6

votes

Hack my raw egg yolk sulfur farts?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 15, 2011 at 9:09 AM

While giving my wife the Dutch Oven is entertaining, I'm curious as to why a raw egg yolk would give me rancid sulfur farts but a soft boiled egg yolk would not?

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 14, 2012
at 03:43 PM

Haha great, Edward.

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on March 08, 2012
at 11:44 AM

Yeah, the flame is more blue.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3651)

on March 07, 2012
at 08:38 PM

If you light them, is the flame any different from cooked?

8838443ac82e9f98e4ae9daf80d50eb5

(896)

on January 23, 2012
at 05:22 AM

+1 for getting me to Google raw egg farts. Most surprisingly there's lots of forums that talk about raw egg farts. Heresva link that suggests eating more artichokes to neutralize the odor. http://www.poopreport.com/Doctor/Knowledgebase/smelly_farts.html

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

best answer

1
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on March 14, 2012
at 03:37 PM

Thanks for the responses. It was a calcium issue. Increasing my calcium completely eliminated the gas. Ray Peat strikes again.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on March 14, 2012
at 03:43 PM

Haha great, Edward.

1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 07, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Cooking increases digestibility of egg protein. My guess is that in raw yolks, more protein (specifically the sulfur containing amino acids cystine and methionine) available for gut flora equals more production of sulfide and methanethiol gas.

0
Ef69ca2d5434e470d44f7fa6b4cc1965

(86)

on March 07, 2012
at 08:07 PM

From Wikipedia: The gas released during a flatus event frequently has an unpleasant odor. For many years, this was thought to be due to skatole and indole, which are byproducts of the digestion of meat. However, gas chromatography testing in 1984 revealed that sulfur-containing compounds, such as methanethiol, hydrogen sulfide (rotten egg smell) and dimethyl sulfide, were also[2] responsible for the smell.[3]

Hence it is the hydrogen sulfide in eggs that produce this odor.

Egg proteins change when you heat them, beat them, or mix them with other ingredients. Understanding these changes can help you understand the roles that eggs play in cooking.

Proteins are made of long chains of amino acids. The proteins in an egg white are globular proteins, which means that the long protein molecule is twisted and folded and curled up into a more or less spherical shape. A variety of weak chemical bonds keep the protein curled up tight as it drifts placidly in the water that surrounds it.

When you apply heat, you agitate those placidly drifting egg-white proteins, bouncing them around. They slam into the surrounding water molecules; they bash into each other. All this bashing about breaks the weak bonds that kept the protein curled up. The egg proteins uncurl and bump into other proteins that have also uncurled. New chemical bonds form—but rather than binding the protein to itself, these bonds connect one protein to another.

After enough of this bashing and bonding, the solitary egg proteins are solitary no longer. They’ve formed a network of interconnected proteins. The water in which the proteins once floated is captured and held in the protein web. If you leave the eggs at a high temperature too long, too many bonds form and the egg white becomes rubbery.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!