3

votes

How many eggs is too many?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 16, 2012 at 4:51 AM

I've been eating a lot of omlettes for convenience, and I was wondering if having 6-10 per day is too many?

I am sensitive to the whites, but seem to do fine with the whole egg. This isn't a permanent thing, but when travelling to visit family, eggs are an easy protein.

Thoughts?

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 30, 2012
at 03:55 PM

A very thoughtful answer

60df87f218e4239986b927a6ff41515b

on March 16, 2012
at 01:52 PM

I don't know if it's because it's spring time, but I have been craving eggs and eating 4 to 5 every morning. I don't usually crave egge that much!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on March 16, 2012
at 12:45 PM

How many times do I have to answer this question? The correct answer is 51 eggs in one hour. 50 is the limit.

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6 Answers

6
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 16, 2012
at 11:47 AM

If you find yourself pressing your lips to the cloaca of a live chicken to sate your egg lust, you may have a problem.

Until then, I'd say 6 a day is fine, but 10 is pushing it. Frankly, I require more variety than that to be happy. I do drink down 3 a day, everyday, as is now.

3
B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on March 16, 2012
at 01:41 PM

Ashley,

I don't think its anything to be worried about, since you say this isn't a permanent thing. In fact, before the industrial revolution, when we didn't have all sorts of food, seasonal and not, at arm's reach all year round, people would rely on whatever was available, and made the most of it.

Eggs are definitely a great choice; an egg is a complete source of nutrition, it provides all the nutrients needed for the embryo to develop. Eggs are a great source of choline, selenium, iodine, B vitamins, protein - as you remarked, molybdenum, phosphorus, vitamin B5, vitamin B12 and vitamin D; as well as antioxidant carotenoids (lutein & zeaxanthin) pastured eggs will have a better nutritional profile, with a more favourable omega 3:6 ratio, and more vitamin D since they have more access to the outdoors; they have a greater concentration of antioxidants (and hence grass-fed eggs usually have brighter coloured yolks).

Eggs per se are not in any way a problem - the only issue is the avidin in the white, but as long as you cook it, you neutralise that. You could even stick to the yolks alone if you wanted, they have all the nutrition in the egg (the white is really just protein). Of course, if you continued this indefinitely, it could be an issue just as it would be in the case of restricting your protein intake to any one source, be it eggs or beef or anything else, especially if you don't have a constant supply of pastured eggs.

Besides, its not like eggs are the one and only thing you eat. Choose the best eggs you can get, preferably pastured, if not, organic and free-range; do the best with what you have; omelettes are also a great vehicle for nutritious fillings, such as vegetables, even fruit (flaugnarde, anyone?), as well as meat, fish, and cheeses, and you'll be getting adequate nutrition; especially since you don't plan to do this forever: all foods, really, are seasonal; eggs are probably at their best in spring and summer when they will naturally have better nutritional profiles, and variety is always the best way to get maximum nutrients.

Keep well!

Milla

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 30, 2012
at 03:55 PM

A very thoughtful answer

3
3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

on March 16, 2012
at 05:40 AM

When your body tells you don't eat more that day.

60df87f218e4239986b927a6ff41515b

on March 16, 2012
at 01:52 PM

I don't know if it's because it's spring time, but I have been craving eggs and eating 4 to 5 every morning. I don't usually crave egge that much!

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 16, 2012
at 05:39 AM

There are some answers in this thread:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/73804/28-eggs-in-a-week

0
23d8c5a65b69db66f745cd890a19510d

on March 16, 2012
at 01:10 PM

Another way to look at it might be to consider the time of year. I get pastured eggs from my local farmer's market, and I prefer eating more eggs in the spring and summer, when I know the chickens are outside getting plenty of sunshine, green grass, and bugs. I tend to eat less eggs in the winter, when the chickens are most likely eating more supplemental grain feed.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 16, 2012
at 05:09 AM

Short-term? No problem.

Long-term? Not so much.

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