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How have folks dealt with emergency preparedness food stores?

Commented on October 17, 2013
Created October 15, 2013 at 7:24 PM

I have a pantry full of non paleo food stores ??? ramen, white rice, white flour, corn meal, pancake mix, beans, noodles etc from the before time of great health changes in my life. I plan to just monitor them and toss them as I notice they have gone bad. As I made the switch for health not allergy reasons, should an emergency happen, at least I won???t starve and eating paleo will be the least of my worries. What have others done about their long term food stores? A lot of what I have is collected from sales ??? ie cases of ramen at 5 cents a pack. My paleo diet, isn???t exactly cheap or long term store-able. With sales of non paleo food ??? I can have stores that would have me fed for months for under $100. A $100 of nuts and dried fruit / veggies / meat I???m not sure would last a month.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 17, 2013
at 11:00 PM

8) yah I'm in the same boat,need to buy a dehydrator... I have the food sealer though and a case of bags - freezer is full of veggies I bagged up from my garden. I was reading a few days ago about dehydrating raw eggs, and someone reported DIY results lasting over 3 years .

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 17, 2013
at 05:34 PM

I'm glad after growing up in san fran bay area and surviving the 89 earthquake, that living in georgia all I have to worry about is inclement weather.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 05:41 PM

Most my stores are in my own canisters which I want to keep and as far I know, all donation places want unopened factory sealed packages.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 05:38 PM

I'm always worried about pickling - more so for multi year storage, one jar with botulism and its over, which without a full canning setup and doing it ad hock worries me, maybe it's time to also finally get all the proper tools for canning. I never looked at fermentation as long term, I always considered those short term packages, made some yummy fermented pickles a couple years back.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on October 16, 2013
at 02:37 AM

Just a suggestion, but if you're not going to eat your non-paleo food stores, why don't you donate them to a food pantry? Although, a case could be made for saving the white rice and maybe the corn meal and beans.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 12:14 AM

Good suggestions -- could possibly roll up yams into the pemmican @SenseiPaleo mentions. I haven't started using any oils, been hearing a lot about coconut. I eat pretty plain, most complicated thing I usually make is ground meat diced veggies garlic mashed together, formed into a large patty then grilled other than it's single items grilled as they are, yams, meat etc.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 12:04 AM

I wonder what the average shelf life would be on that. I'll have to look into it, I'm hoping for stuff that's shelf stable for at least a year, multiple year preferred. But still even a 3 month supply is better than no month supply when the world ends. I'll have to consider making batches of this, I already eat mixtures of nuts seeds dried berries given I have gout and can't consume vast amounts of chicken/turkey/pork - i learned that painful lesson a year ago when I made the switch to paleo.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 15, 2013
at 11:56 PM

I'm out in the country and can hear the coyotes @ night. Setting up proper environment and maintenance of such for animals is a bit pricey. Though I have thought of goats rather than chickens. I also live near the lake, all my fish is fresh/fresh frozen so never look for tuna/salmon when I have a freezer of it. I'll have to start watching for sales on tuna/salmon.

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5 Answers

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on October 16, 2013
at 11:08 PM

Great ideas above. Here's another: During the summer I dry foods (fruits and veggies) in my dehydrator and seal them in vacuum sealed jars. As long as the "big one" (earthquake) doesn't break all my jars I'm good ;o)

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 17, 2013
at 05:34 PM

I'm glad after growing up in san fran bay area and surviving the 89 earthquake, that living in georgia all I have to worry about is inclement weather.

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 16, 2013
at 05:42 AM

pickling things is an option, veggies, fish, eggs, other?

i'm thinking pickling rather than fermentation, ie. using vinegar or brine, but fermentation may be an option as well (to increase shelf life) if so inclined?

& some cheeses store for a long time, if you like cheese.

dried fish, dried meat,

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 05:38 PM

I'm always worried about pickling - more so for multi year storage, one jar with botulism and its over, which without a full canning setup and doing it ad hock worries me, maybe it's time to also finally get all the proper tools for canning. I never looked at fermentation as long term, I always considered those short term packages, made some yummy fermented pickles a couple years back.

