4

votes

Has anyone here read Lierre Keith's 2009 book, The Vegetarian Myth? If so, what were your thoughts about it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 09, 2012 at 11:50 PM

Thanks, Kane

3786c1756c645498613573dfcfe2ff5f

on February 16, 2012
at 01:46 AM

Thank you for that link. I wondered if any of the major paleo bloggers had read it.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 10, 2012
at 11:13 PM

That link is actually her review of "Deep Green Resistance: Strategy to Save the Planet", by Lierre Keith, Derrick Jensen, and Aric McBay.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 10, 2012
at 09:25 AM

I believe it mostly had to do with the threatening comments received by fans and enemies of the book alike. If anyone is in a position to critique the book, I believe it would be Melissa, but she took a whole lotta [email protected]!t from both sides for offering both her support and criticisms of the book.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:49 AM

I gave a copy of it to a mostly vegetarian family member for xmas, and she's still talking to me. I only thought to give it to her though because when I was reading it at a family gathering she seemed to enjoy flipping through it. Out of the blue might not be so good. Maybe baby steps starting with talking about rewilding efforts where large ruminant grazing has been able to reverse both desertification and melting of the permafrost in grazing experiments.

9dd4d453f7ebd7fd2a82814d08fc8f17

(581)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:45 AM

i agree with jenny that her feminism or anti-patriarchal ideals don't take away from the book. many academic authors have made convincing and substantiated analysis that imperialism, patriarchalism (spelling), and agriculture are all connected and related. i think it's just like how some ppl don't like "chick flicks" because it's too much about feelings; some ppl require their readings to be devoted of feelings and only written in a cold hard way. so i think some of the more feminine parts of the book can go either way.

D8f58eba263277ec6119293137b85b02

(1061)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:32 AM

Yeah, that anger, so evident in the title alone (maybe not to us, but the harshest way to attack any belief is to call it a myth), is why I'm hesitant to suggest it to my vegetarian sister. I don't want to seem like I'm manically proselytizing and if she goes into it on the defense, I'm thinking she won't be able to open her mind to it enough.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:02 AM

"feminist/anti-patriarchal analogies and metaphors just made me role my eyes"- Even if the book was about nutrition, it is not surprising that her well advertised feminist background was involved. It is a major part of who she is, and I would be surprised if it WASN'T in the book. This is one of the aspects of the book I respected, her staying true to her whole person.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

8 Answers

8
4d6aa1a676240b15dc569ff8ade0500f

(2546)

on February 10, 2012
at 01:38 AM

if you can get past the WAY it's written, it does contain a lot of useful information. it's a little intense and metaphysical at times, and sometimes her feminist / anti-patriarchal analogies and metaphors just made me roll my eyes...but it did give me the ability to argue any vegetarian under the table (no matter what the reason for the vegetarianism). i'm coming from an ex-vegetarian perspective, so it also helped me clarify some things about how i felt on some of these issues.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:02 AM

"feminist/anti-patriarchal analogies and metaphors just made me role my eyes"- Even if the book was about nutrition, it is not surprising that her well advertised feminist background was involved. It is a major part of who she is, and I would be surprised if it WASN'T in the book. This is one of the aspects of the book I respected, her staying true to her whole person.

9dd4d453f7ebd7fd2a82814d08fc8f17

(581)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:45 AM

i agree with jenny that her feminism or anti-patriarchal ideals don't take away from the book. many academic authors have made convincing and substantiated analysis that imperialism, patriarchalism (spelling), and agriculture are all connected and related. i think it's just like how some ppl don't like "chick flicks" because it's too much about feelings; some ppl require their readings to be devoted of feelings and only written in a cold hard way. so i think some of the more feminine parts of the book can go either way.

7
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 10, 2012
at 02:32 AM

I like that she seemed to write it while still riding that "middle finger moment" wave about what she had been previously been led to believe in her vegan life. I generally don't try to use anger as a motivator, but this book is so full of justifiable anger that it felt pretty good feeling her anger and my own about the same issues while reading the book.

