what-are-the-best-smarmy-flippant-or-humorous-retorts-to-nonsense-sound-bites/64046#64046

Medium avatar

(39821)

on October 25, 2011
at 05:55 PM

Damn, now I'm thinking about delicious grilled cheese.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on October 25, 2011
at 05:39 PM

ehhh it works for tons of people. look at ripped bodybuilders moderately eating oatmeal, grits, bread etc...theyre fine

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:09 PM

Who says you're the healthy one? Saying "everything in moderation" is a polite way to walk away from someone who wears it on their sleeve.

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:01 PM

That response has never worked for me. I have a few people in my life that live by the before mentioned motto. When I give an answer like that, they then assume I am being overdramatic, missing their point, and dismiss my response outright.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Glither, I had forgotten about that :P

Medium avatar

(3029)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:36 PM

I love that my stupidity is being referenced! I did not eat cyanide in vain.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:26 PM

Cynicism in moderation as well :)

5139b8189a2286f2f69425128ccb764c

(220)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:59 PM

I agree with this 100%! Most people aren't interested in being converted, especially when it comes to changing a long cherished (and maybe even unconscious) pardigm. If and when someone is ready to change, they know where to find you, otherwise, you're wasting your time and theirs.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:32 PM

Sure, I don't ever claim to be 100% strict, but my goal is to get people to really appreciate the HUGE effect of what they consume on health & all health problems. For some reason, some people just don't even consider that what they eat may cause or cure their multitude of issues.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:30 PM

Just remember there is no good or bad food. If there was the food industry might me annoyed...

C678bf33580271beecf36ab23424c3bb

(100)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:26 PM

That was going to be my comment. How much is a moderate amount of cyanide? Cyanide is obviously a poison. It's possible to argue that wheat is a poison or at least a toxin. How much of that toxin, then, is moderate? Why would you choose to consume any of a toxin?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Cyanide in moderation.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:06 PM

I should also add that I end the conversation after proving "everything in moderation" false. People need time to digest what you are telling them. Plowing right back into way paleo is better than the way they are eating will likely backfire. They'll ask when they are ready for more information.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:00 PM

you're right, the fact that gluten stays in the system for SO long is a good point to make. but, of course, that means also that people have to first go thru something like a Whole30 before even recognizing that gluten has a negative effect on their bodies.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 25, 2011
at 12:52 PM

This is a tough one for me because I think the truth is that for many people that rule works just fine. If one is fit, feels good, not sick, etc and eats everything in moderation then leave them be. People live long, good lives with grains for sure. If the person, OTOH, is sickly, fat, etc then you can just tell them that grains, legumes, and dairy aren't helping them

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28 Answers

17
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:11 PM

"Everything in moderation!"

"Tell that to an elephant or a lion."

"What do you mean?"

"Well, they don't eat everything in moderation."

"No, that's because they are obligate herbivores or carnivores. We are omnivores, we can eat everything"

"Oh, so grass in moderation is ok?"

"Well, you know what I mean, not 'everything'."

"No, I don't know what you mean. Why is it ok for an elelphant to eat leaves, and not for us?"

"Uhh?"

"Elephants evolved by natural selection for a certain lifestyle, just like we did. And grains are not part of our evolutionary history, just as tree-leaves are not, and grass is not."

...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:31 PM

So if you were a paleo elephant, this means no more peanuts? Think about it the next time you go to the zoo.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:30 PM

Just remember there is no good or bad food. If there was the food industry might me annoyed...

Medium avatar

(3029)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:36 PM

I love that my stupidity is being referenced! I did not eat cyanide in vain.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Cyanide in moderation.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:26 PM

Cynicism in moderation as well :)

C678bf33580271beecf36ab23424c3bb

(100)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:26 PM

That was going to be my comment. How much is a moderate amount of cyanide? Cyanide is obviously a poison. It's possible to argue that wheat is a poison or at least a toxin. How much of that toxin, then, is moderate? Why would you choose to consume any of a toxin?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Glither, I had forgotten about that :P

12
30168d0c286d6cbaccd3f638ccd405a1

on October 25, 2011
at 01:27 PM

As I always say: "Everything in moderation; including moderation..."

