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Plastic Egg Carton Bacteria Danger?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 14, 2013 at 11:00 PM

Normally I have put my hard boil eggs after cooled back into the carton unpeeled and then peel right before eating. However I've been experimenting with different methods for easier peeling and one of them is to peel right after cooking (which does seem to help btw). Well this morning I made a few extra beyond what I needed for breakfast, peeled them all, and put about 6 back in the clear plastic carton and into the fridge. Should I be worried at all that the carton could contain some bacteria or other baddies that I put my newly cooked and peeled eggs in?

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 15, 2013
at 01:46 AM

Most definitely second the glass container. (Glass containers are excellent for storage over plastic for plastics' leaching effects, anyway.)

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2 Answers

1
1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

on August 15, 2013
at 01:51 AM

Salmonella is most commonly contracted from bacteria on raw, unwashed eggshells (especially those with the bloom, although these are a wonderfully natural freshness preserver) and chicken poo(faeces) transferring. Egg cartons might conceivably contain these bacteria.

That might be a worry especially if the eggs were recently in the egg carton uncoooked.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on August 15, 2013
at 12:16 AM

For peeled eggs perhaps. Why not leave the shells on until you're ready to use them? They stay fresher that way. I always store peeled eggs in a clean glass container.

1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

(529)

on August 15, 2013
at 01:46 AM

Most definitely second the glass container. (Glass containers are excellent for storage over plastic for plastics' leaching effects, anyway.)

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