10

votes

Are soy proteins found in the eggs of chickens that get soy-based feed?

Answered on December 30, 2015
Created January 13, 2011 at 7:18 PM

Do soy allergens end up in eggs of chickens that eat soy-based feed? For that matter, what about wheat gluten?

The Tropical Traditions site says this:

"Almost all commercial eggs, including those that are organic or marketed as 'Omega 3' eggs, are from chickens fed high concentrations of soy beans. Many people are consuming soy protein in their eggs without probably realizing it. Tropical Traditions??? soy-free organic eggs have been tested to be soy-free."

http://www.seopressreleases.com/tropical-traditions-announces-organic-soyfree-eggs-delivered-nationwide/7341

I have been trying to find evidence of this research. As an extremely soy and wheat-sensitive celiac, I am somewhat skeptical. I eat a lot of eggs and can't trace any allergic reactions to eggs; however, I do get an outbreak of a very persistent rash from time to time and I cannot identify the source. My eating is 100% clean (I prepare all my own meals...I use NO grains, NO processed food, and most adamantly NO soy and or gluten)--unless I'm ingesting something well hidden.

I have long rationalized eating (potentially) eggs from soy-fed chickens on the grounds that the soy proteins are destroyed by the chicken during its metabolism of the feed.

Solving this rash problem is my #1 most difficult and enduring health challenge. As I've learned to identify hidden allergens, I've brought the incidence of rash down to once every couple months. It is the same rash I had when I used to get exposed to soy and wheat on a regular basis, after adopting a soy and wheat-free diet (i.e., when restaurant servers mischaracterized the food they served me, or when I ate something without studying up on it or reading the label).

For what it's worth, I buy both "cage free" and "pastured" eggs from my local co-op. They're all from local chickens but I buy a variety of different brands from many different farms. I have not investigated what each farm feeds their birds but I avoid any egg that says "100% vegetarian diet" (for obvious reasons...chickens aren't vegetarians).

If one (or more) of my sources is periodically giving me a dose of soy proteins, this could explain the rash.

Thoughts? References to research that shows allergen proteins ending up in the eggs (or even flesh) of any animal that ingests said proteins?

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I've found one source of raw fish eggs (salmon, specifically) online, raw, but most fish eggs you'll get commercially are NOT gluten-free. Roe at sushi restaurants is almost always marinated in soy sauce, and even caviar often has gluten in it, according to celiac message boards.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 10, 2012
at 11:40 AM

I'm sorry to hear that. What about soy-fed meat? Any reaction there?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 22, 2012
at 07:13 PM

And you're soy-free in every other way?

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 24, 2011
at 11:29 PM

http://www.glutenzap.com/

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 19, 2011
at 03:05 PM

Sigh... That's unfortunate. I could have sworn I had learned otherwise... So much for that.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 19, 2011
at 02:21 PM

I have not heard of this forum.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 19, 2011
at 02:20 PM

Got an email back from Michael Hawes at Belovo. His response was that "we do use a small amount of soy meal for the protein component...."

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:47 PM

that implies it, but it was something i specifically looked for(soyfree) back when i found them... you can contact them direct: Belovo Inc. PO Box 4092 Pinehurst NC 28387 Phone 910.295.2320 Fax 910.246.2355 Email [email protected]

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:46 PM

the nutrition page is down, pretty sure it was on there, but in their text it says: Currently, many other eggs are from chickens fed primarily wheat and soya. This results in eggs that are much lower in Omega-3 than Omega-6 fatty acids,

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:35 PM

Interesting. A chicken is what it eats, apparently. The article details isoflavones coming through in the eggs and flesh. But what about allergenic proteins?

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:33 PM

How do you know Christopher Eggs are soy free?

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 17, 2011
at 01:37 AM

Are you reading over at the gluten zap forum?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:25 AM

if they dont have them in stock, ask the manager, they can order them at customer request. 2 stores in my area, the closer one didnt have them, I requested and they started carrying them.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 14, 2011
at 11:55 PM

I'm definitely going to look for the Christoher Eggs, thanks Stephen! I have a Kroger about 30 minutes away, but I rarely go there.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:55 PM

Right. Its just so difficult for me to understand why so many people eat eggs (both in volume and frequency) when the main source of food for those eggs is grain / soy based, all things we actively avoid. The same reason most people on here buy grass fed meats.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:53 PM

I suppose genetic modification could alter some of the feed's transferable constituents, but I'm not sure of which and what the mechanisms would be. My gut feeling is that your rash is the result of something you are overlooking. For example, I never have a problem with fowl, but I will get really itchy as a result of eating capsicums, but not nightshade in general since potatoes cause me no problems.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:49 PM

This question, and an older question by Stephen Aegis, prompted me to write it. I don't feel like anyone has addressed it and I'm puzzled by the lack of citations to research. Then again, it's a difficult search to perform because most hits have to do with people who suffer from multiple allergies.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:47 PM

I certainly hope you are correct. That said, I've found three or four independent allegations on various Websites but no substantiation with research (not even secondary sources). For example, "labeling won't help the increasing numbers of people who are starting to react to the flesh of fish, poultry, lamb or cattle that were fattened on soy feed and to eggs laid by soy fed chickens...." Weston A Price Website: http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/669.html

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:43 PM

Not directly, but I basically want eggs without any contact to Soy, grains, as I completely avoid these in my diet.

