1

votes

Hack my skinny, lethargic, disabled daughter's diet, please.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 24, 2013 at 4:53 PM

Sorry, this will probably be long, but I need help.

A bit of background. My 15 year old daughter has multiple disabilities. She is cognitively disabled (functions at about a 6 year old level), has low muscle tone, and has epilepsy. She is 5'7" and weighs a whopping 95 pounds. One year ago she had part of her brain removed to treat her epilepsy. Her seizures were life threatening and she had multiple status seizures that lasted for hours and landed her on life support in the ICU. She also had a smaller type of seizure that was not life threatening but happened multiple times per day. Obviously all this seizure activity left her exhausted most of the time. Happily, she has been seizure free since her surgery, thank God.

She is still on heavy doses of seizure meds. One of these drugs in particular makes her very tired and gives her headaches. Her epileptologist has given the okay to start reducing this drug and we have seen some increase in energy, but not much. Here is where my question to you comes in.

Since we have been focusing on seizure control for so long, we haven't fiddled with her diet too much. She eats pretty well--we have little to no junk in the house, no fast food, etc. She eats a lot, so I know she has a fast metabolism. She has celiac disease and has been gluten free for years.

The biggest two issues I am facing are her sugar intake and her distaste for meat. While we don't keep candy, cookies, etc in the house, she is addicted to fruit juice and cereal in the morning. We are trying to wean her off those things--mixing apple juice with water, substituting eggs for cereal, etc. She only likes a few types of meat. She likes seafood, but that gets expensive, and hamburger. She will rarely eat steak, and she'll eat chicken cooked just a few ways. She is not dairy free and she eats greek yogurt and cheese pretty often. She also is great with fruits and okay with veggies. Her favorite food is bananas. She would eat a dozen a day if I let her. I've also started her on a high quality multivitamin.

As far as activity goes her adaptive phy ed teacher at school is great and has her walking on the treadmill 20 minutes a day and lifting light weights. Getting her to do much more exercise is pretty tough.

So, hackers, what can I do for this kid to help improve her stamina and energy and maybe put a couple of pounds on her? She is skin and bones eating about 2200 calories a day. I already cook her eggs in coconut oil, buy full fat dairy, and pretty much let her eat as much as she wants. Do I need to try and limit her carbs? My gut says no. Are there other things I should try to up her fat and protein intake? Other supplements that might be helpful? Her pediatrician just says to let her eat what she wants since she is so skinny. Thanks in advance for any advice.

1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

(257)

on March 25, 2013
at 10:00 PM

I know what celiac is, but yeah, I missed that bit ("She has celiac disease and has been gluten free for years."). With talk of eating cereal for breakfast I thought she was eating gluten sometimes.

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 10:35 AM

Basic supplements like Vit. D3 (10000 IU), magnesium, zinc with biotin and b vitamins, iron. I like how Dr. Peter Glidden explains about us all lacking a load of vitamins, nutrients and minerals nowadays due to the soil and foods being different. So I will be looking into that too.

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 10:27 AM

I took DIM , milk thistle, burdock root and vitex originally to fix the hormone related problems and liver. While these improved I also gained weight suddenly. My diet was ketogenic until Dec. but I did not do well on it and so I changed to eating an almost equal amount of fat and good carbs. I need energy from both (i used to be fatigued before getting energy from good fats and carbs). I don't eat grains, but also no potato and rice or milk aside from butter, to be on the safe side. Other than that I eat a very balanced diet, lots of variety, I drink tea and water only. I also take ...

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on March 25, 2013
at 04:15 AM

mireia, what kind of supplements did you take? how was your diet? I started paleo in august 2012- 8 months ago- and at that time was 84 lbs (i'm 5'4"). i was able to get up to 93 lbs at one point last year and then down to 89 lbs again. i usually say 90 is my "hanging around" weight. i figured after 8 months i would've gained way more by now.

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 01:26 AM

Sorry for the typos. I am using a mobile device. Would your doctor work with you when it comes to detoxes? She could be monitored possibly. I was during my liver detox.

