4

votes

Mutant double-yolk eggs: safe to eat? (more total yolk than singles of same size egg)?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 27, 2013 at 12:48 PM

I was shocked to see a dozen "double-yolk" eggs at the Reading Terminal Market here in Philadelphia.

Were these chickens raised next to a nuclear power plant or something?

How did they get a dozen of these mutant ninja eggs?

I'm actually trying to avoid egg whites during a diet elimination so I was excited to see these.

Is there more total yolk than a regular egg of the same size? In other words, is it the same total yolk, just partitioned into two half sized yolks? If that's the case, it doesn't seem helpful if I'm just going to blend the yolks into a custard.

Thoughts?

Thanks, Mike

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 28, 2013
at 03:04 AM

Thank you very much! I did not know!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 09:58 PM

Here's some good info on molting: http://www.grit.com/the-chicken-chick/molting-what-is-it--how-to-help-chickens-get-through-it.aspx At sundown, mine go in for the night on their own. If you have a rooster, he will usually call them in. I lock mine up at night because we live in a semi-rural neighborhood where there are opossums and foxes that loooooove chickens. My dogs don't go out to the area where the chickens are (one has a major hunting instinct), so predators aren't kept away.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 08:10 PM

If I let them run free, will they come back on their own, or do I have to chase them down?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 08:10 PM

I feel bad for those baby toads... oh, well. How often do chickens molt? I was thinking of getting some chickens, but I am afraid they are going to get sick or something.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 08:09 PM

VB, it depends on the breed. Some Spring chickens will have their first molt in Fall and others will not molt until up to 18 months. Some hens will cease egg laying while they molt (regrowing feathers takes a lot of energy), some will slow, and others will power through it and never skip an egg.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 06:12 PM

That's what I would guess. Eggs will taste different based on the feed. Bad feed = funky flavor. I find true free range eggs taste the best, when chickens are allowed to do what chickens do and eat grass, seeds, bugs, worms, etc. Mine gorge themselves on plant scraps and bugs, but I don't have much range for them to roam, so I supplement with soy-free organic feed. The back of my property is mostly concrete, so they eat what weeds sprout up. There is a sump behind my house with lots of bull frogs, toads, and bugs, so they get what wanders into their enclosure. Chickens love baby toads!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:50 PM

I never tried the normal ones from her. Maybe they taste bad as well?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:12 PM

Damn it..."heavy layers" not breeders.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:11 PM

Don't know what your farmer feeds his hens, but they shouldn't taste any different than other eggs from him.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:06 PM

My gut reaction was they might not be as fresh if they had to be handled separately and segregated and marketed differently.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:03 PM

Joni, how often do chickens molt? When does it happen?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:58 PM

*It, not I.....

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:43 PM

Whenever we get a double-yolk egg, it is typically more of an oblong shape, though that alone doesn't indicate that it is a double-yolk. My experience is that each yolk is smaller than an average yolk, though combined, there may be slightly more than a single-yolk egg. We get excited about double-yolks, but we're geeky and use it as a lesson during homeschooling.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:40 PM

I does not mean than "one yolk was slow going through the ovuduct." Two ovum can be released at once, just as in humans.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:38 PM

Not true at all. In the states, hens are not fed hormones. Though double yolks typically come from pullets just beginning the egg-laying process, it can happen in what are referred to as "heavy breeders." It is no more abnormal than a human having twins without the use of medical intervention. No hormone imbalance involved, just two ovum released.

753e1b824fbe0b11c797a244b1a4c7e3

(369)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:14 PM

Egg Twins (I realized it's not really the case, but that's what we called that) I haven't had those since I was a kid!! Every now and then when my mom fried up some eggs and bacon for "Brinner" (Breakfast for dinner), we'd get one with a double yolk... just like you sometimes get one that is not good. You can eat them! Or at least, we did and we're all still here :-) We'd actually fight over who got that one.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:01 PM

Any support to the statement regarding chickens being given hormones for egg production? Double yolks aren't desirable in commercial layers, they're tossed in fact.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 27, 2013
at 03:52 PM

We buy only pastured eggs and to save money we often but the "crazy eggs". These are the eggs that tend to run between sizes or have odd looking shells or colors. Our favorite is when the pack includes a long, skinny egg, because sometimes that's a double yolk. We consider that a bonus. I'd be leery of an egg production farm that manages to cultivate double yolked eggs, but when it occurs naturally its a fun treat.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

best answer

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 27, 2013
at 02:17 PM

Double-yolks are normal for young chickens. To get a dozen though, they must have a pretty big operation or they've been saving them for a quite a while! They're just normal eggs, but 2 yolks. Not worth paying extra for. In fact, it sort of takes away from the pleasant surprise of cracking a double yolker into a pan.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:06 PM

My gut reaction was they might not be as fresh if they had to be handled separately and segregated and marketed differently.