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11 Answers

3
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on January 14, 2011
at 11:43 PM

Ive seen anecdotal studies all over about this from individuals with a soy allergy.

http://www.choosingvoluntarysimplicity.com/learning-how-to-eat-again-when-you-have-a-soy-allergy/

Fresh meat??? When an animal is fed a soy-based diet, does the soy ???come through??? in the meat? How about eggs and soy-fed hens? I have never seen research on this subject. I have, however, had one of the worst allergic reactions of my life after eating a small amount of chicken (and nothing else) from a certain famous company. A call to this company revealed that the diet fed to these chickens was entirely soybeans. It is a given that most food animals are fed a diet high in soy??? we discovered firsthand how difficult it is to find soy-free commercial animal feed when we first started feeding our pig, goat, chickens, ducks, and geese. (For the record, these animals were all pets and not for food.) Not everyone will want to do as we have done??? we have almost entirely eliminated meat from our diet, and we have done this for a variety of reasons besides soy??? but if you???re still having reactions and can???t trace the cause, meat from soy-fed animals could be the hidden culprit. Also, with the holidays coming up, you will want to avoid self-basting turkeys or any turkeys that have an ingredient list with ???natural flavors added.???

http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/669-dealing-with-soy-allergies.html

For highly allergic people, the new labeling law is not enough. Soy oil, lecithin and vitamin E (often added as a preservative) do not fall under the labeling requirement. (The FDA reasons that such products are free of soy protein, which is only true when they are manufactured under perfect conditions.) Animal products too may unexpectedly contain "hidden" soy. Some will appear on labels such as "extenders" added to ground meat, "plasticizers" used to hold patties, meat balls and hot dogs together or soy oil pumped into pre-basted turkeys. But labeling won't help the increasing numbers of people who are starting to react to the flesh of fish, poultry, lamb or cattle that were fattened on soy feed and to eggs laid by soy fed chickens.

Edit: extremely disappointed to find that the Christopher eggs are actually not soy free.

Found another option:

http://yankeeacres.com/soy-free-eggs/

are-soy-proteins-found-in-the-eggs-of-chickens-that-get-soy-based-feed?

Farm Fresh Eggs (ungraded) from pastured, free range hens fed a SOY FREE DIET at Yankee Acres:

SIZE PRICE

PeeWee $1.50/Doz

Small $2.50/Doz

Medium $3.00/Doz

Large $4.00/Doz

Extra-Large $5.00/Doz

Jumbo (& beyond!) $3.00/ Half Dozen

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:47 PM

that implies it, but it was something i specifically looked for(soyfree) back when i found them... you can contact them direct: Belovo Inc. PO Box 4092 Pinehurst NC 28387 Phone 910.295.2320 Fax 910.246.2355 Email [email protected]

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 15, 2011
at 12:25 AM

if they dont have them in stock, ask the manager, they can order them at customer request. 2 stores in my area, the closer one didnt have them, I requested and they started carrying them.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on January 14, 2011
at 11:55 PM

I'm definitely going to look for the Christoher Eggs, thanks Stephen! I have a Kroger about 30 minutes away, but I rarely go there.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:33 PM

How do you know Christopher Eggs are soy free?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:46 PM

the nutrition page is down, pretty sure it was on there, but in their text it says: Currently, many other eggs are from chickens fed primarily wheat and soya. This results in eggs that are much lower in Omega-3 than Omega-6 fatty acids,

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 19, 2011
at 03:05 PM

Sigh... That's unfortunate. I could have sworn I had learned otherwise... So much for that.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 19, 2011
at 02:20 PM

Got an email back from Michael Hawes at Belovo. His response was that "we do use a small amount of soy meal for the protein component...."

3
Medium avatar

on January 13, 2011
at 07:28 PM

I think they are broken down into their various amino acids and then reconstituted as "egg protein" or "chicken protein." What would transfer over would be the high omega-6 in the feed.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:47 PM

I certainly hope you are correct. That said, I've found three or four independent allegations on various Websites but no substantiation with research (not even secondary sources). For example, "labeling won't help the increasing numbers of people who are starting to react to the flesh of fish, poultry, lamb or cattle that were fattened on soy feed and to eggs laid by soy fed chickens...." Weston A Price Website: http://www.westonaprice.org/soy-alert/669.html

Medium avatar

(39831)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:53 PM

I suppose genetic modification could alter some of the feed's transferable constituents, but I'm not sure of which and what the mechanisms would be. My gut feeling is that your rash is the result of something you are overlooking. For example, I never have a problem with fowl, but I will get really itchy as a result of eating capsicums, but not nightshade in general since potatoes cause me no problems.

