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pasture raised eggs for $7.5 a dozen?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 11, 2011 at 3:51 AM

i discovered vital farms pasture raised eggs in whole foods today. but at $7.5 a dozen they seem expensive. do you think it is worth it? these videos of vital farms look amazing

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=vital+farms&aq=f

D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

(1453)

on April 07, 2012
at 02:46 PM

What, are they pastured on the lawn of the Ritz??

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on April 07, 2012
at 02:41 PM

We sell our eggs for $5 a dozen b/c their heritage. Free range goes usually for $4. Unless they are beautiful, rare heritage eggs, I think that is too pricy.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 20, 2012
at 05:25 PM

I've gotten those same eggs for far less than $7.50/doz, and I live in the DC metro area. That price sounds ridiculous, even for WF.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 20, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Welcome Lisa! That's great information. I'm going to try freezing some eggs.

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 15, 2011
at 09:05 PM

What would be the proper/non-offensive wording when asking a farmer details about the diets of pastured chickens? What would be the key points to include in order to get the best quality eggs? (no soy, no corn, no antibiotics, no hormones, etc?)

5489f67c05ca5fc68f2b984e48b6da5e

on February 13, 2011
at 01:11 AM

I'm in Indianapolis. The links I gave were for Texas, because that's where I assumed kevin lived. On second that, that's where vital farms is located. I didn't know they, for example, sold eggs in NY. Try this, and click your state: http://www.eatwild.com/products/index.html

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 13, 2011
at 12:16 AM

What city are you in Justin? Eatwild is still a maze to me.

918ecd2369c4e8cd6a2d66846c20137c

(285)

on February 12, 2011
at 10:03 PM

Re: diet of pastured chickens - AFAIK, even chickens that are pasture-raised, free-ranging foragers are still always supplemented with a fair amt of grain in their diet. For instance, Joel Salatin of Omnivores Dilemma fame says his foraging broilers get only 20% from grass, bugs, worms, grubs – the rest from corn, toasted soybean, & kelp. I think his hens eat more grass, bugs, etc, but still get > 60% from grains, legumes, etc.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 11, 2011
at 06:57 PM

Oh...I see! Lol...from the price, I thought they must be feeding them gold nuggets or something.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on February 11, 2011
at 12:19 PM

I pay $4 for the convenience of getting them alongside grassfed steak, pastured pork, raw dairy and more... And I think it's a little high. I could pay $3 if o wanted to make separate trips. Eatwild is the GOTO resource for food.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 11, 2011
at 09:06 AM

I live in texas, so it might be a transportation thing, because I get them for 4 dollars/dozen.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 11, 2011
at 05:00 AM

That sounds like highway robbery to me, no matter what they're feeding them.

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19 Answers

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4
34a367e60db77270bd7096dc04270fdc

(4171)

on February 11, 2011
at 04:06 AM

I pay $4.99 per flat(20 eggs) for local pasture raised eggs in the Orlando, FL area. $7.5 is pricey but if that is the only game in town, I'd still buy them. Eggs are great and we eat a lot of them.

4
C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

on February 11, 2011
at 01:28 PM

Look on your local Craigslist under farm and garden. People sometimes offer their pasture raised eggs that way. I even found two duck egg suppliers.

3
341a20d2a76adb0aaf3a92d5727f3a61

(60)

on February 16, 2011
at 05:23 PM

I pay $6 for a dozen pastured eggs here in Portland, OR. So, while $7.5 seems a bit high, it's still a super cheap food at 62 cents per egg. What other food gives you so much excellent nutrition for so little?

2
Cb2415c2aef964ab499a09dc92ae7e01

(783)

on February 12, 2011
at 10:34 PM

For what it is worth, pastured eggs cost $8/dzn in San Francisco. I used to buy them and they were fantastic, but I'm more budget conscious these days. At another market, non pastured but still local family farm eggs run $5 for 30.

1
Fb96f7eeaaf4c0a44605434e39e6269f

on March 20, 2012
at 04:22 PM

I live outside Houston. At Farmer's Markets I've seen them $4, $5, even $6 a dozen depending on availability.