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 01:24 AM

We are all affected in different ways and do not show all of the symptoms. I probably did the detox pretty late. I am teice your daughters age and had none of these problems at 15. There are different ways to detox. You don't need to take supplements at once. That said, I took 4 and I never even noticed any of the typical detox symptoms. I simply got better. Her bowel problems would benefit from a colon cleanse. I have not done it yet, but I am looking into a very gentle method. I am sure she had thyroid and such things checked?

Dea5f440698f5488b975ada2f61daa0d

(393)

on March 24, 2013
at 11:03 PM

My understanding is that two steps to cleaning up a diet would be to remove all grains and all added sugar, which I think would help the immune system. I also think that more coconut oil in the diet might help energy and stamina, and this is typically added to the diet in small increments.

1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

(257)

on March 24, 2013
at 10:57 PM

The magnesium and omega-3's might be the most directly relevant ones here, but vitamin D is important for many things like immune system so it's good to boost it. K2 helps get the calcium into bones and teeth instead of arteries, so you can see how that might be useful ;-)

1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

(257)

on March 24, 2013
at 10:52 PM

sorry, vitamins K2 and D3. K2 is important for calcium and D3 metabolism, see www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-cofactors/

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 09:53 PM

Yeah, she eats potatoes and I load them up with butter. She really like sweet potatoes too. She is diagnosed with Celiac Disease, so we are strict with the no gluten policy. I like your idea of trying to keep lower sugar at lunch. What is K2? Potassium?

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 09:48 PM

You know, I've thought about detoxes for her. I'm just SCARED to do it because I've read about people having trouble with the actual detox process and she is so fragile I just don't know if it would be safe. She does have major issues with constipation (sorry TMI) and I feel like that is somehow related. Her doc isn't really worried that she is malnourished. She menstruates, skin is good, no dark circles, all blood work is normal. She's just so dang tired all the time.

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 09:45 PM

Crowbar, I'm so sorry you're having trouble finding services for your daughter. While my kiddo is disabled enough to easily qualify, she also doesn't have an "easy" diagnosis and I know how frustrating it is to try and do the right thing and get help for someone you love so much. It is terribly expensive to take care of these special kids. Fortunately I have good health insurance, but no amount of money can cover the worrying and the time and the stress. Hang in there.

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:58 PM

Unfortunately, the biggest problem is not enough resources and money. The province will pay foster parents 3-4 grand a month to take care of kids like this, but I get less than $300. Even though I haven't been able to work for the past four years. Also, because of the uniqueness of my daughter's condition, and it's complexity, just finding a high school program that was suitable took 2 years. She gets turned down from programs all the time. All I ask is that people remember us when you vote!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:53 PM

The kibble I switched him to around the same time has taurine fortification, so for all I know, that could be the real reason.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:50 PM

+1 for mentioning taurine. It turns out there is a lot of medical literature on taurine and epilepsy. Maybe ask your doctor how he feels about it for her? I've coincidentally found taurine increases my appetite (probably because it increases stomach acid), so maybe it will also help her with weight gain? Food for thought.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:46 PM

Yeah, she's quite good.

81feb1022a28f534867616b9316c7aa4

(638)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:42 PM

Sorry to be off topic, but a dog neurologist.. That's awesome! I didn't know people could train in that!

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:34 PM

Bless all of you. I've worked in group homes for people with disabilities. The saddest part was never that these people had the difficulties they had, but that their families and caretakers couldn't pull through for them. Not to judge across the board, but I've learned a lot and am always glad to see people taking on these challenges.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:44 PM

The RDA for her would 360mg, so a few capsules a day should be helpful. The specific brand I use is made by "Solaray." BTW I'm obviously not a doctor, so you might want to run it by yours. If they're anything like any doctor I've ever talked to though, they'll give you a blank stare.

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:38 PM

Well that is really good to know! What type of dosage am I looking at?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:36 PM

Yeah in your case I would have done what you did, but I bet these things would still help. A magnesium insufficiency will cause the nervous system to go haywire, which will result in seizures in those who are susceptible. Lots of people report improvement as a result of supplementation.

