3

votes

Sweet potato as energy source - speed and timing

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 05, 2011 at 9:59 PM

Hi, Just wondering if anyone has done any research or studies into the speed at which sweet potato is uptaken by the body and made available for use as an energy source. I am thinking in terms of a practical application, as a fairly low carbing crossfitter, when the best time (in terms of hours prior) to pre workout is to consume the starchy carb to aid fuelling the more glycotic pathway type workouts/wod's.

Thanks, Liam

E9959727c25c191ea9c4b614c012325d

on October 20, 2011
at 06:11 AM

will let you know, playing around with it at the moment. crossfitter/triathlete and have noticed somewhat of an improvement on the runs, will keep you posted

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on October 05, 2011
at 11:47 PM

You can take the sweet potato to the box with you and eat right after the workout or try to get the nutrition in you within 30 minutes post-WOD if you can for best results.

D7ec5ab98a0b971f9e24b4e654abfa7d

on October 05, 2011
at 10:53 PM

I've been wondering this same thing -- I'm new to paleo, doing fairly low-carb (trying to lose weight) and just started CF. I keep reading that you should eat a sweet potato (or similar starchy veg) "right after" working out... not sure about the timing/practicality of that

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5 Answers

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2
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on October 05, 2011
at 10:46 PM

For me, what works best is to have the sweet potatoes immediately post-WOD. You don't really need it pre-WOD because once you've gotten them converted to muscle glycogen, it'll stay there until you need it, so just replenish after the workout (when you're insulin is already up) and you'll be fine. Another benefit to not having them pre-WOD is that since they're starch, they will raise your insulin a bit, when your insulin is up, you have a much harder time pulling energy out of fat cells to be used, so if you're slightly hungry (not starving) and running on low insulin during the WOD you can both use your muscle glycogen and pull energy out of fat.

1
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on October 05, 2011
at 10:53 PM

it doesn't matter. pre-workout might enable you to push it harder due to higher liver glycogen.

1
31a40ab9ad75cb584866984658011750

on October 05, 2011
at 10:32 PM

My trainer has said its best to have post workout because your muscles need the sugar for repair..

0
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on October 06, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I would go with having the sweet potato post workout.

One additional point would be you might want to have a regular potato or possibly a yam as they have more starch, whereas sweet potatoes have been bread for sweetness and contain more fructose.

For more info see http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?p=1848

0
F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on October 06, 2011
at 12:50 PM

Hey Liam - good to see another Aussie on here!

My housemate is a runner & has been experimenting with this. He's been consuming pre-workout with great results. Very interested to hear what works for you...

E9959727c25c191ea9c4b614c012325d

on October 20, 2011
at 06:11 AM

will let you know, playing around with it at the moment. crossfitter/triathlete and have noticed somewhat of an improvement on the runs, will keep you posted

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