But it wasn't too difficult to find people in the area who raise chickens for fun and have a glut of eggs. The ladies I found will deliver a dozen for $2 or $3. There's a group of us where I work who order every week.

Great suggestion about buying in bulk. If the ick factor isn't too strong for you, just brushing the dirt off the eggs (instead of washing them with soap) and keeping the hen's anti-bacterial coating on the egg will help them last at least 6 weeks. I refrigerate, but supposedly you don't have to.

If you find a good source to buy in bulk you can freeze them. I use small containers or freezer-style ziploc bags and write the number on the outside. You can scramble them up first or just break the yolk a little. If you try to freeze the yolk separately, it gets weirdly gummy. Yes, this freezing probably causes some kind of loss of nutrients, but it was certainly wonderful to have eggs when the hens weren't laying.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 20, 2012
at 04:53 PM

Welcome Lisa! That's great information. I'm going to try freezing some eggs.

1
15e684f6f716f88c99f641098a6e06ca

(922)

on February 13, 2011
at 04:28 AM

here in westchester ny my best case scenario is pastured (but also supplemented with some grain) for $4.50 a dozen at the local farmer's market but there's a huge caveat on that. the farm that provides it had a chicken shortage last year due to a fox problem and now with the snow and ice we've had they're not getting many eggs so it's been a big crapshoot on whether they'll have eggs at all each week.

another poultry farm shows up at the indoor market and has good-tasting "free roaming" eggs for the same price but they're always well stocked. so on a hunch this morning i asked how the winter is impacting their farm and the lady tells me the chickens are all kept in a large heated barn.... so i guess they're free-roaming is confined to an indoor space. they don't get any bugs, just grain. this is a bummer because i've been buying these eggs for a month with my usual supplier out. i will probably continue to do so because they seem like high quality and i don't have another strong option... whole foods is the only other local source for pastured eggs and it is a schlep and overpriced - i believe about $7/dozen.

1
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on February 12, 2011
at 10:49 PM

That price is insanely high. Go to this site http://www.localharvest.org/ and search for farms with pastured eggs in your area. Also check for local farmers markets. Even in the DC area I don't pay more than $4/doz for pastured chicken eggs.

1
5489f67c05ca5fc68f2b984e48b6da5e

on February 11, 2011
at 04:12 AM

I get mine for $3.50 per dozen. There might be better options in your area.

http://www.eatwild.com/products/index.html

If you travel to any state's webpage, that's the page for specific farms in that state. To find things like grocery stores, there'll be a link to the right of the Google Map that says Go "Beyond the Farm"

5489f67c05ca5fc68f2b984e48b6da5e

on February 13, 2011
at 01:11 AM

I'm in Indianapolis. The links I gave were for Texas, because that's where I assumed kevin lived. On second that, that's where vital farms is located. I didn't know they, for example, sold eggs in NY. Try this, and click your state: http://www.eatwild.com/products/index.html

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on February 11, 2011
at 12:19 PM

I pay $4 for the convenience of getting them alongside grassfed steak, pastured pork, raw dairy and more... And I think it's a little high. I could pay $3 if o wanted to make separate trips. Eatwild is the GOTO resource for food.

902a7cd8f96bbc917a04e92b1f49dbd7

(787)

on February 13, 2011
at 12:16 AM

What city are you in Justin? Eatwild is still a maze to me.

0
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 07, 2012
at 11:32 AM

Well, in Switzerland that's par for the course. I pay 60 cents an egg, so it's $7.20 a dozen. That's pastured, but not organic. Organic is even more expensive. But then it's Switzerland, and everything here is gold plated.

0
231bc0b188a69047603962f4a06d74b7

on April 07, 2012
at 07:42 AM

For awhile wholefoods chicgaoland area, sell them for 8.00 a dozen and 5.99 half dozen! Ridiculous! I do like them but the price insults me. For goodness sake, are they golden chickens or what? They lost most of my business. I used ti buy 4 doz a month, now I buy maybe 1 doz every other month. I buy other brands.