1
F7d99ead029af1739f5ccbe13a425a8c

on June 10, 2012
at 11:27 AM

I've had a bout of egg-reaction this week that I'll never forget! Almost sent me to the emergency room. The only trace back was from farm eggs that I bought at a local farmer's market this past week.

I'll certainly be asking some questions next time I'm down there...

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 10, 2012
at 11:40 AM

I'm sorry to hear that. What about soy-fed meat? Any reaction there?

1
A5a3ea88f01c9d799d0a0fd83c13b43f

on April 22, 2012
at 05:56 PM

I used to get very sick from eating eggs--like food poisoning, about 20 minutes after eating. I went to the doctor and had an allergy test, but negative for eggs. The doctor said that the reaction could be caused by the feed the chickens were eating. Now I only eat eggs from my daughter's chickens, who are fed corn. I don't have any problems with them.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 22, 2012
at 07:13 PM

And you're soy-free in every other way?

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on January 16, 2011
at 08:26 PM

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 17, 2011
at 03:35 PM

Interesting. A chicken is what it eats, apparently. The article details isoflavones coming through in the eggs and flesh. But what about allergenic proteins?

1
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:41 PM

This is effectively what I was trying to ask (in part) in my recent post here

http://paleohacks.com/questions/18880/3-part-question-on-eggs#axzz1AwU63ndK

But just worded much better. Thanks for asking this Wjones, I'm looking forward to answers.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:43 PM

Not directly, but I basically want eggs without any contact to Soy, grains, as I completely avoid these in my diet.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:55 PM

Right. Its just so difficult for me to understand why so many people eat eggs (both in volume and frequency) when the main source of food for those eggs is grain / soy based, all things we actively avoid. The same reason most people on here buy grass fed meats.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 13, 2011
at 07:49 PM

This question, and an older question by Stephen Aegis, prompted me to write it. I don't feel like anyone has addressed it and I'm puzzled by the lack of citations to research. Then again, it's a difficult search to perform because most hits have to do with people who suffer from multiple allergies.

0
72611ba027abf911789f011d8a8ccce0

on December 30, 2015
at 06:14 PM

Hi Everyone!!  Most people who have reactions from eating eggs, are having a reaction to the grain they are fed. It isn't so much the kind of grain soy, wheat, rye but how it is grown, whay it is sprayed with, the biggest problem is the use of roundup. Most hens are fed low quality feed that are made with poor quality grain then preserved with chemicals so the feed doesn't mold and spoil before it is used months later. You should buy eggs from a local farm, where you can speak with the farmer, ask questions like what type of diet do you feed plant based, is your feed laced with chemicals to extend its life? If you have trouble finding a farm close to you, there's farm in Williamstown FAR Wind Farm 1844 Winslow Road 609-774-0629they have a facebook page and a website where you can check them out

0
72611ba027abf911789f011d8a8ccce0

on December 30, 2015
at 04:51 PM

Most people who have reactions from eating eggs, are having a reaction to the grain they are fed. It isn't so much the kind of grain soy, wheat, rye but how it is grown, whay it is sprayed with, the biggest problem is the use of roundup. Most hens are fed low quality feed that are made with poor quality grain then preserved with chemicals so the feed doesn't mold and spoil before it is used months later. You should buy eggs from a local farm, where you can speak with the farmer, ask questions like what type of diet do you feed plant based, is your feed laced with chemicals to extend its life? If you have trouble finding a farm close to you, there's farm in Williamstown FAR Wind Farm  1844 Winslow Road 609-774-0629they have a facebook page and a website where you can check them out

0
A87cf01a72dfbde3a5cf3b895afd904a

on April 01, 2013
at 06:26 PM

If you are affected by soy and gluten because of an autoimmune thyroid disorder, as I am, you may not get a violent reaction when eating eggs that contain those ingredients, but you can still have harm done to your body that you might not detect, like on an immune level. Not everything happening to the body because of soy and gluten is going to show up in an obvious way. But it can still be bad for you. I think we need to eat animals that are raised the way the animals were created to eat. There will always be less problems when we do.

0
E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 10, 2012
at 11:38 AM

Yeah, unfortunately it's true. Just one "soy-fed-egg" and I'll look like I've spent the night on an anthill.

0
3c7ae2aec385cb1e2cdbf18fed30c0fe

on January 14, 2011
at 07:20 AM

Hi All, I have found that the best source of eggs is fish eggs, & it give you iodine.

Paul.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

I've found one source of raw fish eggs (salmon, specifically) online, raw, but most fish eggs you'll get commercially are NOT gluten-free. Roe at sushi restaurants is almost always marinated in soy sauce, and even caviar often has gluten in it, according to celiac message boards.

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