4

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Any homeschooling programs with nutrition built in?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 22, 2013 at 4:26 AM

One of my biggest qualms with the politically correct, K-12 education system in the U.S. is the lack of preventative nutrition and (serious) exercise program. It seems the entire curricula is written as though to deliberately produce the most degenerate slobs to ever walk the surface of the earth (said here as a certified graduate).

What homeschool program would you recommend with regard to including the best nutrition program? Any Paleo-compatible homeschooling programs? Or must I try to invent my own?

74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

(1663)

on January 23, 2013
at 11:59 PM

"Degenerate slobs to ever walk the surface of the earth". BAHAHA! This is classic. I love it.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on January 22, 2013
at 01:52 PM

+1 We homeschool and that's about how it happens here. Involve your kids with cooking, and talk to them about food when you do! Go play outside with them. Talk about biology and how different types of animals eat different things and why. When my kids get older I have a few books I'd like them to read (anthropology texts, mostly), but I highly encourage just being involved in teaching them the joys of cooking good food and moving outside right now. They're more apt to remember it if it's a regular part of life.

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4 Answers

3
94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on January 22, 2013
at 01:10 PM

um, you are homeschooling - your "nutrition and exercise" program should just be a part of your day to day life, imho. You've probably got a good headstart since your kids aren't eating school cafeteria fare. I homeschool (only one admittedly which is not the same as more) and the importance of nutrition and exercise are just common discussions not necessarily part of our curriculum. There have been times, and there will still be some, when we use a tracker (I'm thinking cronometer.com next) to see how nutritious our diets are without added multi-vites and supplements. I like cronometer because I can change the macros to reflect a more paleo ratio rather than the SAD. Other than that, depending on the age of your kid(s) there's also "Eat Like A Dinosaur", a paleo kids cookbook. There's a section in there that's a picture book to help explain to kids why to eat this way.

And then there's just your personal modelling - do you model healthy eating and exercise? My parents, while mostly SAD eaters, still had a lot of good modelling when I grew up by gardening and always providing veggies, buying sides of local beef, picking wild berries every summer and canning them, walking for exercise nearly everyday if they hadn't been doing some intense gardening or something. I still often think of how well they are doing just by some of these practices and being moderate consumers rather than hooked on restaurant and processed foods. hth

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on January 22, 2013
at 01:52 PM

+1 We homeschool and that's about how it happens here. Involve your kids with cooking, and talk to them about food when you do! Go play outside with them. Talk about biology and how different types of animals eat different things and why. When my kids get older I have a few books I'd like them to read (anthropology texts, mostly), but I highly encourage just being involved in teaching them the joys of cooking good food and moving outside right now. They're more apt to remember it if it's a regular part of life.

2
2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on January 22, 2013
at 01:10 PM

I think that nutrition has become a very touchy subject and like religion, is best left to the parents to teach. Each culture around the world has such different ideas on appropriate foods that I don't think a school could teach much at all without offending parents. I would not discount a school due to lack of nutrition and physical education. You could make lessons on these to teach at home if you feel the need to or even just explain at the dinner table why certain foods are important. I think kids learn a lot on these subjects by just watching family and a formal lesson is not quite necessary. I don't think that schools necessarily create slobs. The purpose of a school is to teach math, history, and such, not to teach people how to live their home lives. Families and communities teach those things.

2
D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

on January 22, 2013
at 04:48 AM

I was homeschooled, and I worked in a homeschool curriculum consignment store while in college. Honestly, the only books I really saw on the matter were singular, specific books (often in muted book covers from the 80s!), rather than built-in texts. To be honest, what I vaguely remember reading from my health textbook regarding nutrition was the same ol' conventional wisdom. Nourishing Traditions was a common book, however. It's funny because I grew up somewhat familiar with that book but never read it until I asked for it for my 24th birthday last year.

1
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 23, 2013
at 06:31 PM

Nourishing Our Children is a great resource for educational materials on real food. It's not "Paleo." It's more Weston Price oriented, but it is waaaay different from anything you'd get from something mainstream, food pyramid, etc.

You can click on "Our services and products" and you'll be able to find descriptions of their DVDs, books, and PowerPoints.

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