1

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Hack my potential source of eggs

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 17, 2012 at 4:17 AM

I have been searching for a decent local-ish egg source since I go through tons of them and feel ethically and nutritionally compromised when I buy the battery eggs, and I feel fairly the same way when I buy the pricier "free range, omega-3" eggs since I know there is a lot of word-trickery going on with that. There are no good sources outside of 45 minutes away that have legit free-range eggs and they are pricey (especially factoring in gas to drive there).

I found a source nearby who responded to my inquiry about the hens' diet and lifestyle, stating that the hens are free to roam their fields and pasture around their barn except in poor weather (nest boxes in their barn), and that they are also fed kitchen/garden scraps such as green beans, potato peels, lettuce, tomatoes, kale, corn, sunflowers, and more. They also said that during the winter the hens get fed feed "specially mixed at the mill with cracked corn, soybean meal and vitamins," and that to do organic they'd have to up their cost per dozen to $5. Currently it's $2/dozen for extra-large eggs.

Worth it? Problems? Issues I should take note of? Keep searching for another source? They are about the same price as battery eggs at my local grocery store, so I feel like it's a great deal if I want something better without spending $5/dozen and making a long drive.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 11:10 PM

No hormones or antibiotics...this is a steal for $2/dozen...so I guess it's time to stock up!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 08:55 PM

@Lizzy555 that's a really cool article (from your link)! I thought the arsenic came from the fertilizer on the field, so I need to learn more. When I read that those folks became anemic from eating chicken 3-4 times a week I'm curious about the health status of my neighbors here on Delmarva who eat that factory farm chicken every day, many pride themselves of eating a whole chicken every day. I stopped eating chicken when I moved here, even organic I can't stomach anymore, but I'm always on the lookout for healthy chicken for my kitties.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on February 17, 2012
at 08:36 PM

Just ask. They'll know what you mean.

7c8e227dd8d5bdd77febfdebaa78dc13

(185)

on February 17, 2012
at 06:58 PM

reading the other comments about arsenic being in the non-organic feed. I think this should be another question you ask the farmer "are any additives added to your chicken feed?". Arsenic is a problem with mass production chickens where they pump them full of additives, hormones, and antibiotics. A small scale farmer can purchase non organic chicken feed without additives and hormones given to the large scale producers. Here's an article I read about a small farmer who wondered if he was feeding his chickens arsenic laced feed: http://traceymillerwellness.com/wellness/arsenic-and-chicken/

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:25 PM

That seller sounds like she knows what she is doing and I would probably trust her answers if you ask about the chicken feed. Hormones or steroids are not allowed in chicken feed by USDA regulations (and why it's hidious to claim that on the conventional chicken meat labels) but antibiotics are common in regular chicken feed (and thus never mentioned on the meat labels) and that's why it's important to ask if the feed is non-medicated and vegetarian because yeah well you know why. By the way I know many folks use chicken feed as cheap cat litter...:-(

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:06 PM

The seller said she has a group of people that typically buy during the warmer months, but that they're mostly at their vacation homes elsewhere, so she has a surplus. Re: euthanized pets winding up in pet food...I am passionate about this issue! If we had the space I'd be doing a raw meat diet with my cat, but for now I buy the highest quality canned food - her coat is gorgeous and she has never been sick. Thanks for the information - I really do appreciate it. I'm going to ask about medication/hormones to make sure, and hopefully I'll find a closer source of organic in the future.

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:03 PM

They should know where they're feed comes from and what is in it. If you have Amish near by check them out. They are not certified organic but raise their chickens free range and prepare their own feed from their own crop which is mostly organic.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 03:58 PM

Hmmm...not sure about hormones or antibiotics - didn't consider that. Is there a particular way to ask, or is that something they would be very aware of doing?

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 03:56 PM

That they seem to take care of the chickens was important to me, too. And yes, it would be a lot more $$$ to drive to get organic! Glad to hear about the pesticide issue. Thanks!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 02:27 PM

Oh I forgot to mention: organic might be concerning factor because of the arsenic in regular feed, even if it's non-medicated and vegetarian. The arsenic comes from the fertilizer on the corn/soy/wheat fields and shows up in chicken meat. So it probably will also show up in eggs. For all these reasons I personally now pay $6/dozen for local, free roaming, organic fed, multi-breed/colored eggs and try to limit my consumption closer to that what it would be if I depended on finding eggs in the wild.

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 17, 2012
at 08:02 AM

One day Blossom!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:33 AM

I wish! I have researched the prospect quite a bit, but it won't happen until DH is done with med school and we can settle somewhere permanently. Right now it's apartment living. :-(

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 17, 2012
at 04:29 AM

Have you got a big garden Blossom? You can't beat eggs from your own hens (so I hear!)

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4 Answers

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2
7c8e227dd8d5bdd77febfdebaa78dc13

on February 17, 2012
at 05:25 AM

wow, I would love to eat those eggs! I think $2 a dozen is a steal. They sound like they really take good care of their chickens, to me that's the most important part. Organic feed offers the same nutrition as non-organic feed, but I think a happy chicken that's able to run in grass under the sunshine offers way more of a nutritional punch than what that organic label will provide. Any pesticide residue from the non-organic feed is unlikely to show up in the eggs themselves, I wouldn't worry about it, and enjoy those eggs!

If you drove to get those organic eggs, you should also factor in the cost of gas and time. To me it wouldn't be worth it.

