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Eggs: Organic = Paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 26, 2013 at 10:42 AM

Take a look at the below egg carton:

  • 'roam in organic pastures'
  • 'free range ecoeggs'
  • 'independently audited and certified organic'

and importantly..

  • 'eat only certified organic grains'

But are these eggs Paleo? I make an effort to only eat grass-fed beef and grass-fed butter, but noticed that while these eggs are organic organic organic they are still grain-fed.

Should I be concerned? Should I look for eggs from grass-fed chickens? I eat three of these a day as recommended in the Perfect Health Diet so am very interested in everyone's thoughts.

Thanks, Mike

5f651b42d4b06218a61e0eba945128d9

(40)

on March 26, 2013
at 11:55 AM

True, but does a grain-fed chicken egg come with the same issues associated with grain-fed meat and grain-fed butter?

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4 Answers

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2
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on March 26, 2013
at 01:22 PM

I agree with the other poster. Eggs, in general, are good paleo food sources, since even the most commercially raised eggs are still a good source of protein and nutrients. But the gold standard is free range where they're allowed to scavenge for their food. Bugs are a great source of nutrients, and birds that eat bugs have better quality meat and eggs. As top of the food chain, I can choose to eat the animal that ate the bugs and get the benefits that way.

Eggs from chickens that eat their natural diet (not grains) have eggs richer in Omega 3s (even though you can feed them flax seed to do that too, but I prefer them to eat the way they're designed to).\

In the spectrum of eggs, the ones you're showing are pretty good, but you always have to raise an eyebrow when they tout "vegetarian" or "grain fed" diet. And, supposedly, all chickens for consumption are supposed to be hormone free, at least in the US, so that's just marketing talking.

1
37cc142fbb183f2758ef723a192e7a9d

(1353)

on March 26, 2013
at 02:04 PM

The only thing better than the type you have there are hens that are truly foraging on the ground for 100% of their diet. But should you be concerned? Not really, imo. Around here it's 4$ a dozen for the kind your talking about and 7$ per dozen of truly pastured, so you have to weigh the pros and cons.

1
717ac8a668eec6c024186d46ff30b3c3

(105)

on March 26, 2013
at 12:26 PM

Hi, grain-based feeding is common in the egg production and only by this way the organisations can attain a competitive edge and reliable production. But this does not mean that it is paleo. Grains (and also the soy) are not the natural food of the hens. However, I don't think that you should not be so concerned. This product seems close to the best you can commercially buy. Otherwise, you have to raise your own chicken for the eggs. :)

1
78d089bc8d5feaed2710005e4456edbe

on March 26, 2013
at 11:51 AM

When it comes to the paleo tag, I would consider any sort of egg paleo.

More to the point, the hens are able the roam in a pasture, making their lives better and enabling them to eat insects, worms and other things that I don't know enough about hens to that they eat.

5f651b42d4b06218a61e0eba945128d9

(40)

on March 26, 2013
at 11:55 AM

True, but does a grain-fed chicken egg come with the same issues associated with grain-fed meat and grain-fed butter?

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