0
Medium avatar

on October 15, 2013
at 10:43 PM

This is something that's really been concerning me too. I'd like to think I'm zombie-apocalypse-approved. I haven't fully taken action yet and I'm eager to see what others come up with but here are my thoughts as I mentally prepare myself:

-Lots of canned foods (I try to eat fresh but there are tons of canned meats/veggies/fruits that could still nourish) including plenty of sardines, spam(yeah I said spam), and about 10 cans of coconut cream since I could live on the stuff.

-nuts; mostly macadamias.

-squashes, melons, gourds... Some of these can keep on the counter for a 1-3 months

-potatoes/yams/tubers... can also last a few weeks, or months if kept wrapped up in the fridge.

-plenty of coconut and olive oil since they're high in calories and easy to add to all the other food and will keep you going when things get rough.

-honey I guess; it lasts a long time and would go good with the squash and maybe on the yams.

<Edit> based on @daz's replies...

-hard cheeses

-pickled veggies (the industrially preserved and unrefregerated, rather than the fermented sauerkraut and pickles I usually buy out of the store refrigerator)

-Maybe some jerky though I try to avoid the jerky...

<End Edit>

<Edit> Wow @Janknitz I don't know how I missed that one! *Faceplam*

-dehydrated fruits, especially if stored in vacuum-sealed plastic! I really need to buy a dehydrator.

**BTW I keep editing because I'm going to come back to this and take action based on what we figure out here, not trying to steal anyone's thunder.

<End Edit>

It's not cheap but if you're planning to live for a couple months on $100 then you should be prepared to feel pretty crappy and not have much energy.

You'd be dying for some fresh fruit or greens if that's what you're used to but the best you could do is canned right? Any other ideas? Looking at my list makes me feel a little queasy for a month or more... but better than cup-o-noodles.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 12:14 AM

Good suggestions -- could possibly roll up yams into the pemmican @SenseiPaleo mentions. I haven't started using any oils, been hearing a lot about coconut. I eat pretty plain, most complicated thing I usually make is ground meat diced veggies garlic mashed together, formed into a large patty then grilled other than it's single items grilled as they are, yams, meat etc.

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 17, 2013
at 11:00 PM

8) yah I'm in the same boat,need to buy a dehydrator... I have the food sealer though and a case of bags - freezer is full of veggies I bagged up from my garden. I was reading a few days ago about dehydrating raw eggs, and someone reported DIY results lasting over 3 years .

0
Cd6ffaf8c6b1ad60e9c9b3ae450d4984

on October 15, 2013
at 07:42 PM

I have something that you may love! It is called Pemmican. It is a mixture of dried pulverized meat with rendered fat (sometimes chokecherries or other berries) that is compressed and again dried. This was hunter/warrior food for the Lakota people and many other indigenous peoples around the world. Some native friends of mine have said that it could last as long as a few years, but don't quote me on that. The benefit of this is that you can do it yourself and if you hunt, you can even get your own ingredients. Can you imagine that back in the day they had to dry the meat in the sun or by the fire and then smash it between two rocks to pulverize it? We, luckily, can use a food processer.

Here are some good sources for you to explore this.

Here is a good blog post about pemmican as an emergency food that I think you would like.

PDFon how to make it.

Let me know how it goes! @James 44

Adam Chevalier

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 16, 2013
at 12:04 AM

I wonder what the average shelf life would be on that. I'll have to look into it, I'm hoping for stuff that's shelf stable for at least a year, multiple year preferred. But still even a 3 month supply is better than no month supply when the world ends. I'll have to consider making batches of this, I already eat mixtures of nuts seeds dried berries given I have gout and can't consume vast amounts of chicken/turkey/pork - i learned that painful lesson a year ago when I made the switch to paleo.

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on October 15, 2013
at 07:27 PM

I have not done anything in this area, but certainly sardines, canned tuna, salmon are good protein sources. Raise chickens ?

2c3f71479664bd50ae5b28794e1b1a66

(20)

on October 15, 2013
at 11:56 PM

I'm out in the country and can hear the coyotes @ night. Setting up proper environment and maintenance of such for animals is a bit pricey. Though I have thought of goats rather than chickens. I also live near the lake, all my fish is fresh/fresh frozen so never look for tuna/salmon when I have a freezer of it. I'll have to start watching for sales on tuna/salmon.

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