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Will eating bones make my bones bigger?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 21, 2013 at 10:29 PM

Will my bone mineral density or bone mineral content or bone size or whatever increase from eating bones?

Technique to eat bones: cook as a bone broth until they're edible. Preferably mushed up in the actual broth.

3701e7c9e76fe7a6abfe14498d742259

(55)

on May 25, 2013
at 12:42 AM

Thanks for your feedback Jake

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on May 22, 2013
at 12:32 PM

Vitamin K2 also seems to help a lot with bone density as seems that is needed to activate osteocalcin that leads calcium to be used for bone health, it makes a nice duo with Vitamin D3.

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00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on May 22, 2013
at 04:09 AM

Maybe. If you're coming off a SAD-style diet to a Paleo-style diet, you might well end up with denser bones, but the relationship isn't going to be linear. At some point, your bones will achieve a normal density and then stop getting denser due to changes in diet alone. For optimally healthy bone density, though, you have to do some weight-bearing exercise regularly.

Making bone broth's a great idea, but speaking from experience, the bones in the broth won't turn to mush, even for chicken bone broth. To get the maximum amount of minerals from bone, you could eat the marrow, you could double up on your bone purchases and make roasted marrow and bone broth.

Don't forget liver from traditionally-raised animals for bone-building minerals, too.

Also, don't shy away from dairy products, esp. cheese, from traditionally-raised animals, as a source of calcium for bones, if you can tolerate dairy. I know that dairy's in the paleo "gray area," but sometimes, convenience wins.

3701e7c9e76fe7a6abfe14498d742259

(55)

on May 25, 2013
at 12:42 AM

Thanks for your feedback Jake

1
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 22, 2013
at 12:16 PM

Bone is a connective tissue largely composed of an organic protein; collagen and the inorganic mineral hydroxyapatite, which combine to provide a mechanical and supportive role in the body (Smith et al. 1983:211).

Vitamin D and hydroxyapatite shown to increase bone density in postmenopausal women with primary biliary cirrhosis (Am J Clin Nutr 1982;36(3):426-30).

Vitamin D and hydroxyapatite shown to increase bone density in postmenopausal women with primary biliary cirrhosis

Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic liver disease that results in the severe malapsorption of nutrients. Malabsorption of the nutrients calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D are known to cause accelerated loss of bone tissue.

Researchers sought to investigate the value of parenteral (intravenous) vitamin D, oral hydroxyapatite (HA), and calcium gluconate (CG) in treatment of cortical bone thinning in patients with PCB. These forms of nutrients were chosen based on their increased likelihood of absorption.

In this study, 64 postmenopausal women with PBC were randomly assigned into 3 groups: group 1 received no mineral supplementation, group 2 received a finely powdered extract of HA (8 grams per day), and group 3 received effervescent CG tablets (4 tablets per day). In addition, all 3 groups received parenteral vitamin D.

Patients were assessed at 3-month intervals by radiographs to determine bone mineral density.

Results showed that patients treated with HA and vitamin D had an 11.6% increase in bone growth. Supplementation with CG and vitamin D prevented bone thinning, but was not effective in promoting bone growth. Vitamin D therapy alone had no affect on bone protection.

O. Epstein and colleagues concluded in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that "...in postmenopausal patients with PBC, calcium supplements given in addition to parenteral vitamin D prevents or retards pathological cortical bone thinning. Because both calcium and phosphate are malabsorbed in PBC, HA is a highly suitable mineral supplement."

So to answer your question.. It might increase bone growth a little and it would likely be more effective than straight calcium supplements.

Also, I just found a meta-analysis comparing hydroxyapatite with calcium carbonate here.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on May 22, 2013
at 12:32 PM

Vitamin K2 also seems to help a lot with bone density as seems that is needed to activate osteocalcin that leads calcium to be used for bone health, it makes a nice duo with Vitamin D3.

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