8

votes

Scrambled Eggs, Hard Boiled Eggs, Sunny Side Up Eggs, etc... And Their Nutrients

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 29, 2012 at 1:22 AM

Fellow PaleoHacks,

Does the way you cook/prepare your eggs affect/alter the amount of nutrients you would ultimately end up consuming when you eat them?

For instance, is the nutrient density in hard boiled eggs higher/lower in comparison to the nutrient density in scrambled eggs? Etc...

If there is a difference, which prepared egg is the best to consume?

Thank you, and as always, all advice and suggestions are welcome!

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on March 07, 2013
at 02:05 PM

What about just cracking them into a muffin tin and baking until the whites are cooked ? http://thedomesticman.com/2013/01/15/shirred-eggs-with-sausage-and-spinach/

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 05, 2013
at 04:12 PM

@PrimalFit-D isn't that a soft boiled egg, and not a hard boiled egg?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 05, 2013
at 04:11 PM

The only time I caught salmonella was years and years ago when I was a lacto(no-ovo) vegetarian (if you're curious, it was from honeydew melon). I regularly consume raw eggs (3-5 eggs, 1-4 times a months) and have never had an issue.

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on November 29, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Yep, cooking destroys toxins and gentle cooking can help destroy toxins without damaging the food.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on November 29, 2012
at 04:35 PM

Salmonella is an issue with CAFO style eggs. It is a smaller issue with smaller farms and pasture style. But, it is a risk you can choose.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Correction: Argument*

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:32 PM

raydaw - On another note... my roommate who only cares about her caloric intake regardless of all the artificial sweeteners and chemicals keeps hounding me because I eat the yolk of the eggs. She makes the high cholesterol arguement. Any chance you have a good rebuttle I can pull on her? I would love to have a 'BAZINGA' moment.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:28 PM

raydawg - Thanks for your thorough response! So, you would say the chance of salmonela poisening is little to none when consuming raw eggs? Note... I have never consumed a completely raw egg before. I have consumed the yolk runny, but never raw.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 01:50 PM

UncleLongHair - What do you think about hard boiling eggs, but not to the point where the yolk is completely cooked? For instance, when I hard boil my eggs at times I stop cooking them when the yolk is still runny. Would that protect the yolk from complete degradation of its quality?

20203f15287a14924c714eb68a34ce6c

(596)

on November 29, 2012
at 09:44 AM

Aswell as improve nutriente absorption. Cooking REALLy made us human, HAHAA

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 02:09 AM

CD - Thanks for your input. I typically hard boil my eggs because it is quicker for me. When I scramble my eggs I do not add any milk. I will usually cook them in Kerrygold butter or leftover bacon fat. I can't say I have ever consumed a straight raw egg yolk before though.

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11 Answers

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5
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:12 PM

I tend to cook only the whites to disable the avidin, keeping the yolks as close to raw as possible. The yolks are where the nutrients are. The whites are just a lame source of protein that tends to be an issue without the nutrients. Sometimes I discard most of the whites.

It's funny how in the SAD they're told to eat just the whites because of fear of exogenous cholesterol, when the whites by themselves can deplete B12, folate, etc. which are found guess where? The yolks! I even have the yolks raw sometimes. I just crack open an egg, separate it in my hand over the trash can and let the white drip down, and then down the hatch it goes. Tastes very good - no different than undercooked yolks.

A few times a week I put about 4 lightly cooked eggs in with my lunch which also contains 4 rashers of bacon, or two bison burger patties (or both), and sometimes I fry up tomato slices in the left over grassfed butter I used to cook the eggs in (or bacon grease).

But if you scramble the eggs or cook them thoroughly, which SADders do because they fear salmonela, it oxidizes what little cholesterol is in the yolk, and oxidized cholesterol is not exactly safe. Of course, it's possible to get salmonela from eggs laid by pastured/organic fed/well treated chickens - the same way that it's possible to get hit by lightening. But your odds of getting bit by this is higher from CAFO eggs, so choose wisely.

So SAD advice is the advice you'd want to take if you want to get sick.

At our house, a dozen hard boiled eggs last minutes. Everyone consumes them and wants more. I prefer them more on the raw yolk side as mentioned above, but do enjoy them hard boiled too. Topics include: A1, red horseradish, tabasco sauce, red cabbage kraut w/beets, or just seasalt.

If you're going to eat lots of saturated fats, and every paleo dieter should, you'll want to either eat plenty of liver or eggs for the choline which your liver will need to process the fat. (Full disclose: I had my gallbladder removed, yet I get plenty of fat via digestive enzymes - don't let your doctor tell you that you can't eat fat, it's just not true.)

Now what should I do with the whites? Not even the cat wants to eat them? :)

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:28 PM

raydawg - Thanks for your thorough response! So, you would say the chance of salmonela poisening is little to none when consuming raw eggs? Note... I have never consumed a completely raw egg before. I have consumed the yolk runny, but never raw.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:33 PM

Correction: Argument*

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:32 PM

raydaw - On another note... my roommate who only cares about her caloric intake regardless of all the artificial sweeteners and chemicals keeps hounding me because I eat the yolk of the eggs. She makes the high cholesterol arguement. Any chance you have a good rebuttle I can pull on her? I would love to have a 'BAZINGA' moment.

