1

votes

Any Real Solutions For Eczema?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 20, 2013 at 4:36 AM

Particularly around the eyes and inner ears?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on May 22, 2013
at 03:57 PM

I literally can't drink anything now. My face takes a week to get better. Right now it's red, tight, hot, painful and sensitive, and anything I but on it burns like acid. All from 5hrs in strong aircon and a single measure of vodka :( OP - avoid aqueous cream as it often has SLS in, which is a major irritant :(

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on May 22, 2013
at 07:35 AM

These are all bad for me too. But if you have to drink, drink vodka, gin or other super-distilled spirits. Distillation reduces histamine, yeast and other noxious chemicals, although it's still alcohol, which is a big TRP channel activator.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on May 22, 2013
at 07:32 AM

get some Mexican dish with a ton of cheese on it and get a slight itchiness but not full-blown eczema. I have been eating cheese here and there over the past months and have survived without serious return of eczema, but eggs? It's bad. I neglected to mention this is actually my second trial with eggs and I suspected the same thing happened before, but wasn't sure. Now I'm pretty durn sure. Another thing - I think allergy/sensitive tests are good but be wary of false negatives. But so far, everything that came up positive for me has turned out to be pretty spot on.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on May 22, 2013
at 07:28 AM

I do find cheese pretty problematic because it's both dairy and high-histamine/yeast. Anything fermented messes with me pretty badly and I believe it has to do with the histamine content - or other chemicals involved in fermentation. I imagine that anyone with eczema or related forms of inflammation would be sensitive to high-histamine foods, regardless of underlying allergies, because histamine is the mediator of the inflammation itself. However, yes - my now-returned eczema is taking awhile to subside, which further emphasizes that eggs are hugely bad for me. Whereas I might go on a limb and

63075669c2ec8cb6dab906c334c9b911

(112)

on May 20, 2013
at 06:56 PM

I reintroduced cheese and found that I had no deterioration for a few days so I added eggs and within two days my eczema became bad. Funny thing is, after two days of cutting the eggs again the problem has not improved at all. Does it take time for the reaction to go away from eggs, or might the cheese be a problem which I didn't previously discover?

63075669c2ec8cb6dab906c334c9b911

(112)

on May 20, 2013
at 06:50 PM

No it isn't. It's a symptom. The cause of which could be many things.

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on May 20, 2013
at 06:25 PM

I'm going to get tested for eggs now!

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7 Answers

1
3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on May 20, 2013
at 02:17 PM

I had a friend who eliminated his skin issues when he bumped up his fat content. After a year of me telling him to ditch the cereal breakfast for bacon and eggs, he tried the eggs but not the bacon. He felt much better. As soon as he added the bacon and increased his fat, his skin issues cleared up. After another year, he wanted to see if it was the fat, so he cut back and his skin issues came right back.

Give bacon and fat a try. It may not work, but at least it'll taste good!

0
C30829598b24b28676feb91b087820af

on May 21, 2013
at 01:02 AM

I'm wondering that too, especially since my eczema is adult onset (didn't start until I was 30!). I haven't had gluten in 8 years - I hope its not eggs, etc...

0
7be90503819d8a9aa33af11001474e88

on May 20, 2013
at 08:40 PM

I sometimes get a patch on my thumb when I'm stressed. I put tea tree oil on it a few nights before bed and it'll go away. Wouldn't recommend putting that near your eyes though!

0
68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on May 20, 2013
at 06:26 PM

Alcohol

Dairy

Dry air/hard water

Eliminate them all!

I don't get eczema from dairy but more than 2 alcoholic drinks and it's all over my face :(

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on May 22, 2013
at 03:57 PM

I literally can't drink anything now. My face takes a week to get better. Right now it's red, tight, hot, painful and sensitive, and anything I but on it burns like acid. All from 5hrs in strong aircon and a single measure of vodka :( OP - avoid aqueous cream as it often has SLS in, which is a major irritant :(

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on May 22, 2013
at 07:35 AM

These are all bad for me too. But if you have to drink, drink vodka, gin or other super-distilled spirits. Distillation reduces histamine, yeast and other noxious chemicals, although it's still alcohol, which is a big TRP channel activator.