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:34 PM

Thanks, David. I was just typing my response to Travis as you were posting, so I know you didn't see my comment on my daughter and the ketogenic diet. Her epileptologist told us it would be unlikely to work for her. Epilepsy is like cancer--lots of different kinds. I just want to fatten this skinny little thing up a bit and have her not crashing on the couch by 3 pm. Always nice to talk to another special needs parent!

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:32 PM

Her epilepsy was so severe that trying to fix it via diet was literally risking her life, but I know there are many nutritional treatments, including the ketogenic diet. However, her type of epilepsy was one that traditionally does not respond well to dietary intervention. At this point since we are post surgery I'm just trying to make her quality of life better by improving her nutrition. I don't know a ton about magnesium other than its benefits for anxiety (since I have that). How might it help? thanks and I hope your dog continues to do well. :)

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10 Answers

4
Medium avatar

on March 24, 2013
at 05:25 PM

First off, I wouldn't restrict anything except maybe junk food.

I don't know how helpful this is, but shortly after adopting my dog, I discovered that he has epilepsy. He was having a cluster of several grand mal seizures over a 24-hour period every few weeks. Being the stubborn person that I am, I was certain that I could correct it nutritionally. The first thing I did was give him 100mg of magnesium glycinate with every one of his meals. This made a big difference and pushed his cluster frequency out to about every 2-3 months. The next thing I did was give him 3-4 omega-3 egg yolks from hard-boiled eggs a day. Since doing that, he hasn't had a seizure in a little over 6 months. He's not on any anticonvulsants. His neurologist said she'd feel better about the situation if the frequency were at the 6 month mark, so here we are. He also gets a fair amount of freeze-dried beef liver treats, which may be addressing some other nutrient insufficiency.

If he ever has another cluster, I'll probably add taurine to the mix. I couldn't tell you for sure what about the eggs has made such a big difference, since it could be the DHA, the sphingolipids, the choline, the cholesterol, the fat soluble vitamins etc. but whatever it is, it seems to be working well. I'm guessing that pastured eggs would be a better choice, but I'm afraid to monkey with it since it's working. As with damn near everyone else, I'm guessing that your daughter would benefit from the magnesium.

81feb1022a28f534867616b9316c7aa4

(638)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:42 PM

Sorry to be off topic, but a dog neurologist.. That's awesome! I didn't know people could train in that!

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:32 PM

Her epilepsy was so severe that trying to fix it via diet was literally risking her life, but I know there are many nutritional treatments, including the ketogenic diet. However, her type of epilepsy was one that traditionally does not respond well to dietary intervention. At this point since we are post surgery I'm just trying to make her quality of life better by improving her nutrition. I don't know a ton about magnesium other than its benefits for anxiety (since I have that). How might it help? thanks and I hope your dog continues to do well. :)

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:46 PM

Yeah, she's quite good.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:50 PM

+1 for mentioning taurine. It turns out there is a lot of medical literature on taurine and epilepsy. Maybe ask your doctor how he feels about it for her? I've coincidentally found taurine increases my appetite (probably because it increases stomach acid), so maybe it will also help her with weight gain? Food for thought.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:53 PM

The kibble I switched him to around the same time has taurine fortification, so for all I know, that could be the real reason.

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:38 PM

Well that is really good to know! What type of dosage am I looking at?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:44 PM

The RDA for her would 360mg, so a few capsules a day should be helpful. The specific brand I use is made by "Solaray." BTW I'm obviously not a doctor, so you might want to run it by yours. If they're anything like any doctor I've ever talked to though, they'll give you a blank stare.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:36 PM

Yeah in your case I would have done what you did, but I bet these things would still help. A magnesium insufficiency will cause the nervous system to go haywire, which will result in seizures in those who are susceptible. Lots of people report improvement as a result of supplementation.

2
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on March 24, 2013
at 06:24 PM

My daughter has these same problems. She had a stroke at birth, has had epilepsy her whole life as well as other issues. Some of her seizure meds made her anorexic. She is a sugar fiend, a picky eater, and has low energy.

