2

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Eggs over easy?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 11, 2012 at 4:30 PM

Do you think it's safe to eat eggs over easy? My 2 year old loves 'dippy' eggs, but I'm concerned about salmonella. I've tried googling, but I find so much of the information is contradictory. Anyone know any reliable sources on the subject?

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 13, 2012
at 02:33 PM

Thanks GHarkness. There are some programable slow cookers where you can set the temperature, but I'm not sure how low the temperature would go. I'll also compare the price of buying a digital slow cooker vs a sous vide controller.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on March 11, 2012
at 09:17 PM

@PaleoGran, thanks for the gracious words. @Amanda, you may have a problem finding a slow cooker that will handle this level of accuracy in temperature. The only way I have found to do it is with a sous vide controller (google it). You then plug the slow cooker into the controller to achieve the correct results. Every slow cooker I know of will NOT achieve this level of accuracy without the additional controller, because they only have "high" and "low." Sometimes "keep warm," too but even that is too hot. The one we use is found at auberins.com. They are not easy to find :-)

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:52 PM

Thanks! We're actually in the market for a new slow cooker, so I'll look into getting one where we can control the temperature like that.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Thanks for correcting this. :) I appreciate it.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Agreed. Also, if your immune system is healthy, then you should have more resilience...

A4587cfef29863db612c43f89c202cc1

(2053)

on March 11, 2012
at 07:47 PM

I hope so. I'm eating 4 sunny side up eggs as I read this.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 11, 2012
at 06:59 PM

FYI I put raw egg yolks in my 2 year olds smoothies...only the eggs I get from my local source though.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 11, 2012
at 06:56 PM

http://www.foodrenegade.com/why-im-not-afraid-of-salmonella/

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:51 PM

Amanda, thanks! :) I'll put a thermometer in my broth or tea, and see it is 140 when I stir in the egg.

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:48 PM

I just found this: They can be inside the chicken before the egg is laid, so just washing eggs on the outside will NOT necessarily rid the egg of infection. If you like your eggs soft-boiled or over easy, you are throwing the dice. Only a small percentage of eggs are infected but there is no way of knowing ahead of time which ones they are. It is virtually impossible to culture each and every chicken and egg, so the consumer has to beware. Temperatures above 140 degrees will kill Salmonella but that doesn't necessarily mean the meat is done and edible. It depends on what you're eating.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:40 PM

Amanda, I've never had any trouble, but with children, I too would want a thermometer reading that was trustworthy. I often just stir an egg or a yolk into broth or tea. Hope what I found at the LC site is trustworthy.

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:37 PM

Interesting! That would be amazing if it's true! I was reading on one site that said it needed to be 160 to kill salmonella, but that was just one site... I'll start googling more to see if the 140 degrees is right. (I hope so!)

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5 Answers

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5
145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

on March 11, 2012
at 08:00 PM

Placing the eggs in a 142-degree water bath for, say, 5 minutes is NOT the answer. Let me explain: the bacteria is killed at 142 (actually 135) degrees, BUT it takes longer than 5 minutes for that temperature to reach the inside of the egg to kill the salmonella. Let me refer you to the egg pasteurization section of "A practical guide to Sous Vide Cooking."

Pasteurized in Shell Egg

While only 1 in 10,000???20,000 intact shell eggs contain hazardous levels of Salmonella enteritidis (McGee, 2004; Snyder, 2006), Grade A eggs were implicated in 82% of outbreaks between 1985 and 1991 (Mishu et al., 1994). Therefore, when working with highly susceptible or immune compromised populations, pasteurized eggs should always be used in dishes which call for raw eggs (e.g., chocolate mousses).

Place egg in a 135??F (57??C) water bath for at least 1 hour and 15 minutes (Schuman et al., 1997).

Pasteurized intact eggs can be stored and used just like raw eggs. While the properties of the egg yolk are unaffected, the egg white is milky compared to a raw egg. Whipping time is significantly longer for pasteurized eggs, but the final whip volume is nearly the same (Schuman et al., 1997).

emphasis added by me

My husband and I pasteurize our eggs using this method (using a sous vide controller attached to a small crock pot). If you don't have a sous vide, you might have a bit of a challenge getting the water temperature to stay constant for that period of time. There are some who use things like insulated containers, watching carefully the water temperature. All that is required is that the temperature be at 135 degrees for the stated period of time inside the egg. If the eggs are room temperature or cold, they will cool the water down considerably, from which it must recover, and THEN you start counting the time. It normally takes us 2-3 hours to bring the temperature up to the 135 degrees and hold it there for the requisite time period.

Now, how does this relate to your two-year-old? Well, children are definitely more susceptible to bad bacteria, and what you or I could easily throw off could seriously damage or kill a child. While it's unlikely that you will get an egg that has salmonella, we do know it happens, so consider how important it is to you. If you agree that it is seriously important, you will go to some extra trouble to make sure your 2-year-old eats bacteria-free eggs.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Thanks for correcting this. :) I appreciate it.

