6

votes

Can hard-boiled eggs really increase gut permeability?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 31, 2011 at 3:45 PM

I've heard it stated that lysozyme in eggs causes problems in some people by causing or promoting leaky gut and that these people should avoid eggs. Does this really apply to hard-boiled eggs? Cordain's website references the ability of lysozyme to survive in the acidic digestive environment but I have a hard time imagining that the enzyme can survive the hard-boiling process, wherein I would imagine the protein is denatured.

Anyone have any thoughts on this? Has anyone had problems with leaky gut associated with eating hard-boiled eggs?

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on June 23, 2011
at 11:54 AM

Rob, this is a great point. You should consider breaking this out as a separate question!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 11:08 PM

If you combine Protein and Fat it will cause digestive upsets via putrefaction/inhibited digestion as protein digests in an acid medium, carbs in an alkaline...

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 29, 2011
at 12:54 AM

My thoughts exactly :(

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on March 16, 2011
at 08:24 PM

I actually asked Matt Lalonde this question at a recent seminar and he cited research that supports a connection between hard-boiled eggs and gut permeability. Apparently lysozyme survives the boiling - that's one rigorous little enzyme!

5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on February 01, 2011
at 01:06 PM

gut inflammation, as with an allergic reaction, also increases "leakyness". so basically anything that creates a negative reaction should be avoided, except if it's just a normal adaption response to a newly introduced food.

5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on February 01, 2011
at 01:03 PM

of course there are foods that directly can cause leaky gut (hyper-permeability of the intestinal wall). gluten for example directly opens the junctions via zonulin signaling: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16635908 there are many more foods that have a similar effect as explained by robb wolf and others..

  • 1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

    asked by

    (1801)
  • Views
    11.3K
  • Last Activity
    1427D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

best answer

5
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on January 31, 2011
at 05:23 PM

Cordain's response is likely better researched than anything you'll find here. That said, my general feeling about Cordain is that he emphasizes potential risks inherent in foods he doesn't think are "paleo," ignoring other potential risks associated with literally every food we eat.

My personal experience is that hard boiled eggs (9 minutes or more) do not upset my stomach while soft boiled eggs do, especially when eaten with potatoes/sweet potatoes. The result has been consistent, even though it is very particular. I have no idea what's behind it... (For what it's worth, I also have diminished stomach acid as I'm on a PPI.)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 11:08 PM

If you combine Protein and Fat it will cause digestive upsets via putrefaction/inhibited digestion as protein digests in an acid medium, carbs in an alkaline...

2
742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on March 28, 2011
at 11:39 PM

At the sake of starting a new question, I'd like to know if anyone has healed autoimmune issues by just avoiding the egg white and not the yolk? Wolf recommends eliminating eggs for a month or so to see an improvement in symptoms, but the more I read, the more I realize that a large percent of the problem stems from consuming the egg white.

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on June 23, 2011
at 11:54 AM

Rob, this is a great point. You should consider breaking this out as a separate question!

1
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on March 29, 2011
at 05:42 PM

When I started having a leaky gut (probably due to liver problems combined with a strong dose of antibiotics) the first thing that went was eggs. I am sure they didn't cause the problem, but they seemed to create the strongest reaction once the problem was there. I am really hoping to heal my gut someday and get eggs back into my diet. (My doc says to eat the yolk anyway but to avoid the white until that time. I don't dare try it).

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on March 29, 2011
at 12:45 AM

Is this for real? I eat hard boiled eggs all the time. Well... really more like medium boiled. I don't understand how cooking them with the shell intact is any different than frying them in an open skillet.

But if this is true, and I eat 2-3 HB eggs per day, that's no bueno.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 29, 2011
at 12:54 AM

My thoughts exactly :(

1
Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on February 01, 2011
at 10:59 AM

I wanted to throw out there, that leaky gut is a histological phenomenon. I'm not sure an individual can say, "oh yeah, that foods gives me a leaky gut". We might feel some abdominal discomfort or bloating or have bowel symptoms that we associate with a certain food. But that is not at all the same thing as knowing a food causes "leaky gut" and can happen for dozens of healthy and pathological reasons. That being said, if hard boiled eggs don't bother you too much, why not enjoy them?

5f0158c23fcb5636e57b4ce097784da0

(1386)

on February 01, 2011
at 01:03 PM

of course there are foods that directly can cause leaky gut (hyper-permeability of the intestinal wall). gluten for example directly opens the junctions via zonulin signaling: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16635908 there are many more foods that have a similar effect as explained by robb wolf and others..

0
3bd5fffb23c632f58ee1d142d14f34e4

on January 17, 2013
at 12:10 AM

i only know that I have the same problem. I cannot eat boiled eggs, hard or soft, without having stomach cramps ending in loose bowel movements. hence the question I put to google which came up with your site. I am however no affected by scrabled eggs or eggs in any other form of baking/cooking. I have wondered about the sulphur content and/or whether there is another active element/chemical released and contained within hard/soft boiled eggs that may in fact be released when you otherwise crack open an egg and use it in other cooking

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!