One issue that she's always faced is poor sleep quality. She's 14 now, and could sleep 15 hours a day. Mornings are terribly rough. I have a policy of when I think she needs it, I keep her home from school and let her sleep.

My kid also has low energy and muscle tone. I make up for things that are obvious exercise with things that she may not realise are exercise. For instance, I don't drive, so she has to walk everywhere with me. I have also been saving for a year to get her this bike http://www.industrialbicycles.com/teamdualtrike.htm

Which she is very excited about. I also got us a dog. Admittedly, I walk the dog all the time, but she plays with it, and that's good.

The meds are super hard on them. :/ Unfortunately, there's not much you can do about their effects. These kids, so picky with food. I get the things I know she will eat, and just stick with those. Maybe learn to bake a few items with coconut flour and stevia? We make our own pop with carbonated water, flavouring from a brewing shop (like rootbeer) and stevia, and she can't tell the difference. If she can eat seafood, hamburger, and chicken a few ways, we'll that's not bad. I'd try introducing something new once or twice a week, but not make a big to-do about it. Load her up with butter, cheese, what veggies she likes. She may not add any weight until she stops growing. My daughter is a good weight. but doesn't gain no matter what she eats. Somehow, they get enough.

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 09:45 PM

Crowbar, I'm so sorry you're having trouble finding services for your daughter. While my kiddo is disabled enough to easily qualify, she also doesn't have an "easy" diagnosis and I know how frustrating it is to try and do the right thing and get help for someone you love so much. It is terribly expensive to take care of these special kids. Fortunately I have good health insurance, but no amount of money can cover the worrying and the time and the stress. Hang in there.

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:58 PM

Unfortunately, the biggest problem is not enough resources and money. The province will pay foster parents 3-4 grand a month to take care of kids like this, but I get less than $300. Even though I haven't been able to work for the past four years. Also, because of the uniqueness of my daughter's condition, and it's complexity, just finding a high school program that was suitable took 2 years. She gets turned down from programs all the time. All I ask is that people remember us when you vote!

Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

(3452)

on March 24, 2013
at 06:34 PM

Bless all of you. I've worked in group homes for people with disabilities. The saddest part was never that these people had the difficulties they had, but that their families and caretakers couldn't pull through for them. Not to judge across the board, but I've learned a lot and am always glad to see people taking on these challenges.

2
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on March 24, 2013
at 06:20 PM

You don't have to 'fix it via diet' exactly. But a high cholesterol diet paired with the pharma-therapy couldn't hurt, could it? (Not rhetorical exactly... I'm a bit out of my element here.)

Otherwise, I've found a great upper-body workout for my 6-year old niece has been to put a bar in a doorway she can reach lying down and do prone pull-ups & elevated push-ups. Or you could rig some light bands. The right coffee- or end table worked while I was figuring this out...

Be very careful of any upright exercises, though. The slightest deviance in form can cause serious tweaks in the back and neck. I find that this age can't really understand how to maintain proper form while exerting themselves.

1
Ef777978cfeb8fbdd18d75c4f6c4cb23

on March 24, 2013
at 05:32 PM

Hi, I too have a child with a disability. My son who is 14 has Down's Syndrome. He also functions in many ways like a 6 or 7 year old. He has a robust appetite so I let him eat pretty much what he likes, without letting him go mad.

There is some evidence that a ketogenic diet will help with epilepsy. Google "epilepsy ketogenic" & you'll find plenty to read through. You could start here. http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/09/migraine-sufferers-should-try-a-ketogenic-diet/

My view is that we need to be gentle and cautious with our kids. Regular kids can get their own way with a number of strategies that they develop during their life, but our children are very vulnerable, so I would suggest you change your child's diet very gently over weeks and months.

good luck with what you decide.

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 05:34 PM

Thanks, David. I was just typing my response to Travis as you were posting, so I know you didn't see my comment on my daughter and the ketogenic diet. Her epileptologist told us it would be unlikely to work for her. Epilepsy is like cancer--lots of different kinds. I just want to fatten this skinny little thing up a bit and have her not crashing on the couch by 3 pm. Always nice to talk to another special needs parent!