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:52 PM

Thanks! We're actually in the market for a new slow cooker, so I'll look into getting one where we can control the temperature like that.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on March 11, 2012
at 09:17 PM

@PaleoGran, thanks for the gracious words. @Amanda, you may have a problem finding a slow cooker that will handle this level of accuracy in temperature. The only way I have found to do it is with a sous vide controller (google it). You then plug the slow cooker into the controller to achieve the correct results. Every slow cooker I know of will NOT achieve this level of accuracy without the additional controller, because they only have "high" and "low." Sometimes "keep warm," too but even that is too hot. The one we use is found at auberins.com. They are not easy to find :-)

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 13, 2012
at 02:33 PM

Thanks GHarkness. There are some programable slow cookers where you can set the temperature, but I'm not sure how low the temperature would go. I'll also compare the price of buying a digital slow cooker vs a sous vide controller.

5
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:02 PM

Honestly, it depends on where you get your eggs. If you're buying commercial eggs, I wouldn't eat them raw or over easy. If you're getting pastured eggs from healthy, ethically raised chickens, these animals typically don't GET sick, and don't spread sickness through their eggs... I even eat the pastured eggs from our local farm raw, and use them to make nogs.

I grew up eating eggs raw, and right out of the chickens from a farm that would, by today's standards, be considered an 'ethical farmstead', and never was any the worse for the wear.

I think, too, that it is MY opinion that our culture gets WAY too stressed out about making sure that everything is PERFECTLY SAFE for our kids -- life isn't safe... so protect them from corporate chemicalization, but let their immune systems have some practice to get strong -- otherwise, you're dooming them to poorly developed immune systems for the rest of their lives.

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 11, 2012
at 06:51 PM

I would say over easy is near best way. Yolk is good raw. Whites need cooked. Over easy still heats the yolk, but accomplishes this pretty well. If your hens are healthy and pasture raised risk of salmonella is almost 0 even when completely raw.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 11, 2012
at 06:56 PM

http://www.foodrenegade.com/why-im-not-afraid-of-salmonella/

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on March 11, 2012
at 08:17 PM

Agreed. Also, if your immune system is healthy, then you should have more resilience...

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on March 11, 2012
at 06:59 PM

FYI I put raw egg yolks in my 2 year olds smoothies...only the eggs I get from my local source though.

1
9a86fa04b1a69b788e379093c7b83ef5

(402)

on March 11, 2012
at 07:31 PM

I think it's perfectly safe with good quality eggs. Eat up! :)

1
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on March 11, 2012
at 04:35 PM

I copied this from a low carb forum. The poster got it from the radio. Perhaps someone here can verify if this "holds water". :)

"It is known that salmonella bacteria are killed at temperatures of 140 degrees in about 3 1/2 minutes (or a higher temperature in less time). If a room temperature egg is held in a bowl of warm water ??? say, 142 degrees to be safe ??? for 3 1/2 minutes, the bacteria will be killed. It takes 5 minutes for extra large or jumbo eggs.

Place the room temperature eggs in a colander, and lower them into a pan or bowl of 142-degree water. Use an instant-read thermometer to be sure of the water temperature, and leave the thermometer in the water, to be sure that the temoerature is maintained. For medium or large eggs, leave them in the water for 3 1/2 minutes; for extra large or jumbo eggs, allow 5 minutes. Then remove the eggs, dry them, and refrigerate them, in a tightly-covered container.

Eggs begin to cook at about 160 degrees, and will be ???scrambled eggs??? at 180 ??? but if the 142 degree temperature is maintained, the result is a safe egg that will act like a raw egg in recipes."

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:37 PM

Interesting! That would be amazing if it's true! I was reading on one site that said it needed to be 160 to kill salmonella, but that was just one site... I'll start googling more to see if the 140 degrees is right. (I hope so!)

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:51 PM

Amanda, thanks! :) I'll put a thermometer in my broth or tea, and see it is 140 when I stir in the egg.

Dc0b6400ec0a34615510f4e01cedab28

(385)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:48 PM

I just found this: They can be inside the chicken before the egg is laid, so just washing eggs on the outside will NOT necessarily rid the egg of infection. If you like your eggs soft-boiled or over easy, you are throwing the dice. Only a small percentage of eggs are infected but there is no way of knowing ahead of time which ones they are. It is virtually impossible to culture each and every chicken and egg, so the consumer has to beware. Temperatures above 140 degrees will kill Salmonella but that doesn't necessarily mean the meat is done and edible. It depends on what you're eating.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 11, 2012
at 04:40 PM

Amanda, I've never had any trouble, but with children, I too would want a thermometer reading that was trustworthy. I often just stir an egg or a yolk into broth or tea. Hope what I found at the LC site is trustworthy.

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