0
1ab7ccb9520dddd0777db88e74ca0bed

on March 20, 2012
at 05:21 PM

I get them for $3 a dozen in Houston. $7.50 is insane.

0
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on February 12, 2011
at 10:07 PM

No way. They offer them for 6 dollars at my whole foods, but the yolks are paler than even the generic omega 3 ones. I get pastured eggs with orange yolks for 4 dollars/dozen.

0
918ecd2369c4e8cd6a2d66846c20137c

on February 12, 2011
at 10:02 PM

Here is another data point:

In North-central and northeast PA, I pay $2 when I buy direct from the farm where I also get all my pastured meat from. 95% of this farm's business is from selling sides of pastured meat - the eggs are just a sideline, which is likely why the price is so low.

There are two other farms I buy from that are primarily raising just poultry and eggs and these farms charge more: $3.00-$4.00. I also sometimes buy at farmers markets and usually pay ~$3.50 - $4.00

I like buying directly from a farm because then you can be confident re the living conditions and diet of the hens.

0
F53a74de3f8df19a114c5ac702af2b12

on February 11, 2011
at 05:39 PM

THat price may not actually be high depending on what his cost for production is. My farmer and my WAPF affiliates generally believe that eggs should be around $5-6 per dozen but farmers have to remain competitive so they lower then price to move more units.

0
892d177f50b16f118152219229870e4e

(776)

on February 11, 2011
at 05:57 AM

I pay 3.50 a dozen for pastured eggs here in NYC,which is the cheapest I have found so far.

I can't think of many(if any)places here in the US with pricier food,so my best suggestion would be to look elsewhere. Perhaps a local farm or farmer's market ?

0
E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

on February 11, 2011
at 04:33 AM

I'd vote for finding a local farmer or health food store if you can find one. Eggs keep forever refrigerated, so if you can't find one near by, you can buy in bulk to reduce the need for driving out of your way.

That said, if you find money easier to come by than time, or there really isn't a local supplier of pastured eggs, then I'd go for it. In my area (central PA) I pay between $2.50 and $3.50 per dozen for truly pastured eggs, or $1 dozen for pastured eggs that are supplemented with commercial grain from a friend who's a farmer.

As for whether the price is fair or not- supply and demand. It's certainly an exorbitant price for where I live, but for where you live, it might be fair.

0
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 11, 2011
at 04:09 AM

Vital farm's chickens only get 1/3 of their food from pasture, according to a sign posted at my whole foods in NYC. That said, if you can afford it, they still might be the best egg available to you.

918ecd2369c4e8cd6a2d66846c20137c

(285)

on February 12, 2011
at 10:03 PM

Re: diet of pastured chickens - AFAIK, even chickens that are pasture-raised, free-ranging foragers are still always supplemented with a fair amt of grain in their diet. For instance, Joel Salatin of Omnivores Dilemma fame says his foraging broilers get only 20% from grass, bugs, worms, grubs – the rest from corn, toasted soybean, & kelp. I think his hens eat more grass, bugs, etc, but still get > 60% from grains, legumes, etc.

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 15, 2011
at 09:05 PM

What would be the proper/non-offensive wording when asking a farmer details about the diets of pastured chickens? What would be the key points to include in order to get the best quality eggs? (no soy, no corn, no antibiotics, no hormones, etc?)

0
83f7f1168eb05422351aceaca9ccc22d

on February 11, 2011
at 04:07 AM

Um heeeeell no... 7.50 should get you at least 3 dozen... Go local, you will not be sorry

-2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 16, 2011
at 06:22 AM

saying that the word "pastured" is indicative of quality, is like believing that a Yugo is the same as a Rolls Royce, because they both have 4 wheels.

If hens are truly free-range pastured to the point where greens and insects are a plurality of dietary calories, most of the eggs would become snake or racoon food at some point before or after hatching.

City people should not even dream of receiving the best available, healthiest foods. And certainly not at bargain prices.

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