0
A003a0e704118f11b86a6e1fbbb13cd7

on March 25, 2013
at 05:17 PM

Perhaps you could try subbing her cereal for some Larabars. They are high calorie (mostly from nuts) and are pretty sweet.

Also, if she likes hamburger I would run with it... making meatballs, tacos, stuffed peppers/mushrooms, etc. and try and load them up with some hidden veggies (onions, mushrooms, spinach, etc.) chopped up inside.

Also, if her favorite food is bananas I know you don't need help getting her to eat them, but maybe you could sneak some more foods in with them. I love freezing super ripe bananas and then mashing them up to make "banana soft serve" and then you can top it with some shredded coconut, coconut cream, nuts, nut butter, etc.

0
3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

on March 25, 2013
at 11:48 AM

One more thought I had regarding Gluten...are all cosmetics gluten free? Trace amounts like a tiny bit of flour from someone elses bread can also cause inflammation when just touched.

0
04a4f204bc2e589fa30fd31b92944549

(975)

on March 25, 2013
at 12:58 AM

PaleoRocks you must not understand what Celiac Disease is. It destroys part of your small intestine if you eat even minute amounts of gluten. Over time if you continue to eat gluten you will suffer malnutrition and even failure of other organs. Just wanted to be clear about that since you said "keep her off gluten if you can but don't obsess".

1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

(257)

on March 25, 2013
at 10:00 PM

I know what celiac is, but yeah, I missed that bit ("She has celiac disease and has been gluten free for years."). With talk of eating cereal for breakfast I thought she was eating gluten sometimes.

0
2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

on March 24, 2013
at 10:56 PM

For her I would do a combo of Ray Peat/Matt Stone (higher quality). She needs nutrient dense calories. I'm talking about organic ice cream (home made even from raw cream) and lots of it. Avoid the grains. Lots of cheese, yogurt, meat, bacon, salt, maple syrup, honey, sweet potatoes. And feed her all the time. Greek yogurt is great. Make it full fat and try to source locally or organic. Hot chocolate. (Things that have a great amount of fat and glucose). Great source of fuel-especially for the brain.I would also get her on niacin (low dose because it can cause flushing) and vitamin d-3. Liquid-nutrient dense calories will be a great ally. Orange juice. Let her eat a ton of high quality ice cream it is very therepeutic. Drop the paleo idea and focus on high quality foods instead.If she likes chicken-try wrapping it in bacon and cooking it in bacon fat. Also do some research into coconut oil. Try Ray peats ice cream-add some chocolate chips (Camino) to it. It is so important for the brain to have MCTS. :)

0
1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

on March 24, 2013
at 09:41 PM

If she can handle dairy, that can be good for building muscle tone. Potatoes are good as well and an omega-3 supplement. Keep her off gluten if you can, but don't obsess over it, just go for the "eat real food" idea. As I say, dairy might actually be useful if she handles it ok - greek yogurt and cheese are great, you could put butter on her veg too? Maybe try some whole milk and see how she handles that. Maybe fruit and heavy cream for a dessert?

I wouldn't get too worried about sugar, especially morning and evening, it sounds like she needs calories most. If you can make the lunch lower carb that might help with the 3 o'clock crash, but if you can't, so be it. I eat a banana most days myself, maybe let her have one morning and evening? I certainly wouldn't worry about steak, how many kids do eat it? Feed her good quality fatty burgers (cheeseburger?) as often as you can instead! Maybe something like eggs for breakfast, meat/fish & veg for lunch, carbs in the evening, with some dairy at all meals? I would try and stick to 3 defined (and big!) meals though, no snacking inbetween.

I would go for the usual supplements, magnesium (use glycinate), K2, D3, and try some omega 3s as well, I've come across a few people who think they've helped them tone up a bit, even without exercise.