4
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on November 29, 2012
at 01:42 PM

I have read different reports, but just intuitively I think that hard-cooked eggs are not as good for you as other preparations that leave the yolk soft or runny. In a hard-cooked egg the yolk takes on a chalky texture and I think this must degrade the quality of the fats, as they solidify just like trans fats.

I have also read that raw egg yolks are easily digested (long-shot risks of salmonella aside), but that egg whites aren't necessarily.

So I think the ideal way to cook eggs is to fry them in good butter "over easy", so that the whites are fully cooked but the yolks are runny.

Another option is to scramble them but without cooking them too much, I stir them constantly while they're cooking and take them off the heat when they're not quite done, then they firm up on the plate.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 01:50 PM

UncleLongHair - What do you think about hard boiling eggs, but not to the point where the yolk is completely cooked? For instance, when I hard boil my eggs at times I stop cooking them when the yolk is still runny. Would that protect the yolk from complete degradation of its quality?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 05, 2013
at 04:12 PM

@PrimalFit-D isn't that a soft boiled egg, and not a hard boiled egg?

4
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 29, 2012
at 01:55 AM

The difference is based on whether you add stuff to them.

Hard boiled eggs will be just the egg

Scrambled eggs might have milk added to it, so that changes the nutrient profile

Or they could be cooked in butter or coconut oil which woudl change the nutrient profile.

but as far as I know a raw egg yolk has the same nutrient profile of a cooked egg yolk.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on November 29, 2012
at 02:09 AM

CD - Thanks for your input. I typically hard boil my eggs because it is quicker for me. When I scramble my eggs I do not add any milk. I will usually cook them in Kerrygold butter or leftover bacon fat. I can't say I have ever consumed a straight raw egg yolk before though.

2
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on November 29, 2012
at 10:10 AM

For Chris Masterjohn raw egg yolks are a better than cooked in terms of nutrients/nutrient absobrtion (I don't know the nuances)... Whites raw are not so good...) http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/Egg_Yolk.html

Also - this might be of itnerst -http://paleohacks.com/questions/57581/egg-yolks-and-oxidized-cholesterol#axzz2DbacOHOs

As for what is 'best', depends on context, as always! :)

2
23a240b30b8622fed011ccbd4054fac2

(489)

on November 29, 2012
at 03:39 AM

I've always wondered this too. And a runny egg yolk vs a cooked one ... would those two vary in terms of digestibility?

2
Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on November 29, 2012
at 02:51 AM

I don't think the nutrients will be much different, although there is some thought it's better to use gentle cooking in water (poached) to reduce possible PUFA damage.

20203f15287a14924c714eb68a34ce6c

(596)

on November 29, 2012
at 09:44 AM

Aswell as improve nutriente absorption. Cooking REALLy made us human, HAHAA

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on November 29, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Yep, cooking destroys toxins and gentle cooking can help destroy toxins without damaging the food.

1
43873f3cea4f22f91653b0f5ec7ab9d9

(401)

on March 05, 2013
at 04:02 PM

I was about to post a similar question, so I figured I'd just bump this one instead...

Any other opinions on what's the best way to cook eggs in order to get the most nutrients?

I usually scramble my eggs, but I wonder if that's destroying too many nutrients?

What about whisking the eggs, pouring them into a muffin pan, and baking at 350F for 20 minutes? (http://paleospirit.com/2012/basic-paleo-egg-muffins/)

I figure sunny side up with a runny yolk is good- but I get concerned about whether I've cooked the whites enough (undercooked whites have avidin which reduce biotin).

Also, with sunny side up eggs, I feel like I'm not eating 100% of the yolk, since there's always some residue left on the plate. Should I just lick it up? I don't want to leave nutrients on the plate! Obviously I can't use bread to soak it up.

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on March 07, 2013
at 02:05 PM

What about just cracking them into a muffin tin and baking until the whites are cooked ? http://thedomesticman.com/2013/01/15/shirred-eggs-with-sausage-and-spinach/

1
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on November 29, 2012
at 04:36 PM

Basically, cooking the yolk will oxidize some of the nutrients. However, unless you are cooking at extremely high temperatures and then spraying the yolk to powder it, you are fine with it.

I tend to do over medium eggs (one flip, yolk still runny), but as long as I am eating eggs, I am good.

1
76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on November 29, 2012
at 01:31 PM

I've read in the past that heat damages proteins and cholesterol. I've not looked into the science behind it, but if that is so, you may not get as much -- nutritionally speaking -- from a hard boiled egg as you would from sunny side up or raw.

0
3dee689d6b9fdb629d1734a288a5cedc

on April 10, 2013
at 06:53 AM

Can tell me why are you still cooking separate sunny side ups?

0
46cae7f1e595abdc1202bc64a48334d9

on November 29, 2012
at 12:31 PM

Wouldn't salmonella be an issue with raw eggs? Am I missing something?

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on November 29, 2012
at 04:35 PM

Salmonella is an issue with CAFO style eggs. It is a smaller issue with smaller farms and pasture style. But, it is a risk you can choose.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 05, 2013
at 04:11 PM

The only time I caught salmonella was years and years ago when I was a lacto(no-ovo) vegetarian (if you're curious, it was from honeydew melon). I regularly consume raw eggs (3-5 eggs, 1-4 times a months) and have never had an issue.

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