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:11 PM

that's what I say!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:33 PM

Actually, Mark Twain said those exact words. It's one of his notable quotes and I like to see him get the credit.

2503e1b1cef16861e40678ad789bcba2

(113)

on October 26, 2011
at 07:10 AM

Damn straight! :)

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on March 12, 2012
at 12:12 PM

This is how I usually finish that sentence. I try to avoid going on tirades these days about how "blah blah, moderation is why people are fat, blah blah" but I decided I'd rather be witty than be met with a blank stare.

5
7cab5a1f1fd48c3cc4938ab824fdb52e

on October 25, 2011
at 12:50 PM

I was talking with my father in law the other day and he can't grasp the idea of a lifestyle diet, he can only associate food choice with weight loss. Anyway, I told him about how I made a Meatza, and he asked why we would trouble with that when we can just have tiny pizzas made on tortillas. I explained we don't eat tortillas, he said well if it is a lifestyle choice, you can cheat with a little tortilla 3-4 times a month.

I put my hand to my head, and said it is a lifestyle choice not to make my body feel like crap. He responded you have to cheat occasionally otherwise it is just not healthy.

Hand went back to head and I said, ok but if and when I cheat, I make it worth it. It is going to be a heaping plate of pancakes, or something else ridiculous, maybe once every 3-4 months, not frequent tortillas.

His Reply: "Well thats not going to help you lose weight."

I gave up.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:34 PM

Is a Malnati deep dish meat crust pizza paleo?

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:57 PM

Do people apply the "it's unhealthy not to cheat once in a while" logic to *anything* else? "It's not a healthy marriage unless you fool around on the side once in a while." "Alcoholics should have a drink once in a while to stay sane." "You're just not living if you don't occasionally shoplift."

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 25, 2011
at 07:15 PM

lol...............

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:13 PM

You're going to get people to throw "moderation" in your face when you follow rigid, dogmatic paleo principles. But the reality of the matter is that the majority of paleo benefits result from the very minimal initial efforts. The vast majority of people are concerned about getting the most "bang for your buck". The vast majority people are never going to be as dialed in as your average PaleoHacks user.

Honestly, ask yourself: why not paleo "in moderation"? (Yes, of course, there are reasons to be strict with paleo, but the overwelming majority has little need to be as strict as most of us are.)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:41 PM

Part of the process may be learning what your "safe cheats" are. I was surprised to find that wheat and dairy (except butter and cream) have immediate, really negative effects but something with sugar but no other neolithic ingredients is pretty benign. I'm also pretty comfortable with occasional legumes.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:32 PM

Sure, I don't ever claim to be 100% strict, but my goal is to get people to really appreciate the HUGE effect of what they consume on health & all health problems. For some reason, some people just don't even consider that what they eat may cause or cure their multitude of issues.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:54 PM

This is largely because folks, when they do alter their diet, don't feel any different. I think the assumption is that paleo is just another diet that doesn't produce meaningful results. The magic, though, is that half-assed paleo ("paleo in moderation"?) can produce huge results.

3
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on October 25, 2011
at 03:01 PM

People will never ever change until they're ready to change. You can scream and shout until you're blue in the face, but you can't. Make. People. Change.

What you can do is be honest and open about the choices you've made and then hope they come to you when they're ready. For me, the answer to "everything in moderation" is "some things in moderation." Now that I've lost 63 pounds (OK, 6-1/2 of that was baby), I will sometimes eat cheese or even a little high quality ice cream. But other things I'm happy to never touch ever again (beer, for example) because I know it'll make me feel like crap. I tell people that. And then, when they're ready, they ask me more.

I've also had to come to terms with the fact that some people, like my mom, will probably never be ready. It drives me crazy. I still offer the occasional piece of advice, but I just drop it in an email and walk away. It's not my job to change her life.

3
69a2a5deb24d5b8d3aae3d9652fac564

(1020)

on October 25, 2011
at 02:21 PM

I usually respond:

Yes, EVERYTHING in "moderation" (put up air quotes when you say the word "Moderation").

