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Looking to expand our palates and try new ethnic cuisine. What have you found to be the most paleo friendly?

Answered on February 03, 2014
Created February 02, 2014 at 7:06 AM

When I try and reserach online I can only seem to find what SAD considers healthy. You know "omg avoid all that fat". Hubby and I enjoy spicy food and strong flavors. We have exhausted mexican food and we want to try some new things. It does not have to be perfectly paleo but absolutely no gluten (allergy). We just want real food. Any recommendations will be appreciated.

10ec51c0e6e41939215a55316ad3d0b7

(40)

on February 03, 2014
at 02:33 PM

Yes, Japanese and Korean--well heck most Asian--cuisines use lots of broth and parts of animals, fermented foods, seaweed, and gluten free starches.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2014
at 10:00 PM

Japanese brings to mind Korean barbecue, which is pretty darn close to cavemen cooking on the hearth. The first time I ever had it was in Japan, and it's a lot more popular there than in the USA.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 02, 2014
at 04:45 PM

Maybe it's just the cruddy Indian buffets in my area, but there's nothing there remotely paleo. If I go, it's a total cheat and then I don't bother trying to keep paleo.

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7 Answers

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Medium avatar

on February 03, 2014
at 10:11 PM

CURRY CURRY CURRY - All day long, lots of variations can be done.

Thai food can be pretty encouraging with paleo for sure.

I am partial to those flavors though but also Califlower Hummus is a good ethnic option.

Also Italian - meatza, spagetti squash etc

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6dbb0a29323601a195389eb33ce9cb7d

on February 03, 2014
at 12:29 AM

Filipino cuisine has become a favorite of mine. Lots of creative offal recipes + seemingly weird combinations of ingredients that always seem to turn out amazing...All manner of meats/seafood... coconut is used extensively, as are gluten free starches (rice, potato, taro, plantains... not sure how you feel about these though). Substitutions should be made for the cooking oils used though, and possibly soy sauce (unless you're like me and don't mind a bit of naturally fermented soy here and there).

Another thing to note is that most of the vegetables used are very easily sourced, as compared to those used in other SE Asian cuisines (haven't we all been there? "Boy I could really go for some asam laksa.....ahhh shit I can't find half these ingredients!!).

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Medium avatar

(154)

on February 02, 2014
at 09:20 PM

I'm Lebanese, so of course I have to make a plug for it. Lots of grilled foods, olive oil. While there is the ubiquitous amount of bread and hummus floating around, you can still make friends with middle eastern foods. But I think the secret to all alternatives: spices. Make friends with them.

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Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2014
at 07:44 PM

South American! Lots of grilled meat in Brazilian/Venezuelan/Colombian/Argentine cuisines. If you allow solanaceae, there's a wealth of pepper/tomato/potato dishes.

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56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on February 02, 2014
at 05:15 PM

Japanese, of course. 24 hrs broths, brassica, roots, raw fish, fish eggs, raw liver, raw yolks, seaweed, mushrooms, natto and rice. There are a number of Euro regional cuisines too. In SW France, liver pate', headcheese, everything bacon wrapped, potatoes cooked in goose fat, marrow, goat and sheep cheese, melons. In Tuscany, whole chickens, T-bone steaks, and anything wild boar, all grilled, pinzimonio. In Sardinia, whole piglets, whole lambs, offal kebabs, goat and sheep cheese, cheese with fly larvae, everything wild boar, wild greens from the mountains. In all these places, lard and olive oil.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 02, 2014
at 10:00 PM

Japanese brings to mind Korean barbecue, which is pretty darn close to cavemen cooking on the hearth. The first time I ever had it was in Japan, and it's a lot more popular there than in the USA.

10ec51c0e6e41939215a55316ad3d0b7

(40)

on February 03, 2014
at 02:33 PM

Yes, Japanese and Korean--well heck most Asian--cuisines use lots of broth and parts of animals, fermented foods, seaweed, and gluten free starches.

0
52c9752a7944acc73f13db48fef20517

on February 02, 2014
at 04:34 PM

I will put in a nod for indian food.

Granted, naan, samosas, anything with chickpeas, are all no-gos

BUT i went to an indian restaurant first time worried about what i could eat. They had a buffet and i could eat more than half the dishes offered. If you can handle rice or allow peas (which i dont) the options improve there too. I remember the tandoori chicken was my jam and they had a ginger cauliflower dish and a chicken/peppers/onions deal (cant remember their names) but they were awesome as well. No curries were offered. But on par it seems like those indians put out a pretty good balance of meat n veggies. One of the best meals ive ever had. Certainly, better than that elephant in the room general tsos at the chinese buffet.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 02, 2014
at 04:45 PM

Maybe it's just the cruddy Indian buffets in my area, but there's nothing there remotely paleo. If I go, it's a total cheat and then I don't bother trying to keep paleo.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 02, 2014
at 02:54 PM

With a little kitchen knowledge, every cuisine is paleo friendly. I'm myself find that Thai, French, and Mexican are my to-go cuisines. Thai is great, if you can do rice (and rice noodles). Substituting caulirice and zoodles works, but it's not as good as the real thing. Otherwise it's a lot of veggies. French is classic. Making it gluten-free is rather straightforward, then it's all animal fat and veggies. Mexican… think beyond burritos and TexMex. If you can do rice, beans or corn, options are wide open. Corn tortillas are so much better than flour tortillas anyway!

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