7c8e227dd8d5bdd77febfdebaa78dc13

(185)

on February 17, 2012
at 06:58 PM

reading the other comments about arsenic being in the non-organic feed. I think this should be another question you ask the farmer "are any additives added to your chicken feed?". Arsenic is a problem with mass production chickens where they pump them full of additives, hormones, and antibiotics. A small scale farmer can purchase non organic chicken feed without additives and hormones given to the large scale producers. Here's an article I read about a small farmer who wondered if he was feeding his chickens arsenic laced feed: http://traceymillerwellness.com/wellness/arsenic-and-chicken/

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 03:56 PM

That they seem to take care of the chickens was important to me, too. And yes, it would be a lot more $$$ to drive to get organic! Glad to hear about the pesticide issue. Thanks!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 08:55 PM

@Lizzy555 that's a really cool article (from your link)! I thought the arsenic came from the fertilizer on the field, so I need to learn more. When I read that those folks became anemic from eating chicken 3-4 times a week I'm curious about the health status of my neighbors here on Delmarva who eat that factory farm chicken every day, many pride themselves of eating a whole chicken every day. I stopped eating chicken when I moved here, even organic I can't stomach anymore, but I'm always on the lookout for healthy chicken for my kitties.

1
4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 01:54 PM

I'm surprised about the price of $2/dozen! I used to have a source exactly like that about a mile away and he said that price hardly covers the chicken feed but people around won't pay more for eggs, although I told him that they do, up to $6/dozen in the health food store 10 miles away. His hens no longer lay eggs and I don't know if he now has 15-20 pet hens for the next 10-15 years or whether his son turned them into soup. He himself told me he could never harm them since he would talk to them every day but his son was also the one who had to kill all but one of the "hens" that turned out roosters before they kill eachother. When you start your own chickens you buy live baby chicks and the so-called "sexers" at the hatchery aren't that accurate and a large part always turns out roosters. More than one rooster is like having more than one tomcat fighting over the same territory. Anyway...most important is that they are allowed to roam freely on grass and eat worms and eggs from other birds and insects next to their chicken feed. That the feed is organic is not as important as that it is non-medicated and vegetarian, although chickens are not vegetarians, but the so-called "meat meal" and "meat by-product" that goes into regular non-vegetarian feed comes from the rendering plants and contains downed animals and all dogs and cats including flea collar that were killed in this country's "shelters". Several people have investigated this subject thoroughly and the latest info I have is from Susan Thixton of "truthaboutpetfood" who was told by those rendering plants that more than 50% of that meat meal goes to poultry feed and the rest to pet food. Even if you don't care what happens to dogs and cats in this country you should care that the meat meal contains the poison those pets were killed with. Sorry for being so long but all this is something that I look more and more into these past years, being that I now live in "chicken country", Delmarva, that I see how "free range" chickens are raised, how I breath air full of antibiotic resistant bacteria every minute, see the chickens on the trucks and so forth. Trying to feed my cats and myself species appropriate and investigating thoroughly where all our food comes from and all the different factors to consider. Bottom line: those eggs of yours are a steal, important is that their feed is non-medicated and vegetarian, and that they roam on grass and trees and not on naked dirt in a small pen. Trees are very important for them psychologically and the grass for worms and insects and grass itself.

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:25 PM

That seller sounds like she knows what she is doing and I would probably trust her answers if you ask about the chicken feed. Hormones or steroids are not allowed in chicken feed by USDA regulations (and why it's hidious to claim that on the conventional chicken meat labels) but antibiotics are common in regular chicken feed (and thus never mentioned on the meat labels) and that's why it's important to ask if the feed is non-medicated and vegetarian because yeah well you know why. By the way I know many folks use chicken feed as cheap cat litter...:-(

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 02:27 PM

Oh I forgot to mention: organic might be concerning factor because of the arsenic in regular feed, even if it's non-medicated and vegetarian. The arsenic comes from the fertilizer on the corn/soy/wheat fields and shows up in chicken meat. So it probably will also show up in eggs. For all these reasons I personally now pay $6/dozen for local, free roaming, organic fed, multi-breed/colored eggs and try to limit my consumption closer to that what it would be if I depended on finding eggs in the wild.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:06 PM

The seller said she has a group of people that typically buy during the warmer months, but that they're mostly at their vacation homes elsewhere, so she has a surplus. Re: euthanized pets winding up in pet food...I am passionate about this issue! If we had the space I'd be doing a raw meat diet with my cat, but for now I buy the highest quality canned food - her coat is gorgeous and she has never been sick. Thanks for the information - I really do appreciate it. I'm going to ask about medication/hormones to make sure, and hopefully I'll find a closer source of organic in the future.

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:37 AM

What I do is buy the eggs and enjoy them. Should I find a better source than of course I switch.

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on February 17, 2012
at 03:24 PM

That is super cheap to me! We pay $4 a dozen for similarly-raised eggs. I think it's more important that they are hormone & antibiotic-free. Do you know?

When & if you can find a local source that doesn't feed GMO corn & soybeans you can switch.

Let this producer know your concerns and they may even choose to switch their feed. They don't need to get certified as organic, just improve the quality of their feed.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 11:10 PM

No hormones or antibiotics...this is a steal for $2/dozen...so I guess it's time to stock up!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on February 17, 2012
at 04:03 PM

They should know where they're feed comes from and what is in it. If you have Amish near by check them out. They are not certified organic but raise their chickens free range and prepare their own feed from their own crop which is mostly organic.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on February 17, 2012
at 03:58 PM

Hmmm...not sure about hormones or antibiotics - didn't consider that. Is there a particular way to ask, or is that something they would be very aware of doing?

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on February 17, 2012
at 08:36 PM

Just ask. They'll know what you mean.

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