...including cigarettes and heroin...

then I repeat it: "Everything in "moderation!" (air quotes again)

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 25, 2011
at 04:01 PM

That response has never worked for me. I have a few people in my life that live by the before mentioned motto. When I give an answer like that, they then assume I am being overdramatic, missing their point, and dismiss my response outright.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:37 PM

I've had the same results. My son complains about his digestive issues and then defends his wheat and soy to the max. All I can do is love him as he is.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 12, 2012
at 10:59 AM

Wow, Nance. You're paleo and your son not at all? Usually it's the young people that get paleo because they have the internet and are more open-minded. You must have a young mind :)

3
5139b8189a2286f2f69425128ccb764c

on October 25, 2011
at 02:02 PM

Ruth, in my opinion, many people want to stay in the dark. When I was a CCU nurse, I can't tell you how many people I saw who were deathly ill, maxed out on every single medication possible, but would not even consider changing their habits. I asked one of my patients about this (he was waiting on the heart transplant list), and he said to me, "Why should I do that. That's what the medicine is for." No lie.

3
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:03 PM

If it is a conversation worth continuing (sometimes it's just better to walk away), I usually point out that there are some things that shouldn't be consumed by anyone at any time in any amount. Transfats being one of those things. Most people who are even marginally interested in nutrition are aware that transfats are bad. Full stop. Even the U.S. government (who seems to find a way to defend every processed food), doesn't have a safe level of consumption for transfats because no one should be eating them. Ever.

I realize tranfats have nothing to do with the bread you were discussing, but it does prove their comfortable excuse false and forces them to examine what they really believe instead of just spouting out a trite saying.

It's not likely to cause an immediate conversion to paleo, but it is a small crack in the SAD shell they are living in and once that crack forms it's a lot easier to get new information inside. After all, how many of us went straight overnight from a full-on SAD diet of McDonalds and Banquet frozen dinners to a full-on paleo diet of all local grass-fed/pastured meats and local organic vegetables? It usually happens over time with smaller changes; crack the shell and the small changes will start to happen.

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:06 PM

I should also add that I end the conversation after proving "everything in moderation" false. People need time to digest what you are telling them. Plowing right back into way paleo is better than the way they are eating will likely backfire. They'll ask when they are ready for more information.

A71dfbf4e7efeb2068b63df478e9ac46

on October 25, 2011
at 07:34 PM

There are natural, healthy transfats...

13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:33 PM

It only occurs in very minute amounts in nature. I really don't think anyone was confused by what I was suggesting here.

2
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 25, 2011
at 08:40 PM

Everything in moderation. Except most people who claim "everything in moderation" use it to justify a "habit" they don't do in moderation.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 25, 2011
at 08:41 PM

You often hear this when people are getting smashed on the weekend.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on October 26, 2011
at 03:44 PM

Edward, thanks for posting this answer. I, too, find that the "everything in moderation" comment is used by those who use any saying they can think of to continue some kind of indulgence which is unhealthy, dangerous, or unkind, etc.

2
B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10255)

on October 25, 2011
at 08:15 PM

".....results in a moderate life"

2
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on October 25, 2011
at 03:17 PM

Really - you want sickness in moderation, too??!! You want pre/diabetes, obesity, arthritis, osteoporosis, and heartburn in moderation, and all those diseases mentioned on the drug commercials too!

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on October 25, 2011
at 05:39 PM

ehhh it works for tons of people. look at ripped bodybuilders moderately eating oatmeal, grits, bread etc...theyre fine

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:43 PM

The fallacy in your statement is the assumption that everyone will have said sickness in moderation. I can eat tons of fruit, and even moderate honey/sugar, with perfectly normal blood sugar response. Wheat makes me sick from end to end but doesn't bother my grandson at all.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on October 28, 2011
at 12:00 AM