1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

(257)

on March 24, 2013
at 10:57 PM

The magnesium and omega-3's might be the most directly relevant ones here, but vitamin D is important for many things like immune system so it's good to boost it. K2 helps get the calcium into bones and teeth instead of arteries, so you can see how that might be useful ;-)

1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

(257)

on March 24, 2013
at 10:52 PM

sorry, vitamins K2 and D3. K2 is important for calcium and D3 metabolism, see www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-cofactors/

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 09:53 PM

Yeah, she eats potatoes and I load them up with butter. She really like sweet potatoes too. She is diagnosed with Celiac Disease, so we are strict with the no gluten policy. I like your idea of trying to keep lower sugar at lunch. What is K2? Potassium?

0
3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

on March 24, 2013
at 09:32 PM

I had trouble gaining weight for most of my life, but especially the older I got.

My recent low was 99lbs at 5'5". I had been on a Paleo diet for 9 months and was surprised I was not gaining eating so many calories (up to 3700 at one point! Lots of fat)

I think what was happening is that I had trouble absorbing my calories and nutrients. By September last year I looked like death, skinny, dark circles under my eyes. A bit after my hair started falling out and my period became irregular and I had PMS and acne. My liver enzymes were also elevated as well as my thyroids TSH.

I then looked into detox and started taking herbal supplements.

Most of my problems resolved in a matter of weeks. My liver and thyroid were fine after 1 1/2 months, my dark circles went away, and my body replenished the fat in my face, I had my healthy glow back. At the same time I also finally gained weight and am now at 110lbs!

I can keep my weight up by eating a much lower amount of calories (1400), though right now I am going for gaining a bit more by eating close to 2000.


My experiences makes me think detoxes are good and necessary. Often because of all kinds of factors, toxins, illnesses, chemicals...our body is unable to detox because it is just so much. I am looking into gut healing that will help me absorb more nutrients and calories. It is just a guess from my side, but maybe your daughter has a similar problem and this would be a start.

All the best to you and your daughter!

34f17a568b81675b8eda405cf2ee6a75

(20)

on March 24, 2013
at 09:48 PM

You know, I've thought about detoxes for her. I'm just SCARED to do it because I've read about people having trouble with the actual detox process and she is so fragile I just don't know if it would be safe. She does have major issues with constipation (sorry TMI) and I feel like that is somehow related. Her doc isn't really worried that she is malnourished. She menstruates, skin is good, no dark circles, all blood work is normal. She's just so dang tired all the time.

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 01:26 AM

Sorry for the typos. I am using a mobile device. Would your doctor work with you when it comes to detoxes? She could be monitored possibly. I was during my liver detox.

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 10:27 AM

I took DIM , milk thistle, burdock root and vitex originally to fix the hormone related problems and liver. While these improved I also gained weight suddenly. My diet was ketogenic until Dec. but I did not do well on it and so I changed to eating an almost equal amount of fat and good carbs. I need energy from both (i used to be fatigued before getting energy from good fats and carbs). I don't eat grains, but also no potato and rice or milk aside from butter, to be on the safe side. Other than that I eat a very balanced diet, lots of variety, I drink tea and water only. I also take ...

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 01:24 AM

We are all affected in different ways and do not show all of the symptoms. I probably did the detox pretty late. I am teice your daughters age and had none of these problems at 15. There are different ways to detox. You don't need to take supplements at once. That said, I took 4 and I never even noticed any of the typical detox symptoms. I simply got better. Her bowel problems would benefit from a colon cleanse. I have not done it yet, but I am looking into a very gentle method. I am sure she had thyroid and such things checked?

3959828c57f2aeddc08e5f374e92ad36

(87)

on March 25, 2013
at 10:35 AM

Basic supplements like Vit. D3 (10000 IU), magnesium, zinc with biotin and b vitamins, iron. I like how Dr. Peter Glidden explains about us all lacking a load of vitamins, nutrients and minerals nowadays due to the soil and foods being different. So I will be looking into that too.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on March 25, 2013
at 04:15 AM

mireia, what kind of supplements did you take? how was your diet? I started paleo in august 2012- 8 months ago- and at that time was 84 lbs (i'm 5'4"). i was able to get up to 93 lbs at one point last year and then down to 89 lbs again. i usually say 90 is my "hanging around" weight. i figured after 8 months i would've gained way more by now.

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