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PEAK ATP...? Total Marketing Hype or the Next Big Performance Supplement?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 05, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Just came across this supplement today while looking at a "Paleo" energy gel... I'm not that intersted in the energy gel itself (or whether it's Paleo or not), but rather the ingredient PEAK ATP. They market it as, "Peak ATP: Elevates APT levels to create more energy naturally".

On the PEAK ATP website they have a description describing it as, "Produced through a proprietary fermentation process, PEAK ATP delivers the exact molecule the human body needs to create energy. Extensive scientific evidence shows that PEAK ATP has a dramatic effect on circulation without adversely affecting heart rate or blood pressure. PEAK ATP has applications for energy, athletic performance and anti-aging".

They have a page of research studies showing it's benefits (I'm not sure all are done using this product specifically, or just ATP in general)... So, what do you guys think about using this supplement? Is this a way to fuel your muscles without creating the huge blood sugar spike when using typical gels? Does it require loading, like creatine?

Additionally: If anyone currently or in the past has used anything with ATP in it, you're first hand experience would be great to hear...

6a9c41a5ad20b7cc2239a1df412b63b2

(-2)

on March 11, 2013
at 07:16 PM

Power ATP's new website is www.poweratp. It will be up in a few weeks.

6a9c41a5ad20b7cc2239a1df412b63b2

(-2)

on December 18, 2012
at 08:15 PM

Yep, food, the Krebs Cycle works through and from 7 enzymes (proteins) which require specific substrates to enhance their activity and function properly. Without adequate substrate supply of all 7, the Krebs Cycle will not work at its maximum efficiency. Combine this with stress, lack of sleep, a daily diet short of nutrients, etc., maximum production of ATP will be deficient. The best product is Power ATP www.topatp.com. They have a money back guarantee, check it out. Because it works, it helps regulate blood sugar levels, the positive side effects are amazing. - Fred

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 07, 2012
at 06:18 AM

Yep, the product is called food.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on September 17, 2012
at 08:51 PM

Interesting, I might look into the sub-lingual...

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on September 11, 2012
at 05:04 PM

Sam, if intramuscular ATP were to increase 100% you would have one HELLUVA product on your hands regardless of the total 'tiny' amount. Thats like saying that 500ng/dl to 1000ng/dl of Testosterone is a 'tiny' amount.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 06, 2012
at 05:30 PM

I believe creatine is utilized in the phosphocreatine system to basically "recycle" ADP back into ATP... So yes, creatine definitely works, but the focus here is on oral ATP since I've noticed it creeping into a number of products lately.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on June 06, 2012
at 01:46 PM

Doesn't creatine, which is well known to work, and is dirt cheap, do the same kind of thing, which is to provide extra ATP so that you can work out a little bit longer than usual?

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 06, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Good to know... The more I read about creatine, the more I think I really should be supplementing it as part of my lifting program.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on June 05, 2012
at 11:35 PM

@jjtitus: The thing is that the amounts of ATP actually stored in muscles cells is tiny. Even if they were doubled, it would still be a very small amount. Especially if oral ATP is broken down to muscle ATP building blocks, you'd have to wonder if oral ATP is better than just supplementing creatine, for example.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:44 PM

It should also be noted that the authors do not address chronic loading (I don't know why, seems like it's a logical alternative to acute dosing), where Jordan et al. saw an increase in training volume after 14 days of continuous oral ATP administration... maybe the biggest benefit is with chronic loading to increase volume, possibly decrease recovery time (train harder, build additional muscle)?

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:27 PM

Nice link, I guess even with elevated liver/red blood cell/blood plasma levels of ATP its not quite the same as ATP stored in the muscle itself... and it appears that with regards to ATP, rat/mice studies do not correlate with human studies.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:05 PM

Cont. "In sum, exogenously administered ATP elevates liver ATP pools, which in turn yields elevated red blood cell ATP pools. Subsequently, the expanded red blood cell ATP pools are slowly released into the blood plasma (extracellular). Animal and human studies have both conclusively shown that oral administration of ATP elevates ATP levels in liver, red blood cells and blood plasma."

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:05 PM

Hmmm, if you check the FAQ section they make it seem like oral ATP does increase exogenous ATP, which the studies show results in increased performance... "How does PEAK ATP elevate the body's extracellular ATP levels? After ingestion, PEAK ATP is broken down into adenosine and inorganic phosphate. Following rapid absorption by the gut, these compounds are incorporated into and expand the body's liver ATP pools. Detailed experimental animal studies have demonstrated that the turnover of the expanded liver ATP pools supply the necessary precursor, adenosine, for red blood cell ATP synthesis."