Mallory - A person can looks good and have inflammation and aging inside. When you are young most people can tolerate junk food and still look fine! But try it when you are older (depending on the person - 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 ... unless you have spectacular genes. There are athletes getting autoimmune disease or have latent inflammation. I'd like to see CRP, A1C, triglycerides, HDL and other numbers in athletes - they may not publicly admit it. Some marathoners carb load and then die of heart attacks later on.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on October 28, 2011
at 12:05 AM

Nance - How old is your grandson and how much wheat is he eating per day? Who's to say he won't have issues later on in life (that's what happened to my husband) - though I hope for his sake he doesn't. He has some of your genes. My maternal grandmother and aunt had ulcerative colitis and avoided wheat because it made it worse. I avoid it too. What exactly is tons of fruit? 5 servings a day? 10 servings a day? High fructose fruit or low fructose fruit? I agree some people are more gluten sensitive vs. fructose sensitive - always individual differences.

1
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on October 26, 2011
at 12:15 AM

"Forgive him, for he believes that the customs of his tribe are the laws of nature." --George Bernard Shaw

1
1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:04 PM

When it comes to bread made from un-soaked, un-fermented, genetically-modified wheat, I think "moderation" should be something less than the central focus that it currently enjoys in the SAD.

0
Medium avatar

on January 05, 2014
at 03:21 PM

This is driving me crazy this morning with a conversation with my dad on how I don't eat the giant box of wheat squares anymore. I told him grains make me dizzy and give me massive brain fog and he says " It is all in your head, everything in moderation..." God I hate that line!

0
Medium avatar

on November 11, 2013
at 07:30 AM

When I went paleo in order to prevent diabetes type 2 since I'm insulin resistant people felt sorry for me for not being able to eat sweets and bread. I replied that it's my choice and noone would feel sorry for a drug addict when quitting drugs. That seems to give them a new perspective.

0
3fc95bca9e723edfbbb72b172798ab49

(1354)

on November 11, 2013
at 03:49 AM

There are a number of these types of "truisms" for which I have much preferred versions.

"Practice makes perfect" is replaced by "Practice makes permanent".

"Everything in moderation" is replaced "Everything in context".

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on November 11, 2013
at 07:46 AM

One of my srtudents taught me "Perfect practice makes perfect, imperfect practice makes imperfect" .

0
A048b66e08306d405986b6c04bf5e8e4

on November 11, 2013
at 02:49 AM

"I'm more into the all or nothing approach"

0
A3db46eeb92ff43246ba05aace88bc5a

on November 10, 2013
at 03:34 AM

I hate this one. My dad loves to throw this one out there whenever anyone talks about... well, pretty much anything.

I used to try and explain the stupidity of moderation kinda like:

"Moderation, especially in regards to diet, is for people who are too stupid or lazy to learn about what's good for them. They figure that their dietary trespasses are OK because they never indulge to excess. They lack the motivation to do otherwise. But a life of consistent 'moderation' still has a cumulative effect. A small spark might not ignite the hay stack today, but if you keep throwing off sparks with consistency, well..."

But these days it's more like:

"Enjoy your heart-healthy whole grainz, brah." And then I have myself a giggle. Can't bring myself to talk about health-related matters too much anymore. The cognitive dissonance/sheer ignorance of most people just sickens me.

0
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on November 10, 2013
at 01:52 AM

"...If you want to be moderately healthy. I'm shooting for optimal"

0
174e95f0db64af68196a6c07b5f7bc47

on November 10, 2013
at 01:20 AM

I used to say things like "Even rat poison and cocaine in moderation?" But then people just think it's hilarious that you're calling wheat "poison" or soda "cocaine", and the conversation gets misdirected.

Now I just explain how good I feel when I eat certain foods, how badly my body reacts when I eat other foods, and emphasize that I personally don't like suffering the consequences of eating those other foods-- even suffering the consequences in moderation.

(It remains surreal to me when, after I tell someone that eating certain things give me painful stomach cramps, diarrhea, and downward mood swings, they continue to refer to those things as a "treat" I'm "depriving" myself of. What the hell kind of treat is this? Besides, even old "treats" don't taste good to me when I'm eating real food most of the time-- they're too-sweet, or cardboard-y, or chemical-y. It's literally unpleasant for me in every way to "indulge" in these "treats", so there's no reason for their re-introduction (even in small amounts) in the first place.)