I think anyone who has tried to push through on an animal-free diet even though they weren't thriving (not saying it can't be done, just saying I couldn't do it) and especially if they pushed it to the point of becoming ill will find the book cathartic. It is good therapy for when you have that "accepting your place in the food chain" moment, but still have guilt issues acting on it.

D8f58eba263277ec6119293137b85b02

(1061)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:32 AM

Yeah, that anger, so evident in the title alone (maybe not to us, but the harshest way to attack any belief is to call it a myth), is why I'm hesitant to suggest it to my vegetarian sister. I don't want to seem like I'm manically proselytizing and if she goes into it on the defense, I'm thinking she won't be able to open her mind to it enough.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 10, 2012
at 03:49 AM

I gave a copy of it to a mostly vegetarian family member for xmas, and she's still talking to me. I only thought to give it to her though because when I was reading it at a family gathering she seemed to enjoy flipping through it. Out of the blue might not be so good. Maybe baby steps starting with talking about rewilding efforts where large ruminant grazing has been able to reverse both desertification and melting of the permafrost in grazing experiments.

6
9dd4d453f7ebd7fd2a82814d08fc8f17

on February 10, 2012
at 01:38 AM

i have a copy and it's what started me on the journey to use nutrition to safe my own life (cheesy.... lol).

it's written extremely well with 3 different sections in the book - 1) the philosophy of eating and life itself, 2) realistic prediction of what really happens if the world ate grass/farm grown meat as a stable opposed to CAFO meat or the world on a veg diet, and 3) science.

i found the book very effective in dispelling all the lies about how the world could be fed with grains/veggies. it was very clear and simple in explaining the issues with how grains aren't meant for consumptions (not like how some ppl just focus on such complicated micro chemical stuff...).

on top of all that, she was a vegan for 20 odd yrs from teenage yrs and because of that she now still has spinal damage and many other physical issues. her writing shows her deep passion about her past.

it's a must read!

5
8dbe73235f73c615f20d3d0f34b4852a

(1365)

on February 10, 2012
at 05:00 AM

I think my biggest take-away was that you really can't remove humans from the natural cycle of life/predator/prey/food/death, and attempts to do so have consequences that aren't always so great. Also there are too many people on the planet.

3
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on February 10, 2012
at 02:16 AM

I have read it and enjoyed it, but it was so long ago that I can't really give you any specific thoughts about it. It's one on my list to read again, but I have to get through my stack of new books first.

2
D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on February 10, 2012
at 06:03 AM

I read it, enjoyed it, but had to process it through a filter to separate out the over-the-top aspects. It is one of the books that cemented my belief that there is something about eating paleo/primal that other ethical diet lifestyles were missing right in front of their eyes.

It helped remove all guilt I had for eating meat that I picked up from certain veg*an acquaintances of mine exuded towards folks not as hard core as they are.

Like "A at Grain Free Diet" I intend to read it again soon.

1
C00e493393828df34be65ddc25456c7c

(610)

on February 10, 2012
at 09:12 AM

Didnt Melissa at HuntGatherLove remove the book from her recommended books on her site. Can't remember the reason. Edit -here is a post about it: http://huntgatherlove.com/node/619

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 10, 2012
at 09:25 AM

I believe it mostly had to do with the threatening comments received by fans and enemies of the book alike. If anyone is in a position to critique the book, I believe it would be Melissa, but she took a whole lotta [email protected]!t from both sides for offering both her support and criticisms of the book.

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 10, 2012
at 11:13 PM

That link is actually her review of "Deep Green Resistance: Strategy to Save the Planet", by Lierre Keith, Derrick Jensen, and Aric McBay.

3786c1756c645498613573dfcfe2ff5f

on February 16, 2012
at 01:46 AM

Thank you for that link. I wondered if any of the major paleo bloggers had read it.

0
Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on February 10, 2012
at 11:10 PM

If you read the three-star reviews on it on Amazon, you will find many thoughtful, well-written, fairly balanced, intelligent critiques of it.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!