2

votes

cottage cheese and druglike effect

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 14, 2012 at 8:02 PM

i heard someone say on youtube that if you ate alot of cottage cheese, the casein in it wouldnt break down in your system as an normal protein would and it would affect your neurotransmitters in a way that a drug would. did anyone heard about this? whats your take on it?

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 03:40 PM

how does gluten affect the brain?!

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 12:51 PM

i hope this helps

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 12:50 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqK9RjfCFbM

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 12:50 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpgHdzYcI9A

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 12:49 PM

i dont know, mesomorphine is in a mothers breast milk also,..any dairy really. i like it so i eat it postWO, taking in consideration that dairy products can be very adictive

Ba99a15e6bf870b81286791617050593

(671)

on October 15, 2012
at 12:39 PM

So would we consider that good or bad?

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 12:13 PM

it has the same afect as a small dose of morphin,

Ba99a15e6bf870b81286791617050593

(671)

on October 15, 2012
at 11:49 AM

What exactly is the 'drug-like' effect? Seems like this could encompass a range of things good and bad. Do we need to make sure our children aren't housing tubs of cottage cheese each night?

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 14, 2012
at 08:41 PM

thank you for the link friend

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on October 14, 2012
at 08:16 PM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casomorphin

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

1
94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on October 29, 2012
at 01:43 PM

"Casomorphin are peptides, i.e., protein fragments, derived from the digestion of milk protein casein. The distinguishing characteristic of casomorphins is that they have an opioid effect." Gluten exorphins and gliadorphins are the opiod peptides in gluten that may hit your system if your digestion doesn't break them down properly.

These bits of info are the basis of the hypothesis that gluten-free casein-free diet can help some people with autism but there's no good scientific support for it. My son was just about to be evaluated for autism spectrum and/or ADHD when I got him tested for celiac. He has celiac disease as do I and his symptoms have improved on a glutenfree diet. Based only on our experience, I of course feel children should be checked out medically thoroughly before being labelled with a psychiatric diagnosis.

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 29, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Chocolate affects you "like a drug". Caffeine affects you "like a drug". I would look waaaaay further than someone mentioning something on youtube to hold that as absolute truth, just from an information perspective. Dairy is a very pleasurable food item, and if you can tolerate it and it doesn't stimulate binges- go for it. If you want to see if it makes a big difference, eliminate for 30 days and see how you feel when you reintroduce it.

0
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on October 15, 2012
at 07:17 AM

Yes, it's true. Some proteins break down into morphine-like metabolites if your digestion sucks or if you eat too much of X protein. Gluten is another such protein.

2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 15, 2012
at 03:40 PM

how does gluten affect the brain?!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!