I would ask them as a question (because then they have to think about it): why would someone want to introduce into their diet, even in moderation, foods that don't taste good to them and which cause them immediate unpleasantness and long-term inflammation and sickness?

0
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 12, 2012
at 12:11 PM

Paleo comes closest to moderation as far as I know. Isn't everyone's goal here to have perfect blood tests, or, in other words, to have balanced (= moderate) levels of minerals, hormones, cholesterol, ...?

0
A0cc1bfd57d2a52a7468f8a06e930bbc

on October 26, 2011
at 10:08 AM

If it's a friend, I've found the way to deal with the problem is to give them a copy of the book "Wheat Belly" by Dr. William Davis. Several friends have put wheat out after reading the book. After one reads it I pass it along to someone else. It works.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 26, 2011
at 12:30 PM

I've got that one on hold for me at the library! Can't wait to pick it up.

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on October 26, 2011
at 02:08 AM

"Everything in moderation" is a code-phrase for "whatever", only meaning that your friend is either too nice or too passive-aggressive to tell you how they really feel. When you hear this phrase, it is your signal to say that you agree and then let it drop.

0
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on October 26, 2011
at 01:59 AM

I ate moderately for years. And now, for me, the level of moderation that works is pretty extreme. But the migraines are gone. The meds didn't work, so diet was my only option.

0
9c287a922945c5680b48b0610a33f67e

on October 25, 2011
at 11:24 PM

"Everything in moderation, ESPECIALLY moderation!" I believe I first heard David Wolfe (raw food guy) say that. It's definitely true.

0
C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

on October 25, 2011
at 05:41 PM

i like grilled cheese... but im not having it everyday. thats not moderate. doesnt mean ill never have it again in my life...

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on October 25, 2011
at 09:23 PM

NOT WORTH TRYING TO REPLICATE 'PALEO' HAHA eat the real thing or GTFO in my opinion

Medium avatar

(39821)

on October 25, 2011
at 05:55 PM

Damn, now I'm thinking about delicious grilled cheese.

0
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on October 25, 2011
at 12:59 PM

How about "As you like it. To each his own."

IMHO there's no need to overdo it in the "challenging them" department. He/she is likely to store the info deep down in his/her brain somewhere. How/when/why they use it or follow up on it is up to them. Your job is done once you've explained why you eat the way you do. Then you just gotta let it go ... and serve as a relaxed, fit, healthy, cool example. Actions (adn health) speak louder than words.

5139b8189a2286f2f69425128ccb764c

(220)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:59 PM

I agree with this 100%! Most people aren't interested in being converted, especially when it comes to changing a long cherished (and maybe even unconscious) pardigm. If and when someone is ready to change, they know where to find you, otherwise, you're wasting your time and theirs.

0
F009a38e075dc8b2cd76e849eb505063

on October 25, 2011
at 12:42 PM

It's my opinion that people will learn just from being around you and seeing your choices. Our diet choice, like any of our choices, is ours to make. In Robb Wolf's Paleo book, he says something like most of us can't handle grains/gluten. Some people don't know they're sick. And when they do get sick, they can't handle gluten. (Something like that.) So maybe you could arm yourself with more information for when the time comes. Also his book says we only need to eat gluten every 15 days for it to continue to aggravate our system. So much for moderation! Since I read that I've been being more strict and not having the occasional beer or wheat item.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:39 PM

I wouldn't recommend going the "your healthiness is an illusion" route unless you're looking for a fight. Talk about Lascaux and hunt-and-gather. Nice things you can agree on.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on October 25, 2011
at 01:00 PM

you're right, the fact that gluten stays in the system for SO long is a good point to make. but, of course, that means also that people have to first go thru something like a Whole30 before even recognizing that gluten has a negative effect on their bodies.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 25, 2011
at 11:38 PM

Whew! I feel drastically better within 48 hours, so while I understand I may still be healing at some level at least I'm not sick the whole time.

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