4

votes

Anti-Nutrients - Can we be more specific

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 14, 2012 at 3:47 AM

So,

we all know why we are Paleo/Primal/lacto-Paleo. We know why we eat the way we do (for the most part). So can we get a little more specific about anti-nutrients? What are they? Do they have names? Do they not have names because that kind of research isn't well funded? We all know that KNOWING your food is important. Are there any resources to shed some light on the subject of anti-nutrients better (for my personal edification)?

Note: I simply want a better, more informed, way of explaining my lifestyle to others who question me. Especially those who are vocally opposed to my type of lifestyle.

Thanks!

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 14, 2012
at 11:18 PM

I believe certain grains (wheat primarily), certain beans and legumes, and hibiscus are the common ones. Cooking usually, but not always, destroys amylase inhibitor activity.

Fc25b41326b954c4e5b8ce0dabb889a6

(523)

on July 14, 2012
at 10:53 PM

What foods contain Amylase inhibitors? Curious for my sisters sake. Thanks for the great answer!

Cd717290eb43a6e17061f9920deed977

(1267)

on July 14, 2012
at 04:57 PM

I hate wheat! I mean, like on a personal, vendetta level!

Fc25b41326b954c4e5b8ce0dabb889a6

(523)

on July 14, 2012
at 03:53 PM

I think it answers a good portion of it. The side about the extent to which research has probably been hampered by lack of support for the movement/knowledge base is missing, but it answers part of what I was looking for. This is a lot of what I was looking for.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 14, 2012
at 02:47 PM

Nonetheless, a correct answer to the question.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 14, 2012
at 02:46 PM

As much as we like to demonize phytic acid, our diet (even the paleo diet) is full of phytic acid. Humans have evolved to consume all sorts of less than ideal, yet natural, things: phytic acid, lectins, toxins, carcinogens, etc...

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 14, 2012
at 02:45 PM

Gluten and lectins aren't necessarily bad (they are problematic when leaky gut is present), nor are they anti-nutrients.

83d2d5eaaa2704020286e98c470f6a44

(340)

on July 14, 2012
at 12:56 PM

They are toxins in some food.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 14, 2012
at 04:17 AM

This does not answer the question...

  • Fc25b41326b954c4e5b8ce0dabb889a6

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4 Answers

4
03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

on July 14, 2012
at 05:02 AM

An anti nutrient is something that inhibits a nutrient from being used from the body.

For example, phytic acid, which is found in bran and seeds, binds to zinc and iron, carrying them out of the body before they can be absorbed.

Other anti nutrients either bind to nutrients to prevent their absorption, react with nutrients to form undigestible compounds, or inhibit digestive proteins from breaking down a nutrient so it can be used by the body.

Fermentation and cooking are two methods used to inactivate anti nutrients.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 14, 2012
at 02:47 PM

Nonetheless, a correct answer to the question.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 14, 2012
at 02:46 PM

As much as we like to demonize phytic acid, our diet (even the paleo diet) is full of phytic acid. Humans have evolved to consume all sorts of less than ideal, yet natural, things: phytic acid, lectins, toxins, carcinogens, etc...

4
C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 14, 2012
at 04:00 AM

Well, for grains, such as wheat, you have gluten, which is a protein that wreaks havoc in the intestine for a lot of people, and leads to full blown celiac disease in about 3% of the population. It has gliadin, another protein that can penetrate the gut barrier and cause an auto immune response. It also has lectin, another sugar binding protein in wheat that can trigger auto immune responses in people. And it has Amylopectin A, one of the worst forms of carbohydrate for causing an insulin response. Is that enough bad in wheat to give it up? Oh, and unless "fortified" gives virtually no nutritional value except for calories.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 14, 2012
at 04:17 AM

This does not answer the question...

Fc25b41326b954c4e5b8ce0dabb889a6

(523)

on July 14, 2012
at 03:53 PM

I think it answers a good portion of it. The side about the extent to which research has probably been hampered by lack of support for the movement/knowledge base is missing, but it answers part of what I was looking for. This is a lot of what I was looking for.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 14, 2012
at 02:45 PM

Gluten and lectins aren't necessarily bad (they are problematic when leaky gut is present), nor are they anti-nutrients.

Cd717290eb43a6e17061f9920deed977

(1267)

on July 14, 2012
at 04:57 PM

I hate wheat! I mean, like on a personal, vendetta level!

2
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 14, 2012
at 08:24 PM

See Chinaeskimo's answer, but anti-nutrients interfere with the absorption of nutrients. Many of them bind to nutrients and cause them to be excreted:

Phytic acid: binds zinc, iron, copper, and to a lesser extent, calcium and magnesium.

Oxalic acid: binds calcium and magnesium.

Tannins: binds iron and zinc.

Avidin: binds biotin (vitamin B7).

Then there are a number of enzyme inhibitors, which are anti-nutrients by blocking enzymes important in the digestion of food:

Amylase inhibitor: block the enzyme that allows us to digest starch.

Trypsin inhibitors: block an enzyme involved in digesting protein.

I'm not sure which category to put it in, but Goitrogens (of which there are many) interfere with iodine uptake.

And this list goes on. Since an anti-nutrient is anything that interferes with the absorption of nutrients, you could really stretch what you consider an anti-nutrient to make a pretty long list (some insoluble fibers in grains have been shown to cause mineral loss in feces by an unclear mechanism). And of course, just because something is an anti-nutrient does not mean it's automatically "bad".

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 14, 2012
at 11:18 PM

I believe certain grains (wheat primarily), certain beans and legumes, and hibiscus are the common ones. Cooking usually, but not always, destroys amylase inhibitor activity.

Fc25b41326b954c4e5b8ce0dabb889a6

(523)

on July 14, 2012
at 10:53 PM

What foods contain Amylase inhibitors? Curious for my sisters sake. Thanks for the great answer!

1
83d2d5eaaa2704020286e98c470f6a44

(340)

on July 14, 2012
at 12:52 PM

Cardiologydoc

"Antinutrients ??? Key to bad health:

You probably already know a lot about nutrients, macronutrients (fats, protein and carbohydrates and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytosterols etc). Now it???s time to meet the rest of the family??????. We all know that foods contain a variety of nutrients. There is less awareness that many foods contain small amounts of potentially harmful substances. These are toxins, as they have toxic effects. They are normally called ???antinutrients??? by the scientific community as toxins sounds too alarmist. Antinutrients are very real and for over 100 years research has been done on them but it is generally only appreciated by a small group of specialised scientists. Antinutrients have an incredible range of biological effects. As you have probably already guessed, the vast majority and highest levels of antinutrients are in Neolithic foods like grains, beans and potatoes. The Paleolithic diet has incredibly low levels of antinutrients compared to the usual modern diet. I believe that this is the number one advantage of the diet."

Here is more http://cardiologydoc.wordpress.com/2012/02/11/paleolithic-cave-man-diets/

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