4

votes

Earbuds and electromagnetic radiation. Have you used Mercolas blue tube headphones?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 02, 2012 at 12:58 AM

Have any of you tried Dr. Mercolas blue tube earbuds for your phone? They use a tube like a stethoscope to channel the sound into your head rather than having the electric wired speakers touching your skull.

If you have used it, how is the sound quality? Can you hear it well in a loud subway?

I always talk on the phone on my right side and curiously the hairs right above my right ear grows 2-3x faster than on my left. My grandfather has brain cancer so I am looking at ways to lower electromagnetic frequency radiation to my head.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on May 19, 2014
at 05:56 PM

Yes, I'm 99.9999999999999999999998% sure that it's perfectly fine to use earbuds, headphones, and other magnets. I wouldn't put the cell phone to my ear, but otherwise, whatever. Power is a function of the square root of the distance. Use a clip.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 03, 2012
at 02:04 PM

Cell frequencies are right around the GHz region (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_frequencies). Microwaves only heat water because they're focused in that little box as a standing wave. Compare the intensity of a 1.5kW microwave oven focused into a small area with a 600mW antenna that radiates in all directions. It's not even the same discussion.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:02 AM

To clarify, your microwave oven works at 2GHz, this is because you can get water molecules to resonate around that range, so it gets to heat things up quickly. Cell phones don't work in the 2GHz range, though WiFi does - the issue isn't that as much, but harmonic frequencies - most transmitters don't just transmit at one frequency, but rather there is leakage at certain fractions of that frequency, so it is possible for a cell phone to reach 2GHz, though at a much smaller wattage. (Google TEMPEST and see how that works.)

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 12:22 AM

Miked you may be right about his product being useless (or not) but I thought it was now well accepted that cell phone radiation causes issues. I thought even the CDC, years behind other countries as usually, finally admitted that it likely posed some danger. I cannot recall the exact research but will attempt to find. It was all over the news. Also a link between pregnant moms using cells and subsequent increased risk of neuro-developmental and behavioral issues in the children.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 02, 2012
at 02:44 AM

Please use the word "literally" properly (the first time you used it).

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 02, 2012
at 02:43 AM

Please use the word "literally" properly. Thank you. At least the first time you used it.

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5 Answers

6
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 02, 2012
at 02:35 PM

Those look like they're designed and priced for people who 1) don't understand what electromagnetic radiation is and 2) are afraid of it because of scary words like "electromagnetic" and "radiation".

I've made a bunch of posts on here before and raydawg in this thread has some good comments to, so I won't go on. But after looking at Mercola's website I see two things:

1 - he says EMR is bad and scary, which is just not true. Some types of EMR aren't good for you (X-rays, e.g.), but other is harmless (visible light - at reasonable intensities). Cellphones are in the GHz range which is solidly in the class of non-ionizing radiation, which means that it doesn't even interact with your body. Think of it this way, if cell phone radiation interacted with your body, it'd get absorbed by people and never make it to the tower and you'd never have any reception. The frequencies that cellphones work at was chosen so that it could go through people and walls and everything and make it to the tower.

2 - he says that his magic headphones work by reducing EMR at the head. But I see no data that shows that, just random claims and pictures of how bad cell phones are but no pictures of how good his headphones are. So even if I thought that EMR (in the GHz range) was bad for you, I still don't see any proof that his magic headphones are better than standard ones.

Edited to add: to put this in perspective with the paleo diet and such - look at how his website is worded. It's all about "scary" stuff that "science" has shown is bad. Just like that scary saturated fat that science says will kill you.