0
67871ef2326f29da48f1522827fc0f80

(704)

on May 20, 2013
at 03:08 PM

My skin has improved greatly but avoiding dairy. If I do the smallest cheat (a square of cheese), it reacts within 12 hours.

0
537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on May 20, 2013
at 03:03 PM

I heard somewhere eczema is an omega 6 deficiency. GLA (evening primrose oil) or Bacon fat would probably be good to try.

63075669c2ec8cb6dab906c334c9b911

(112)

on May 20, 2013
at 06:50 PM

No it isn't. It's a symptom. The cause of which could be many things.

0
7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

on May 20, 2013
at 06:11 AM

For me: eliminate stuff, and get a delayed allergy test to be sure you're getting the culprits you may not suspect. Although I was hugely incredulous that my test showed sensitivity to eggs, gluten, dairy, peanuts, almonds, etc. - I did force myself to eliminate those and found my eczema largely went away, but unfortunately I have myriad other sensitivities that did NOT show up on the test and eliminating those by trial and error has had a cumulatively positive effect. Also, cod liver oil makes an obvious difference, although I'm sensitive to it too, somehow - so I only dose maybe once a week.

BUT - right now, the BIG one? EGGS. I think I've figured it out. Since eggs are such a huge paleo staple I thought, No frickin' way. Or, it's just the whites. But my test said all parts were problematic - whites, yolks, duck eggs, etc. and the naturopath I saw was very emphatic about how she saw many clients with eczema who were affected by eggs most of all. I really thought that was bunk because I never noticed any effect eating eggs, while eating an apple would soon make my eyes tingle and burn, for instance. But, with profound reluctance, I eliminated eggs for quite a long time and just started adding them back in a couple days ago. Lo, my skin is incredibly itchy, new bumps and cracks appearing (I get it primarily on my hands) and my skin just seems overall dry and awful. I've grown more tolerant of some fruits and even a little unfermented dairy, but I wonder if the increased tolerance stemmed from removing the particularly bad, er, egg - eggs.

Anyway, but we're all unique snowflakes as someone said above - so YMMV, etc. etc. Good luck!

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on May 20, 2013
at 06:25 PM

I'm going to get tested for eggs now!

63075669c2ec8cb6dab906c334c9b911

(112)

on May 20, 2013
at 06:56 PM

I reintroduced cheese and found that I had no deterioration for a few days so I added eggs and within two days my eczema became bad. Funny thing is, after two days of cutting the eggs again the problem has not improved at all. Does it take time for the reaction to go away from eggs, or might the cheese be a problem which I didn't previously discover?

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on May 22, 2013
at 07:32 AM

get some Mexican dish with a ton of cheese on it and get a slight itchiness but not full-blown eczema. I have been eating cheese here and there over the past months and have survived without serious return of eczema, but eggs? It's bad. I neglected to mention this is actually my second trial with eggs and I suspected the same thing happened before, but wasn't sure. Now I'm pretty durn sure. Another thing - I think allergy/sensitive tests are good but be wary of false negatives. But so far, everything that came up positive for me has turned out to be pretty spot on.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on May 22, 2013
at 07:28 AM

I do find cheese pretty problematic because it's both dairy and high-histamine/yeast. Anything fermented messes with me pretty badly and I believe it has to do with the histamine content - or other chemicals involved in fermentation. I imagine that anyone with eczema or related forms of inflammation would be sensitive to high-histamine foods, regardless of underlying allergies, because histamine is the mediator of the inflammation itself. However, yes - my now-returned eczema is taking awhile to subside, which further emphasizes that eggs are hugely bad for me. Whereas I might go on a limb and

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