1
9beda76f4e91faedc8fa70ecdc01251e

(298)

on February 27, 2013
at 03:46 PM

We have raised laying hens, and when they start laying as young hens, or when they resume laying after molting, they can lay eggs with double yolks. It just means the one yolk was slow going through the oviduct and the next day's yolk caught up with it and they were both encased in the shell. Nothing wrong with it, and it shouldn't taste any different. Just fun to find!

Most egg operations weed these out, so you don't find them in most cartons.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:40 PM

I does not mean than "one yolk was slow going through the ovuduct." Two ovum can be released at once, just as in humans.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 08:09 PM

VB, it depends on the breed. Some Spring chickens will have their first molt in Fall and others will not molt until up to 18 months. Some hens will cease egg laying while they molt (regrowing feathers takes a lot of energy), some will slow, and others will power through it and never skip an egg.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 27, 2013
at 03:52 PM

We buy only pastured eggs and to save money we often but the "crazy eggs". These are the eggs that tend to run between sizes or have odd looking shells or colors. Our favorite is when the pack includes a long, skinny egg, because sometimes that's a double yolk. We consider that a bonus. I'd be leery of an egg production farm that manages to cultivate double yolked eggs, but when it occurs naturally its a fun treat.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:58 PM

*It, not I.....

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:03 PM

Joni, how often do chickens molt? When does it happen?

1
39311794c054f89a226f33e1afd08721

on February 27, 2013
at 01:42 PM

I haven't seen a double yolk since we knew people who raised chickens free-range. It's odd that it was a whole dozen, but they may have got that from a single chicken and just collected over time or from a closely related group of chickens. I don't know about the yolk percentages, I haven't seen them in a long time, but unless they were much bigger than normal eggs, if there were a difference in yolk percentage, I'd guess less yolk because of the geometry involved. Though my guess is nature would provide twins with the same percentages of the things they need so there'd be no difference.

0
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 02:10 PM

I actually tried them (the farmer I know sells double yolked ones separately). I did not like them - they do not taste good compared to the free range ones. Double yolked were not free range.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 06:12 PM

That's what I would guess. Eggs will taste different based on the feed. Bad feed = funky flavor. I find true free range eggs taste the best, when chickens are allowed to do what chickens do and eat grass, seeds, bugs, worms, etc. Mine gorge themselves on plant scraps and bugs, but I don't have much range for them to roam, so I supplement with soy-free organic feed. The back of my property is mostly concrete, so they eat what weeds sprout up. There is a sump behind my house with lots of bull frogs, toads, and bugs, so they get what wanders into their enclosure. Chickens love baby toads!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 08:10 PM

I feel bad for those baby toads... oh, well. How often do chickens molt? I was thinking of getting some chickens, but I am afraid they are going to get sick or something.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:11 PM

Don't know what your farmer feeds his hens, but they shouldn't taste any different than other eggs from him.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 08:10 PM

If I let them run free, will they come back on their own, or do I have to chase them down?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 09:58 PM

Here's some good info on molting: http://www.grit.com/the-chicken-chick/molting-what-is-it--how-to-help-chickens-get-through-it.aspx At sundown, mine go in for the night on their own. If you have a rooster, he will usually call them in. I lock mine up at night because we live in a semi-rural neighborhood where there are opossums and foxes that loooooove chickens. My dogs don't go out to the area where the chickens are (one has a major hunting instinct), so predators aren't kept away.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:50 PM

I never tried the normal ones from her. Maybe they taste bad as well?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 28, 2013
at 03:04 AM

Thank you very much! I did not know!

0
717ac8a668eec6c024186d46ff30b3c3

(105)

on February 27, 2013
at 01:08 PM

Double-yolk producing chickens are hormonally unbalanced young chickens usually at the start of their egg-production period and one expects it naturally disappears after some time. However, at some operations I suspect this abnormality is pro-longed by giving hormonal drugs to the hens since double-yolk eggs are more expensive than the normal ones. For myself, I do not eat such eggs.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:12 PM

Damn it..."heavy layers" not breeders.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:38 PM

Not true at all. In the states, hens are not fed hormones. Though double yolks typically come from pullets just beginning the egg-laying process, it can happen in what are referred to as "heavy breeders." It is no more abnormal than a human having twins without the use of medical intervention. No hormone imbalance involved, just two ovum released.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 27, 2013
at 04:01 PM

Any support to the statement regarding chickens being given hormones for egg production? Double yolks aren't desirable in commercial layers, they're tossed in fact.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!