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4 Answers

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5
F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on June 05, 2012
at 07:40 PM

I looked at the research page. As far as I can tell, not one of the studies cited evaluates the effect of oral ATP administration on human skeletal muscle or performance. There seems to be some evidence that it can improve circulation, but the leap from improved circulation to increased energy isn't supported.

This might be the reason why: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2253504/

Training studies, apparently, show little or no benefit from oral ATP.

I vote for "total marketing hype".

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:27 PM

Nice link, I guess even with elevated liver/red blood cell/blood plasma levels of ATP its not quite the same as ATP stored in the muscle itself... and it appears that with regards to ATP, rat/mice studies do not correlate with human studies.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:05 PM

Hmmm, if you check the FAQ section they make it seem like oral ATP does increase exogenous ATP, which the studies show results in increased performance... "How does PEAK ATP elevate the body's extracellular ATP levels? After ingestion, PEAK ATP is broken down into adenosine and inorganic phosphate. Following rapid absorption by the gut, these compounds are incorporated into and expand the body's liver ATP pools. Detailed experimental animal studies have demonstrated that the turnover of the expanded liver ATP pools supply the necessary precursor, adenosine, for red blood cell ATP synthesis."

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:44 PM

It should also be noted that the authors do not address chronic loading (I don't know why, seems like it's a logical alternative to acute dosing), where Jordan et al. saw an increase in training volume after 14 days of continuous oral ATP administration... maybe the biggest benefit is with chronic loading to increase volume, possibly decrease recovery time (train harder, build additional muscle)?

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 06, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Good to know... The more I read about creatine, the more I think I really should be supplementing it as part of my lifting program.

F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on June 05, 2012
at 11:35 PM

@jjtitus: The thing is that the amounts of ATP actually stored in muscles cells is tiny. Even if they were doubled, it would still be a very small amount. Especially if oral ATP is broken down to muscle ATP building blocks, you'd have to wonder if oral ATP is better than just supplementing creatine, for example.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 05, 2012
at 08:05 PM

Cont. "In sum, exogenously administered ATP elevates liver ATP pools, which in turn yields elevated red blood cell ATP pools. Subsequently, the expanded red blood cell ATP pools are slowly released into the blood plasma (extracellular). Animal and human studies have both conclusively shown that oral administration of ATP elevates ATP levels in liver, red blood cells and blood plasma."

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on September 11, 2012
at 05:04 PM

Sam, if intramuscular ATP were to increase 100% you would have one HELLUVA product on your hands regardless of the total 'tiny' amount. Thats like saying that 500ng/dl to 1000ng/dl of Testosterone is a 'tiny' amount.

2
74a567cdc8e341f817cd87c1dddc9319

(20)

on September 11, 2012
at 04:35 PM

I have been taking ATP as a supplement for almost 20 years because of a genetic disorder. I take it in the form of injections and sublingual tablet from Douglas Labs. If I do not take the supplement fall into a fugue, become bedridden, seizures, and coma or death. My body's mitochondria does not make sufficient ATP to live and be active.

The brain, heart, and liver are your biggest users of ATP. Signs of low ATP are memory loss, calf pain, problems performing mathmatic formulations, fatgue, nausea, muscle pain ---to start with.

Because of my genetic problems creatine and ribose do not work for me. My proton pump is damaged in the elctron chain transport....

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on September 17, 2012
at 08:51 PM

Interesting, I might look into the sub-lingual...

0
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on September 11, 2012
at 05:05 PM

Ill inject some and let you know how it goes.

-1
6a9c41a5ad20b7cc2239a1df412b63b2

on December 07, 2012
at 01:07 AM

There is a new product out that is proving to be effective in the production of ATP. It does not have the actual ATP molecule in its formula, the ingredients are designed to increase ATP production via the Krebs Cycle where most of our ATP is produced naturally without supplementation.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 07, 2012
at 06:18 AM

Yep, the product is called food.

6a9c41a5ad20b7cc2239a1df412b63b2

(-2)

on December 18, 2012
at 08:15 PM

Yep, food, the Krebs Cycle works through and from 7 enzymes (proteins) which require specific substrates to enhance their activity and function properly. Without adequate substrate supply of all 7, the Krebs Cycle will not work at its maximum efficiency. Combine this with stress, lack of sleep, a daily diet short of nutrients, etc., maximum production of ATP will be deficient. The best product is Power ATP www.topatp.com. They have a money back guarantee, check it out. Because it works, it helps regulate blood sugar levels, the positive side effects are amazing. - Fred

6a9c41a5ad20b7cc2239a1df412b63b2

(-2)

on March 11, 2013
at 07:16 PM

Power ATP's new website is www.poweratp. It will be up in a few weeks.

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