4ef079c57d2140bba4dbf4e30240a645

(4413)

on August 03, 2012
at 12:22 AM

Miked you may be right about his product being useless (or not) but I thought it was now well accepted that cell phone radiation causes issues. I thought even the CDC, years behind other countries as usually, finally admitted that it likely posed some danger. I cannot recall the exact research but will attempt to find. It was all over the news. Also a link between pregnant moms using cells and subsequent increased risk of neuro-developmental and behavioral issues in the children.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 03, 2012
at 02:04 PM

Cell frequencies are right around the GHz region (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_frequencies). Microwaves only heat water because they're focused in that little box as a standing wave. Compare the intensity of a 1.5kW microwave oven focused into a small area with a 600mW antenna that radiates in all directions. It's not even the same discussion.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:02 AM

To clarify, your microwave oven works at 2GHz, this is because you can get water molecules to resonate around that range, so it gets to heat things up quickly. Cell phones don't work in the 2GHz range, though WiFi does - the issue isn't that as much, but harmonic frequencies - most transmitters don't just transmit at one frequency, but rather there is leakage at certain fractions of that frequency, so it is possible for a cell phone to reach 2GHz, though at a much smaller wattage. (Google TEMPEST and see how that works.)

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 02, 2012
at 10:09 AM

The fingernails on my left hand tend to grow faster than those on my right hand. It's meaningless as a measure, and has more to do with blood flow from the heart than anything else. I don't hold my cellphone in my left hand, I keep it in my backpack.

I'm not sure why the hairs above your right ear would grow any faster than those on the left, but it likely is for the same reason.

I use normal blackberry earbuds which work well. I do worry about the frequencies being generated from cell phones, and their harmonic frequencies may be close to those of the resonance frequency of water, so that's why I don't hold the cellphone up to my head (since they are near microwaves), but rather use the earbuds. However, I don't believe that they can travel up the earphone cable into my head.

The antenna inside the cellphone is very small and has a very specific shape for a reason - it's been designed and optimized to receive and send a certain set of frequencies. A long cable, such as that of the normal earphones is not optimized this way and will not permit those frequencies to travel that way. So, I don't worry about it. I'd be more worried about leakage from a microwave oven than whatever might travel up that cable.

Now, if you're worried that the tiny neodymium electromagnets in the earbuds are going to emiit electromagnetic waves, that's certainly possible, however, I wouldn't much worry about those specific frequencies, which are the same as the audible range, much affecting human tissue. If they did, then simply hearing anything would cause us cancer.

So, IMHO, don't put the cellphone in your pocket or on your belt, don't hold it up to your head, and you'll be fine.

0
54599fa6022bf7ef9d4aaab873265228

on May 18, 2014
at 06:10 PM

@raydawg 23225, so is it safe to use earbuds? Not bring a smart ass just need a yes or no. I don't carry a backpack so where would I carry my phone safely? If it's in my pocket it can get me. How come it doesn't get you through the backpack. I'm on my phone till my ear is hot and (I know gross)all sweaty.its hard for me to understand all the information. Iam on disability. So the cell phone is my only entertainment. Yet Iam concerned. Sounds like the earbuds r the way to go? Thanks for your answer back in

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on May 19, 2014
at 05:56 PM

Yes, I'm 99.9999999999999999999998% sure that it's perfectly fine to use earbuds, headphones, and other magnets. I wouldn't put the cell phone to my ear, but otherwise, whatever. Power is a function of the square root of the distance. Use a clip.

0
038f1eb21da8f9d6259a67d5694cf968

on February 07, 2013
at 05:18 PM

I don't think we will have to wait 30 years for that hard-of-hearing aging population. You are too young, perhaps, to remember that in the 'golden age' of rock-n-roll, fans often stood right in front of 6 ft. high speakers while music blasted out of them for hours in clubs and at concerts. I have often thought I should put my savings into hearing aid stock because the baby boomers will lead the pack on the road to deafness.

0
11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on August 03, 2012
at 02:11 PM

Maybe you should consider not using earbuds. Not because of the radiation worries, but because of potential hearing damage.

I recently tried a pair of volume limiting earbuds by DB Logic that is supposed to limit the max volume to a level that will not damage your hearing. I was struck by the fact that the volume level is no where near as high as I normally use--not even close.

The iPod has spawned a generation of people who use earbuds hours on end at a volume level shown to cause hearing damage over the long run. Thirty years from now will we have an epidemic middle-age people that have hearing problems?

To put a paleo spin on this, man evolved to live in a world where our ears were constantly bombarded with loud noises. We certainly haven't adapted to having a sound source 1/2 inch away from our eardrums for hours at a time.

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