1

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Otter emotionally eats...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 05, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Well maybe...

What do you think is going on here?

Do non human persons (ie animals) emotionally eat like some humans do? If so, what could be the implications of this? (And anything else you want to say...)

http://www.dailylife.com.au/dl-people/dl-entertainment/otter-dislikes-watermelon-but-cant-stop-eating-it-20130116-2csmg.html

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 06, 2013
at 02:17 PM

Yes it is probably a hoax or beatup.., A tabloidish story, but if it were so the implications could be interesting. Like you I've never been aware of a wild animal that is 'overweight', except bears, but that is for a specific purpose over a limited period of time. Must be an availability of food type of thing... 'Civilisation' heh, good in some ways, (potentially, and often overtly) debilitating in others...

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 06, 2013
at 02:09 PM

Interesting.... I definitely can see where you're coming from and tend to agree. Simply - the stresses of 'civilisation' make us prone to get sick, fat, etc... Constant availability of palatable food is certainly a factor for many (amongst others... By the way one could reasonably argue the ways rats/mice are sometimes treated is unethical as well. Certainly 'oncomice' are questionable...

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on February 05, 2013
at 07:39 PM

We nust break free of our chains!

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2 Answers

2
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 05, 2013
at 05:53 PM

Animals in captivity (domestic cats and dogs) are well-known for overeating. I knew a cat that was so fat, it had a hard time jumping on a sofa. The owners had to get a special step for him. Different animals, including gorillas in the zoo overeat as well . I remember reading an article where gorillas were becoming obese and were put on a diet (they fed them some processed food at the zoo - which sounds like animal abuse to me).

However, I do not know any recorded case of a wild animal being obese. Hence my question - maybe people should be wild and being in captivity makes them overeat?

Just a thought.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on February 05, 2013
at 07:39 PM

We nust break free of our chains!

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 06, 2013
at 02:09 PM

Interesting.... I definitely can see where you're coming from and tend to agree. Simply - the stresses of 'civilisation' make us prone to get sick, fat, etc... Constant availability of palatable food is certainly a factor for many (amongst others... By the way one could reasonably argue the ways rats/mice are sometimes treated is unethical as well. Certainly 'oncomice' are questionable...

2
24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on February 05, 2013
at 01:46 PM

Rather difficult to tell from stills whether this is a hoax. It comes from a lady in Australia with no apparent expertise of animals, from photos she somehow receive from zoo in Czech Republic.

I'd guess wildlife that over-ate to obesity would be taken down rather quickly by the wolves/lions/hyenas.

Whenever I watch National Geographic Safari, I always gaze upon the wilderbeests as slabs of steak. Were I a lion, I'd go straight for the awkwardly lumbering fat one, and not the young, the old, or the sickly, emaciated ones.

And with predators.. may we never see the male lion with rolls of ab fat... firstly, he would not catch the high speed gazelles. Judging by the video, the lions are just fast enough... and only if in close range. And if one replies the lionesses do the hunting, well, the male incumbent still must fend off the powerfully young nomad males.

Edit: Wild animals that hibernate, such as bears, come to mind as species that deliberately accumulate body fat. A few species store food outside their body, such as squirrels (acorns - seed and nut). I've seen pet cats (domesticated, of course) grow to become inert and grossly obese. But in the wild? Always either young, adult lean and muscular, or aged, scraggly, and about to die. Never obese wild otherwise healthy...

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on February 06, 2013
at 02:17 PM

Yes it is probably a hoax or beatup.., A tabloidish story, but if it were so the implications could be interesting. Like you I've never been aware of a wild animal that is 'overweight', except bears, but that is for a specific purpose over a limited period of time. Must be an availability of food type of thing... 'Civilisation' heh, good in some ways, (potentially, and often overtly) debilitating in others...

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